PMI-ACP Exam Prep for PMBOK 6
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PMI-ACP Exam Prep for PMBOK 6

Pass the PMI-ACP Exam based on PMBOK Guide 6: Everything You Need to Pass the PMI-ACP
Bestseller
4.6 (6,903 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
24,158 students enrolled
Created by Joseph Phillips
Last updated 11/2019
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This course includes
  • 13 hours on-demand video
  • 10 articles
  • 2 downloadable resources
  • 1 Practice Test
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Assignments
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • Qualify for the PMI-ACP Certification Exam
  • Build an Agile Mindset
  • Identify characteristics of value-driven projects
  • Claim 21 Professional Development Units (PDUs)
  • Identify the characteristics of a successful agile project
  • Discuss agile project management in depth
  • Pass the PMI-ACP examination
Requirements
  • Understanding of PMI-ACP certification
  • What agile project management is and is not
  • Qualifications for the PMI-ACP examination
Description

Looking for a PMI-ACP exam prep course with 21 PDUs? This is it!

We have passed a quality audit, a business review, and we completely abide by the PMI REP program.

You want to earn the PMI-ACP certification and you need quality training without all the nonsense and fluff so many courses offer. You do want to learn from an authority in project management that’s also certified as a PMI-ACP.

This is the course you want. This course provides 21 hours of Agile project management education and is taught by project management author and expert Joseph Phillips. You can claim these 21 hours as 21 PDUs for your continuing PMI education.

Our PMI-ACP® Exam Prep course provides complete coverage of the PMI-ACP® exam objectives for the PMBOK Guide, Sixth Edition and the library of Agile resources PMI recommends. Start today, invest in your career, and begin working to clear your PMI-ACP® exam. Here's what's included in our PMI-ACP® Exam Prep Online Seminar:

►21 Professional Development Units (PDUs)

►PMI CCRS Activity ID: PMIACP318

►Includes PMI updates from PMBOK Guide, sixth edition

►Complete coverage of the entire PMI-ACP® exam objectives

►21 contact hours of project management education

►Practice exam questions and answers on all exam objectives

►Module exams covering every PMI-ACP exam objective

►PDF course workbook; entire course for note-taking and following along

►Videos of all concepts, formulas, theories, and agile project management practices

►Lectures on the entire PMI-Agile® exam objectives

►24 x 7 Web and mobile access

►All terms for the PMI-ACP terms you must know for exam success

►Course discussions with the Instructor and peers

►30-day satisfaction guaranteed

Who this course is for:
  • Project managers who qualify for the PMI-ACP examination
  • Project managers seeking more information about agile project manager
Course content
Expand all 222 lectures 13:11:59
+ Preparing to Pass the PMI-ACP Exam
15 lectures 01:27:47

This lecture is an overview of the entire course and what you can expect as you work through the material. In this lecture I'll discuss the lectures, resources, quizzes, games, and certificate of completion. 

In this course we'll cover all the PMI-ACP exam domains:

  • Agile principles and mindset
  • Value-driven delivery
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Team performance
  • Adaptive planning
  • Problems, issues, detection and resolution Continuous improvement
Preview 05:26

In this lecture I’ll discuss what it takes to be a PMI-ACP. Specifically, I’ll cover:

  • 2,000 hours of general project experience working on teams. A current PMP® or PgMP® will satisfy this requirement but is not required to apply for the PMI-ACP.
  • 1,500 hours working on agile project teams or with agile methodologies. This requirement is in addition to the 2,000 hours of general project experience.
  • 21 contact hours of training in agile practices.


    Qualifications for the PMI-ACP Exam
    03:15

    Agile is a topic of growing importance in project management. The marketplace reflects this importance, as project management practitioners increasingly embrace agile as a technique for managing successful projects. The PMI-ACP certification recognizes an individual’s expertise in using agile practices in their projects, while demonstrating their increased professional versatility through agile tools and techniques.

    Applying for the PMI-ACP Exam
    07:21

    Have you taken a PMI exam before, such as the CAPM or the PMP? The PMI-ACP exam is very similar in its format and structure. Of course the content is different, but the mechanics of the test is similar.

    In this lecture we’ll discuss all the basic questions about the exam and the testing center. We’ll cover the cost of taking the PMI-ACP exam.

