Teaching Grammar for Business Essays
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Teaching Grammar for Business Essays

Techniques and materials for English language teachers
5.0 (3 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
15 students enrolled
Created by Ken Paterson
Last updated 11/2019
English
English
Current price: $13.99 Original price: $19.99 Discount: 30% off
5 hours left at this price!
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This course includes
  • 3 hours on-demand video
  • 25 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • At the end of the course, you will be able to teach the 12 key grammatical features that students need to write high-quality business essays.
  • You will be able to design your own course in grammar for business essays, using the materials and advice provided.
  • You will be able to describe how the demands of business essay writing shape its grammar.
Requirements
  • You should be teaching or preparing to teach English to Business and/or Management students.
Description

It’s fairly easy these days to access the materials you need to teach students how to plan essays, write introductions or conclusions, develop paragraphs or make citations - but rather more difficult to find materials that focus specifically on the key grammar that your students require (often at a sentence level) for the three fundamental processes of academic business writing: being objective, building information, and connecting ideas. 

This course seeks to fill that gap. 

By the time you have finished, you will have the classroom techniques and all the materials you need to teach, within a business context, the most relevant aspects of these 12 features: cautious language, defining language, passives, impersonal subjects, noun phrases, relative clauses, verb clauses, linkers, conditionals, cause and effect, comparison and cohesion/signposting

After a brief introduction, describing the rationale for the course and how it works in detail, two or three of the 12 items above are covered in each of the next five sections of the course, under these headings:     

Being objective in a business essay: grammar for functions

Being objective in a business essay: key grammar items

Building information in a business essay

Connecting ideas in a business essay: key grammar items

Connecting ideas in a business essay: grammar for functions

Each of the main lectures acts like a suggested lesson plan. What I do is to take you through the stages of the lesson, giving you all the material that you need on the accompanying slides, or ‘pages’ as I call them, including examples, exercises with answers, lists of key language, and activities for your students. (With longer exercises and activities I show you the beginning, and you can download the rest in the ‘lesson planning resources’ at the end of each lecture.) There are also printable revision worksheets for your students at the end of each section.

So you don’t need to copy anything down as you watch, in fact, because all of the material you see on the ‘pages’ (as well as the endings to longer exercises and activities ) is available in the downloadable, adaptable ‘lesson planning resources’ for you to use in a way that suits your own physical or online classroom: copying key language onto a whiteboard, for example, or printing it off for your students, or displaying it by computer.   

As you progress through the course, you can use the knowledge you gain in three immediate ways:

1) check your own understanding of the grammar items by trying the student exercises that you see on the slides (or their longer versions in the resources) before you look at the answers;

2) when you've watched an individual lecture, use the resources to create a lesson plan that will work for your students;

3) try teaching some of the items to your students before you complete the course - the experience you gain may be helpful when you come to watch the next new lecture.

Please note:

1) this course focuses exclusively on students’ grammatical control, often at a sentence level. It doesn’t deal with study skills or essay development in general.

2) All of the material is set within a modern business context, covering areas such as human resources, marketing and finance.

Who this course is for:
  • This course is for teachers of English as a Foreign or Second Language who want to teach their students the key grammar required for business essays.
Course content
Expand all 27 lectures 02:54:35
+ Introduction
2 lectures 13:08

The three demands on a student writing a business essay, and how these demands have shaped the contents and structure of the course.

Preview 05:40

How each section is organised, the typical format of the main lectures, and how to use the course materials to create lesson plans for your classroom.

Preview 07:28
+ Being objective in a business essay: grammar for functions
4 lectures 21:40

An overview of the section contents: how to teach the grammar that students need to be 'cautious' in their business writing, and to make definitions.

Introduction
04:26

A definition of 'hedging', and how to teach verbs like 'tend', 'appear', and 'may', and phrases like 'it is estimated that'.

Preview 05:14

How to teach adverbs like 'arguably', 'normally' and 'typically', phrases like 'it is unlikely that', and expressions like 'as a rule'.

