Upholster a vintage cocktail chair
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18 students enrolled

Upholster a vintage cocktail chair

Upholstery skills
0.0 (0 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
18 students enrolled
Created by Stof en Steen
Last updated 5/2020
English
English [Auto]
Current price: $12.99 Original price: $49.99 Discount: 74% off
4 days left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
This course includes
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • DIY upholster a complete chair
  • Knowledge of materials
  • Use upholstery machines and tools
  • Make piping
Requirements
  • Some basic upholstery skills
Description

During this course I will learn you how to reupholster a vintage cocktail chair with a professional finish. If you have never reupholstered a chair before it is no problem as I get you through the whole process step by step. However if you want some basic skills first then it might be helpful for you to enroll my other course on udemy - Modern upholstery fundamentals.

During the video's I will take you through the following stages of how to's:

  • Remove the old fabric.

  • Create a seat with a mesh spring unit.

  • Apply crin and jute (filling).

  • Make a jute edge roll.

  • Sew a piping.

  • Attach the fabric.

See you in class.

Who this course is for:
  • Do it your selfers
  • Designers
  • Stylists
Course content
Expand all 21 lectures 01:08:35
+ The start removing the old covers
4 lectures 07:55

Before you start have a look at this video about safety. You will need some protection if you work with tools and old stuffing of chairs. So wear a dustmask, goggles, hearing protection.

Preview 00:23

I am showing you a few types of staple lifters and how they work. It's up to you what you prefer.

If you have never done an upholstery project before, you might just want to check my other course on udemy as well. It's all about the basic fundamentals of upholstery.

Preview 01:07

If you find there are a lot of upholstery tacks in you chair which need to be removed. This tool might be the one you want instead of a staplelifter

Preview 00:15

The first lecture is all about removing the old fabric and showing you what's inside this vintage chair.

Preview 06:10
+ The build up of the seat
4 lectures 19:31

Here is the list about the use of jute:

Hessian : is a sort which is made from jute and used for all sorts of upholstery jobs.

Tarpaulin : is a close woven heavy duty hessian. For over springs and webbing as it does not allow hair or fibre to leak through.

Linnen scrim:  It is finer but strong and easy to work with. It's used instead of jute.

Jute scrim : Has good straight threads to follow when cutting and sewing. For the top side of your upholstery pad

Building up the seat with jute
10:29

In this video I show you how to create your own edgeroll. They are also available already made for you.

Making an edgeroll
02:42
Attaching the edgeroll and the crin vegetal filling
05:37
Getting some material knowledge of types of stuffing
00:43
+ Building up the backrest
2 lectures 03:49
Prepairing the backrest for the stuffing
01:49

Instead of crin you can also use the cocosfibre filling which is a lot cheaper. For this backrest you will need approx. 2,5 kilos of stuffing.

Building up the backrest with Crin
02:00
+ The upholstery fabric and piping
3 lectures 07:51
How to make a slipstitch
04:42
Information about the upholstery fabric
01:56

If you are not using a leather piping but a faux leather, sometimes is better to cut it on the bias. It will run smoother at the corners.

Instead of the cotton cord, there are also platic ones in the market or even ready made for you. They come in all different sizes as well. Mine in the video is 6mm.

How to create and sew the piping
01:13
+ Attaching the upholstery fabric on the seat and backrest
4 lectures 17:10
Applying the fabric on the seat
06:02

Understandably not every one has a buttonmachine. There are handsets available in the DIY stores, but (at least mine) your hands will go hurting. You can also ask your local upholsterer to make them for you. There are also services available online.

Making the upholstered buttons
02:14
Applying the fabric on the innerback
05:00
Applying the fabric on the outerback
03:54