    Preview 05:08

    PMI membership is separate from PMI certifications. However, as a PMI member, you will have access to many benefits including discounts on your certification exam fee as well as discounts on professional development opportunities to help with maintenance of your certification(s).

    Join PMI
    03:08

    This lecture details the contents and mechanics of the PMI-ACP exam. In this lecture I'll discuss:

    PMI-ACP exam scoring

    PMI-ACP exam blueprint

    Testing center details

    Scheduling and rescheduling the test

    And everything else you must know before applying and scheduling to pass the PMI-ACP examination.

    Passing the PMI-ACP Exam
    03:55

    Your goal and my goal is the same thing: you passing the PMI-ACP exam on your first attempt. Your study efforts, like a project, require planning and execution. In this lecture we’ll review a good study strategy to prepare to pass, not just take the PMI-ACP exam.

    Preparing a Study Strategy - to Pass!
    04:13
    You need a good study strategy to pass the PMI-ACP exam. This isn’t an exam, so you’ll want to be well-prepared to pass the PMI-ACP on your first attempt. This assignment will help you plan out your study strategy so you can prepare to pass the exam.
    Assignment: Creating a Study Strategy
    5 questions

    Prometric has some specific rules when it comes to taking your PMI-ACP exam:

    You will be required to remove your eyeglasses for close visual inspection. These inspections will take a few seconds and will be done at check-in and again upon return from breaks before you enter the testing room to ensure you do not violate any security protocol.

    Jewelry outside of wedding and engagement rings is prohibited. Please do not wear other jewelry to the test center. Hair accessories and ties are subject to inspection. Please refrain from using ornate clips, combs, barrettes, headbands, tie clips, cuff links and other hair accessories as you may be prohibited from wearing them in to the testing room and asked to store them in your locker. Violation of security protocol may result in the confiscation of prohibited devices and termination of your exam.

    What to Expect on Testing Day
    06:52

    In this lecture I'll walk you through all of the PMI references and resources to help you prepare to pass the PMI-ACP examination. In this lecture we'll look at:

    • Official PMI-ACP exam objectives
    • PMI-ACP Handbook
    • PMI exam guidance
    • PMI-ACP reference list

    These resources are useful to understand exactly what PMI will test you. You'll want to read and refer to these resources often as you prepare to pass the PMI-ACP exam.

    What Your Exam is Based Upon
    02:25

    Now we’re moving a little deeper into the examination details. In this lecture I’ll walk you through all of the exam domains and tasks that you’ll be tested on. This lecture is the key to the entire course – as it covers exactly what you’ll be tested on, so pay close attention to this lecture.

    In this lecture we’re going to talk about the exam blueprint and what you must know. You can also use this blueprint to plan your study strategy accordingly. In this lecture we’ll cover these topics for your PMI-ACP exam:

    • Domain I. Agile Principles and Mindset   16%
    • Domain II. Value-driven Delivery 20%
    • Domain III. Stakeholder Engagement      17%
    • Domain IV. Team Performance  16%
    • Domain V. Adaptive Planning     12%
    • Domain VI. Problem Detection and Resolution    10%
    • Domain VII. Continuous Improvement     9%


      PMI-ACP Exam Domains
      21:52

      According to PMI, the PMI-ACP® is their fastest growing certification, and it’s no wonder. Organizations that are highly agile and responsive to market dynamics complete more of their projects successfully than their slower-moving counterparts — 75 percent versus 56 percent — as shown in our 2015 Pulse of the Profession® report.

      The PMI-ACP spans many approaches to agile such as Scrum, Kanban, Lean, extreme programming (XP) and test-driven development (TDD.) So it will increase your versatility, wherever your projects may take you.

      In this lecture you’ll access and download the PMI-ACP Exam Handbook.

      PMI-ACP Exam Handbook
      02:43

      Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

      PMI-ACP Coach
      02:20
      PMI-ACP Exam Details Learning Game
      00:04

      Great job finishing this first section of the PMI-ACP Exam Prep course. You’ve done something already that many people only talk about: actually investing some time and effort into earning a PMI certification. Yes, this is only the first section, but it’s a start and that’s more than most people even attempt.

      But you’re not done yet! You need to keep going, build momentum and complete this course.