Cautious language: using adverbs, adjectives and expressions
04:32

How to teach different ways of making definitions in business essays, using 'category nouns' such as 'tool' or 'mechanism', relative clauses, and phrases like 'by which' and 'for' + the -ing form of the verb.

Defining language
07:28
+ Being objective in a business essay: key grammar items
4 lectures 25:04

An overview of the section contents: how to teach simple and complex forms of the passive for business writing, and the impersonal subjects 'it' and 'there'.

Introduction
04:54

How to teach the concept and form of the passive, and the use of multiple passives in a short business text.

Passives: main function
07:37

How to teach passives with modal verbs, and passives in a key group of verbs with prepositions (e.g. 'be based on' and 'be associated with'.)

Passives: more complex forms
04:28

How to teach the use of 'it' and 'there' to introduce information in business writing (e.g. 'It is essential to ...', 'There are three main reasons why ...').

Impersonal subjects: 'it' and 'there'
08:05
+ Building information in a business essay: key grammar items
7 lectures 52:10

An overview of the section contents: how to teach noun phrases, relative clauses and verb clauses.

Introduction
04:23

How to teach nouns in pairs, e.g. 'business analysts', 'research findings'.

Noun phrases: noun + noun
09:02

How to teach compound adjectives in phrases such as 'urgently-required banking reforms', and prepositional phrases, e.g. 'the need for change'.

Preview 06:45

How to teach the difference between the two types of relative clause; when to use commas; and when to use 'that' or omit the relative pronoun.

Relative clauses: defining and non-defining
09:35

How to teach the use of 'whose', a preposition + 'whom/which' (or 'where/when/why' instead), and how to reduce relative clauses.

Relative clauses: 'whose', 'in which' etc. and reduced clauses
07:14

How to explain the four types of verb clause, and how to explore the difference between 'that' and 'wh-' clauses (clauses starting with 'what/when/where' etc.).

Verb clauses: 'that' and 'wh-' clauses
07:29

How to help students to build information in business writing by 'adding' one verb to another, using the infinitive or the -ing form.

Verb clauses: infinitive and '-ing' clauses
07:42
+ Connecting ideas in a business essay: key grammar items
4 lectures 28:36

An overview of the section contents: how to help students to connect ideas in their business writing through cohesion, linkers and conditional structures.

Introduction
02:25

How to teach words like 'this/these' (sometimes with summarising nouns: 'this method' etc.), and how to help students with ellipsis (leaving words out) and synonyms.

Cohesion
08:50

How to teach linking words and phrases that add to ideas (e.g. 'not only ... but also'), make concessions (e.g. 'although'), exemplify (e.g. 'for instance') or restate (e.g. 'that is to say').

Linkers
09:37

How to teach first, second and third conditional structures for business essays; variations on the structures; 'unless', 'as long as', 'provided that'.

Conditionals
07:44
+ Connecting ideas in a business essay: grammar for functions
6 lectures 33:57

An overview of the section contents: how to help students to link cause and effect, to make comparisons, and to use 'signposting' in their business essays.

Introduction
03:01

How to teach the concept of cause and effect, and to help students use linking words and phrases such as 'consequently', 'so ... that', 'which means that', 'on account of' etc.

Cause and effect: linkers
06:17

How to teach the verbs and nouns commonly used to express cause and effect, including 'cause', 'result in', 'stem from' and 'source', 'outcome', 'effect'.

Cause and effect: verbs and nouns
06:31

How to teach comparison structures using 'more ... than' and 'as ... as' with modifiers such as 'considerably', 'marginally' and 'almost'.

Comparison: two main structures
06:09

How to check students' knowledge of superlatives in a business context (including ways to hedge them), and how to teach key words and phrases for expressing similarities and differences.

Comparison: superlative, and key words and phrases
06:38

How to teach 'signposting' within a piece of business writing, including 'stating the scope', making a thesis statement, and referring to previous and forthcoming parts of the essay.

Signposting
05:21