QC151 Quantum Physics for Quantum Computing
4.5 (92 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
643 students enrolled

QC151 Quantum Physics for Quantum Computing

Non-mathematical coverage of Superposition and Entanglement. Intuitive & qualitative preparation for advanced topics
Bestseller
4.5 (92 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
643 students enrolled
Last updated 5/2019
English
English
Current price: $20.99 Original price: $29.99 Discount: 30% off
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This course includes
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 1 article
  • 1 downloadable resource
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • Build a strong foundation in Quantum Physics to help you learn advanced topics in Quantum Computing
  • Develop an intuitive understanding of Superposition and Entanglement using Simulators
Course content
Expand all 37 lectures 01:35:32
+ Single Particle Systems - Superposition & Measurement
12 lectures 22:39
Download Simulator Code
00:16
Running Simulations
01:36
Simulating Limitations of Measurements
01:39
More on Limitations of Measurements
02:17
Simulation of No-Cloning
02:22
More on the No-Cloning Theorem
01:56
Measurement is Irreversible
00:37
Deterministic vs Probabilistic
00:48
Simulation of Deterministic Behavior
04:06
Simulating Superposition
03:34
Collapse of Superposition
02:18
Measurement & Superposition
01:10
+ Two Particle Systems - Entanglement & Bell States
8 lectures 26:04
Two Photon Systems
01:59
Dependent Behavior
02:04
Simulating Entanglement
05:59
Systems Without Preferred Direction - The Bell State
03:41
Changing Angles of Measurement
03:27
More on Bell States
03:22
Independent Photons
02:03
Recap
03:29
Requirements
  • All the Math covered in QC051 Math Foundation for Quantum Computing
  • 12th grade level high school Math and Physics
  • Fundamentals of Quantum Computing as covered in QC101
  • You must know how to compile and run simple Java programs. Elementary knowledge of Java is enough.
Description

This is a follow-on course to QC101. It helps you gain an intuitive and qualitative understanding of basic quantum physics to help you understand more advanced quantum computing courses.

Unlike the earlier QC101 course, this course has very little Math. The aim is to help you understand qualitatively how the physics of quantum mechanics works.


Why do you need a Qualitative Understanding of Quantum Physics?

The Math of quantum physics is different, but it is not complicated. In many ways it is simpler than the engineering calculus that many of you studied in college. Although quantum math is simple, its mathematical simplicity hides many strange, yet important behaviors.

For instance, the mathematical representation of a Bell State is very simple. But the physical implications of a Bell State are weird. A photon has an angle of polarization, a property that is like a direction. But strangely, photons that are entangled in the Bell State behave as though they have no preferred angle or direction.

An intuitive appreciation of such weird behavior will be useful when I present more advanced topics on quantum algorithms in later courses.

To help you understand quantum physics qualitatively, I have provided simulators written in Java. Running the simulators and studying the Java source-code will help you gain a qualitative understanding that goes beyond merely knowing how to do the Math.


How can you get the most from this course?

Unlike the earlier QC101, this course is light on Math. The primary aim of this course is to ensure that you are completely comfortable with the implications of superposition and entanglement. I spend a lot of time reinforcing basic concepts that were already introduced in QC101. Later in the course, I highlight some weird implications of entanglement.

The content is not challenging. But don't stop with viewing the videos. To get the most from this course, I encourage you to run my simulators with your own virtual experiments.


The first 16 lessons can be previewed for free. Watch the free preview lessons and enroll today.

Who this course is for:
  • Students who want to learn advanced quantum computing concepts