      In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what we discussed in this course. This is a new recap of what’s been covered and the most important topics from this first section.

      Section Summary
      02:37

      Understanding the key terms are an important factor for passing the PMI-ACP exam. There are lots of key terms throughout this course – and it’s up to you to create and review your flashcards daily. Don’t skip understanding all the terms. If you can understand the terms, you’re more likely to understand exam questions. The terms are also included as a downloadable resource in this lecture.

      PMI-ACP Exam Prep: Glossary of Agile Terms


      ACP

      Agile Certified Practitioner

        

      Acceptance Test Driven Development

      A method used to communicate with business customers, developers, and testers before coding begins.

       

      Active Listening

      To focus on what is said and provide feedback to communicate understanding

       

      Adaptive Leadership

      A leadership style that helps teams to thrive and overcome challenges throughout a project.

       

      Affinity Estimation

      A method used to quickly place user stories into a comparable-sized group.

       

      Agile

      To develop a goal through periodic experimentation in order to fulfill the need of a complex decision.

       

      Agile Adaption

      To adapt the project plan continuously through retrospectives in order to maximize value creation during the planning process.

       

      Agile Coaching

      To help achieve goals that is either personal or organizational.

       

      Agile Experimentation

      To use the empirical process, observation, and spike introduction while executing a project to influence planning.

       

      Agile Manifesto

      A statement that reflects Agile Philosophy that includes: individuals and interactions over processes and tools, working software over comprehensive documentation, customer collaboration over contract negotiation, and responding to changes over following a plan.

       

      Agile Manifesto Principles

      A document that describes the twelve principles of the Agile Manifesto.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Customer Satisfaction

      To satisfy customers through early and continuous delivery of products, to test and receive feedback, to inform customers on progress, and to fulfill the customer’s value by completing priority requirements.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Welcome Changes

      To allow quick responses to changes in the external environment, and late in development to maximize the customer’s competitive advantage.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Frequent Delivery

      To deliver software frequently to the customer, allowing for a quicker product release, faster provision of value to the customer and shorter delivery timeframe.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Collocated Team

      To have individuals work together daily on a project to implement osmotic communication, focus, and receive instant feedback to achieve a common goal.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Motivated Individuals

      To give individuals the empowerment, environment, support, and trust needed to complete a task successfully.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Face-to-Face Conversation

      The most efficient and effective way to communicate in order to receive direct feedback and influence osmotic communication.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Working Software

      Working software enables the measurement of progress, enhance customer satisfaction, and maintain and improve the quality of the software to help support project goals.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Constant Pace

      To help team members establish a healthy work-life balance, remain productive, and respond to changes swiftly for progress during a project.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Continuous Attention

      To enhance agility and time spent on work requirements in order to retain a well-balanced work environment.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Simplicity

      Allows team members to focus on what is necessary to achieve the requirements needed to create and deliver value to the project and customer.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Self-Organization

      A team that knows how to complete tasks effectively, has dedication to the project, and is expert on the process and project.

       

      Agile Manifesto: Regular Reflection

      This allows a team to learn how to become more effective, what changes need immediate implementation, and behavior that needs adjustment.

       

      Agile Mentoring

      To pass on and teach based on experience, knowledge, and skills to other individuals in the team or that work for the organization.

       

      Agile Methodologies

      A way to complete a goal effectively and efficiently. Examples of Agile Methodologies include XP, Scrum, and Lean.

       

      Agile Modeling

      A workflow depiction of a process or system a team can review before it is turned into code. Stakeholders should understand the model.

       

      Agile Planning

      The most important aspect of the Agile project. Planning happens at multiple levels such as strategic, release, iteration, and daily. Planning must happen up-front and can change throughout the project.

       

      Agile Practices

      To make use of the Agile principles through activities.

       

      Agile Projects

      A project that occurs based on the Agile Manifesto and Agile Principles.

       

      Agile Smells

      Symptoms of problems that affect Agile teams and projects.

       

      Agile Space

      A space that allows team members to establish collaboration, communication, transparency, and visibility.

       

      Agile Themes

      Themes used to help the team focus on the functions of iteration.

       

      Agile Tooling

      To increase team morale with software or artifacts.

       

      Analysis

      To develop possible solutions by studying the problem and its underlying need and to understand the information provided.

       

      Approved Iterations

      After the deadline of iteration is reached, the team and stakeholders conduct a meeting for approval. Stakeholders approve the iteration if the backlog used supports the product increment.

       

      Architectural Spikes

      Spikes that relate to any area of a system, technology, or application domain that is unknown.

       

      Artifact

      A process or work output Ex. Document, Code

       

      ASD

      Exhibits continuous adaptation to the project and its processes with characteristics that include: mission focused, feature based, iterative, time-boxed, risk driven, and change tolerant.

       

      Automated Testing Tools

      These tools allow for efficient and strong testing. Examples: Peer Reviews, Periodical Code-Reviews, Refactoring, Unit Tests, Automatic and Manual Testing.

       

      Being Agile

      To work in a responsive way to deliver the products or services a customer needs and when they want the products or services.

       

      Brainstorming

      An effective and efficient way of gathering ideas within a short period of time from a group.

       

      Burn-Down Chart

      A chart used to display progress during and at the end of iteration. “Burning down” means the backlog will lessen throughout the iteration.

       

      Burn Rate

      The rate of resources consumed by the team; also cost per iteration.

       

      Burn-Up Chart

      A chart that displays completed functionality. Progress will trend upwards, as stories are completed. Only shows complete functions, it is not accurate at predicting or showing work-in-progress.

       

      CARVER

      An acronym to measure the goals and mission of the project with each letter meaning: Criticality, Accessibility, Return, Vulnerability, Effect, and Recognizeability.

       

      Ceremony

      A meeting conducted during an Agile project that consists of daily stand-up, iteration planning, iteration review, and iteration retrospective.

       

      Change

      To change requirements that increase value to the customer.

       

      Charter

      A document created during initiation that formally begins the project. The document includes the project’s justification, a summary level budget, major milestones, critical success factors, constraints, assumptions, and authorization to do it.

       

      Chicken

      An individual involved but not committed to an Agile project.

       

      Coach

      A team role that keeps the team focused on learning and the process.

       

      Collaboration

      A method of cooperation among individuals to achieve a common goal.

       

      Collective Code Ownership

      The entire team together is responsible for 100% of the code.

       

      Collocation

      The entire team is physically present, working in one room.

       

      Common Cause

      An issue solved through trend analysis because the issue is systematic.

       

      Communication

      To share smooth and transparent information of needs.

       

      Command & Control

      Decisions created by higher up individuals in the organization and handed over to the team.

       

      Compliance

      To meet regulations, rules, and standards.

       

      Cone of Silence

      An environment for the team that is free of distractions and interruptions.

       

      Conflict

      Disagreements in certain areas between individuals.

       

      Conflict Resolution

      An agreement made after a conflict.

       

      Continuous Improvement

      To ensure that self-assessment and process improvement occurs frequently to improve the product.

       

      Continuous Integration

      To consistently examine a team member’s work. To build, and test the entire system.

       

      Coordination

      To organize work with the goal of higher productivity and teamwork.

       

      Cost Performance Index (CPI)

      To measure the cost spent on a project and its efficiency. Earned Value / Actual Cost = CPI

       

      Cross-Functional Team

      Teams that consist of members who can multi-task well and complete various functions to achieve a common goal.

       

      Crystal Family

      An adaptable approach that focuses on interaction between people and processes that consists of families that vary based on team size, system criticality, and project priorities.

       

      Cumulative Flow Diagram

      A chart that displays feature backlog, work-in-progress, and completed features.

       

      Customer

      The end-user who determines and emphasizes business values.

       

      Customer-Valued Prioritization

      To deliver the maximum customer value early in order to win customer loyalty and support.

       

      Cycle Time

      The time needed to complete a feature (user story).

       

      Daily Stand Up

      A brief meeting where the team shares the previous day’s achievements, plans to make achievements, obstacles, and how to overcome the obstacles.

       

      Decide As Late As Possible

      To postpone decisions to determine possibilities and make the decision when the most amount of knowledge is available.

       

      DEEP

      The qualities of a product backlog which include: detailed, estimate-able, emergent, and prioritized.

       

      Deliverables

      A tangible or intangible object delivered to the customer. Ex. Document, Pamphlet, Report

       

      Disaggregation

      To separate epics or large stories into smaller stories.

       

      Dissatisfaction

      The lack of satisfaction among workers such as, work conditions, salary, and management-employee relationships. Factors known as demotivators.

       

      Distributive Negotiation

      To reach a deal through tactics so both parties receive the highest amount of value possible.

       

      Done

      When work is complete, and meets the following criteria: complies, runs without errors, and passes predefined acceptance and regression tests.

       

      Dot Voting

      A system of voting where people receive a certain number of dots to vote on the options provided.

       

      Dynamic Systems Development Model (DSDM)

      A model that provides a comprehensive foundation for planning, managing, executing, and scaling agile and iterative software development projects based on nine principles that involve business needs/value, active user involvement, empowered teams, frequent delivery, integrated testing, and stakeholder collaboration.

       

      Earned Value Management (EVM)

      Earned Value Management, works well at iteration. It is a method to measure and communicate progress and trends at the current stage of the project.

       

      Emergent

      Stories that grow and change overtime as other stories reach completion in the backlog.

       

      Emotional Intelligence

      An individual’s skill to lead and relate to other team members.

       

      Epic Story

      A large story that spans iterations, then disaggregated into smaller stories.

       

      Escaped Defects

      Defects reported after the delivery by the customer.

       

      Expectancy Theory

      An individual chooses to behave in a particular way over other behaviors because of the expected results of the chosen behavior.

       

      Exploratory Testing

      To inquire how software works with the use of test subjects using the software and asking questions about the software.

       

      Extreme Persona

      A team-manufactured persona that exaggerates to induce requirements a standard persona may miss.

       

      eXtreme Programming (XP)

      A methodology in Agile with one-week iterations and paired development.

       

      Feature-Driven Development (FDD)

      A comprehensive model and list of features included in the system before the design work begins.

       

      Feature

      A group of stories that deliver value to the customers.

       

      Feedback

      Information or responses towards a product or project used to make improvements.

       

      Fibonacci Sequence

      A sequence of numbers used in Agile estimating, 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 20, 40, 100.

       

      Finish Tasks One by One

      Tasks must be finished in all iterations to meet the “Definition of Done” requirements as a way to track progress and allow frequent delivery.

       

      Fishbone Diagram

      A root cause diagram.

       

      Five Whys

      The root causes analysis technique that asks WHY five times. The problem is looked into deeper each time WHY is asked. Toyota developed this technique.

       

      Fixed Time Box

      Assigned tasks prioritized for completion based on an estimated number of days. Top priorities are usually completed first.

       

      Focus

      To stay on task, and is facilitated by the scrum master or coach.

       

      Force Field Analysis

      To analyze forces that encourages or resists change.

       

      Functionality

      An action the customer must see and experience from a system, which will add value to the customer.

       

      Grooming

      To clean up the product backlog by removal of items, disaggregation of items, or estimation of items.

       

      Ground Rules

      Unwritten rules decided and followed by team members.

       

      Herzberg’s Hygiene Theory

      A theory that states factors in the workplace create satisfaction and dissatisfaction in relation to the job.

       

      High-Bandwidth Communication

      Face-to-face communication that also includes non-verbal communication.

       

      High Performing Team

      This team reaches maximum performance by creation of clear, detailed goals, open communication, accountability, empowerment, use of the participatory decision model, and the team consists of twelve dedicated members or less.

       

      Ideal Time

      The amount of time needed to complete an assignment without distractions or interruptions.

       

      Incremental Delivery

      Functionality conveyed in small phases.

       

      Incremental Project Releases

      To build upon the prior release of a goal, outcome, or product, not all requirements are met, but after all releases, the requirements will be met.

       

      Information Radiator

      Artifacts used to help maintain transparency of a project status to team members and stakeholders.

       

      Information Refrigerator

      Information that is not transparent or useful to the team and stakeholders.

       

      Innovation Games

      Practice used to induce requirements from product, owners, users, and stakeholders.

       

      Integrative Negotiation

      To reach an agreement collaboratively that creates more value for both parties by a win-win solution.

       

      Interaction

      Face-to-Face communication

       

      IRR

      Internal Rate of Return- a discount rate that makes the net present value of all cash flows from a project equal to zero. Used to determine potential profitability of project or investment.

       

      Intraspectives

      To inspect within, during a meeting with the Agile team to review practices, usually when a problem or issue occurs.

       

      Intrinsic Schedule Flaw

      Poor estimation that occurs at the beginning of iteration.

       

      INVEST

      The benefits of good user stories, which include: Independent, Negotiable, Valuable, Estimate-able, Small, and Testable.

       

      Iteration

      Work cycle, Scrum uses 2-4 weeks, XP uses 1 week.

       

      Iteration Backlog

      Work to complete in a particular iteration.

       

      Iteration H

      Iteration used to prepare the launch of software, and to test software.

       

      Iteration 0

      Iteration to complete tasks before the development work occurs, for technical and architectural spikes and to gather requirements into the backlog.

       

      Iteration Retrospective

      A meeting used in Scrum, the team discusses ways to improve after work is completed.

       

      Just-In-Time

      Used to minimize inventory cost by materials delivered before they are required.

       

      Kaizen

      Based on Japanese management philosophy, to continue improvement through small releases.

       

      Kanban

      A signal used to advance transparency of work-in-progress, a new task can begin once a previous one is complete.

       

      Kanban Board

      A chart that shows workflow stages to locate work-in-progress.

       

      Kano Analysis

      An analysis of product development and customer satisfaction based on needs fulfilled/not fulfilled vs. satisfaction/dissatisfaction.

       

      Last Responsible Moment

      To make decisions as late as possible in order to preserve all possible options.

       

      Lean Methodology

      To eliminate waste, an Agile method derived from manufacturing.

       

      Little’s Law

      The law that limits work-in-progress efficiently with development of an appropriate cycle time.

       

      Low Performing Team

      This team has a lack of trust, no accountability, fear of conflict, less commitment, and less attention to details and results.

       

      Lean Software Development (LSD)

      This methodology focuses on the “Value Stream” to deliver value to customers. The goal is to eliminate waste by focusing on valuable features of a system and to deliver the value in small batches. Principles of Lean include: elimination of waste, amplify learning, to decide late as possible, deliver as fast as possible, empowerment of the team, to build in integrity, and to see the whole.

       

      Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

      This theory suggests the interdependent needs (motivators) of people based on five levels in this order: Physiological, Safety & Security, Social, Esteem, and Self-Actualization.

       

      Metaphor

      To explain how a project will be completed successfully to stakeholders by use of real-world examples of systems and components.

       

      Minimal Viable Product (MVP)

      A product with only the essential features delivered to early adopters to receive feedback.

       

      Minimal Marketing Feature (MMF)

      The smallest feature of a product that provides value to the end-user.

       

      Monopoly Money

      To give fake money to business features in order to compare the relative priority of those features.

       

      MoSCoW Analysis

      An analysis used to help stakeholders understand the importance of each requirement delivered. MoSCoW is the acronym for Must have, Should have, Could have, and Would like to have.

       

      Negotiation

      To reach an agreement between two or more parties to resolve a conflict.

       

      Negotiable

      Anything opened to discussion.

       

      NPV

      Net Present Value- A value that compares the amount invested today to the present value of future cash receipts from the investment.

       

      Osmotic Communication

      To communicate by sharing an environment.

       

      Pair Programming

      When developers work together in XP Practice

       

      Pareto Principle

      Known as the 80/20 rule. For Agile projects, it means that 80% of all development should be spent on the top 20% of the features the customers need.

       

      Parking Lot

      A storage place for ideas that distract from the main goal during a meeting.

       

      Participatory Decision Models

      To have stakeholder’s involvement in decision making with techniques such as a simple vote.

       

      Persona

      A depiction of the customer of system with applicable details about usage.

       

      Personnel Loss

      When an employer faces the loss of a human resource through death, injury, or disability of an employee.

       

      Pig

      A committed individual impacted by the outcome.

       

      Plan-Do-Check-Act

      Work cycle in smaller, quick iterations than traditional.

       

      Planning Game

      To prioritize work and estimate effort required by creation of a release plan in XP.

       

      Planning Poker

      A tool used to estimate team effort on user stories.

       

      PMBOK Guide

      A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge

       

      PMI

      Project Management Institute

       

      Positive Value

      To maximize value through incremental work in order to gain competitive advantage.

       

      Pre-Mortem

      Team members asked to define reasons of a project’s failure and to identify causes of failure missed in previous analyses.

       

      Present Value

      A way to calculate the time value of money.

       

      Process Tailoring

      To perfect agile processes for a particular project and environment.

       

      Productivity

      The effectiveness of production, usually measured with output per unit of input.

       

      Productivity Variation

      The difference between the planned and actual performance.

       

      Product Backlog

      The known features for a project.

       

      Product Road Map

      An artifact that displays planned project functionality.

       

      Product Vision

      A document that describes what the product is, who will use the product, why the product will be used, and how the product supports the strategy of a company.

       

      Product Vision Statement

      A statement that defines the purpose and value of the product.

       

      Programmer

      The role of a team member that writes the code, a role used in XP.

       

      Progressive Elaboration

      An approach for planning that occurs in cycles instead of upfront, which happens frequently.

       

      Project

      An enterprise planned and designed to create a product, service, or result.

       

      PMP

      Project Management Professional credential.

       

      Prototyping

      A model used to perfect requirements.

       

      Qualitative

      Descriptive data used for analysis.

       

      Quality

      The specifications and requirements of product or service measured against the standard product or service in the industry.

       

      Quantitative

      Numerical data used for analysis.

       

      Refactoring

      To adjust working code to improve functionality and conservation.

       

      Relative Prioritization

      A list of all user stories and features ordered by highest priority to the lowest priority.

       

      Relative Sizing

      To estimate the size of a story in comparison with another story.

       

      Release

      Iteration outcomes delivered to customers (end-users).

       

      Release Plan

      A document that describes the timeline of a product release.

       

      Requirements at a High Level

      Requirements are in the form of user stories, and collected at a high level to estimate a budget.

       

      Requirements Prioritization Model

      A model to rate each feature with the calculation of weighted formula defined by the team.

       

      Requirements Review

      To review the requirements so they fulfill the needs and priorities of stakeholders.

       

      ROI

      Return on Investment- The return an organization makes on an investment expressed by a percentage.

       

      Risk

      The uncertainty of an unwanted outcome related to the project.

       

      Risk-Adjusted Backlog

      A product backlog adjusted to help balance the risk and value factors of product.

       

      Risk-Based Spike

      This spike helps the team remove major risks, and if the spike fails every approach possible, the project is defined as “fast failure”.

       

      Risk Burn Down

      A chart that displays risk and success with feature vs. time.

       

      Risk Impact

      To analyze the consequences of the risk if they occur based on their probability.

       

      Risk Probability

      The likelihood that the risk will occur.

       

      Risk Severity

      How much the risk’s consequences will influence the success or failure of a project. Risk Probability (%) x Risk Impact ($) = Risk Severity

       

      Role

      A person’s description that includes their function in an Agile project.

       

      Rolling Wave Planning

      To divide the planning phase into stages.

       

      Root Cause Analysis

      To investigate beyond the symptoms of the problem and to understand the root cause of the problem.

       

      Root Cause Diagram

      A diagram that correlates different factors and the symptom.

       

      Satisfaction

      The feeling of workers when their needs are fulfilled. Known as motivators.

       

      Schedule Performance Index

      The ratio of earned value to planned value. EV/PV=SPI.

       

      Scope Creep

      The uncontrolled changes or growth in a project’s scope which goes beyond the initial agreement.

       

      Scrum

      A popular Agile methodology.

       

      Scrum of Scrums

      Meetings used to organize large projects with scrum masters from different teams.

       

      Scum Master

      The leader that helps the team to follow Scrum methodology.

       

      Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC)

      This cycle tends to be long and requires a lot of advanced planning.

       

      Self-Directing Team

      This team has the capability to make their own decisions, empowerment, mutual accountability, and collective ownership of a project, which leads them to be more productive and efficient.

       

      Self-Organizing Team

      Naturally formed teams that interact with minimal management supervision.

       

      Servant Leadership

      Leaders collaborate with the team and do anything the team does when needed.

       

      Shu-Ha-Ri Model

      Originated in Japan as a way to understand learning and mastery, Shu – obeying the rules, Ha - consciously moving away from the rules, and Ri – consciously finding an individual path.

       

      Silo

      Work that is isolated.

       

      Social Media-Based Communication

      Communication used conveniently to receive instant feedback, ideas, and requirements from a particular community.

       

      Special Cause

      A cause that occurs once because of special reasons.

       

      Specification Breakdown

      This occurs when requirements for the specification are incomplete or conflicting.

       

      Spike

      An experiment that helps a team answer, a particular question and determine future actions.

       

      Sprint

      A consistent iteration that lasts from one week to one month in order to measure velocity in Scrum.

       

      Sprint Plan

      A document that explains sprint goals, tasks, and requirements and how the tasks will reach completion.

       

      Sprint Retrospective

      A team-member meeting that occurs after each sprint to evaluate the product and process to improve efficiency and effectiveness.

       

      Sprint Review

      A meeting that occurs after each sprint to show the product or process to stakeholders for approval and to receive feedback.

       

      Stakeholder

      An individual with an interest in the outcome.

       

      Stakeholder Management

      To ensure stakeholders remain informed and that the achievement of their needs are met.

       

      Standardized Test

      A curved test used to measure knowledge and understanding, but constructed so the same test-taker will perform similarly each time.

       

      Story Card

      An index card that displays the user story.

       

      Story Map

      A prioritization tool that backlogged stories made smaller and organized by user functionality.

       

      Story Point

      A unit of measurement to estimate the difficulty of a user story.

       

      Sustainability

      A maintainable pace of work that is intense yet steady.

       

      Swarming

      When the team collaborates to focus on a single user story.

       

      Tabaka’s Model

      A model originated in Japan to describe a team with values that include self-organization, empowered to make decisions, belief in vision and success, a committed team, trust, participatory decision making, consensus-driven, and construction disagreement.

       

      Tasks

      The smaller jobs to fulfill a user story, usually divided among team members.

       

      Team

      A group of individuals charged with the responsibility of delivery and value of a project.

       

      Teamwork

      Team members function in a way that is collaborative to complete tasks and reach a common goal, mostly achieved with strong communication.

       

      Team Empowerment

      A team that is empowered has collaboration, responsibility, and self-sufficiency.

       

      Team Formation

      Formation happens when a team creates ground rules and processes to build bonds and shared goals.

       

      Team Participation

      When the team discusses the requirements that will fulfill the customer’s needs.

       

      Team Space

      An area for team members to collocate, usually a physical location, in some cases a virtual location is created.

       

      Team Velocity

      The number of story points completed during iteration, and used to determine the planned capacity.

       

      Technical Debt

      Technical decisions a team chooses to not implement currently, but must do so or face difficulty in the future.

       

      Test-Driven Development (TDD)

      A written acceptance test for a module with the code built to pass the tests in order to ensure correct performance.

       

      Tester

      Explains acceptance test to the customers then consistently measures the product against the test and records results for the team. (XP Role)

       

      Theme

      A group of stories, iteration, or release’s idea determined by the customer and the team agrees with the idea.

       

      Time-boxing

      To set a fixed delivery date for a project or release.

       

      Tracker

      A role in XP that measures the team’s progress, and communicates the measurements to the team.

       

      Traditional Management

      A top-down approach that consists of long cycles, heavy planning, and minimal customer involvement.

       

      Transparency

      To show everyone’s involvement and progress to the entire team.

       

      Trend Analysis

      This analysis provides trends that will occur in the future to help control and implement continuous improvement.

       

      Two-Way Communication

      To allow communication between parties so their concerns and perspectives are given for effective feedback.

       

      Unit Testing

      These tests are used for continuous feedback to achieve quality improvement and assurance.

       

      Usability Testing

      An exploratory test which uses a test subject to understand the usability of software.

       

      Users Involvement

      The active involvement of users in the development cycle of a project so team members can receive feedback about the user’s requirements.

       

      User Story

      At least one business requirement that increases the value for the user.

       

      Validation

      The way to make sure that the product is acceptable to the customer.

       

      Value

      The worth of a product, project, or service.

       

      Value-Based Prioritization

      To allow the PO or customer determine which function to implement first based on the value it delivers.

       

      Value-Driven Delivery

      To realize the values needed to deliver a project.

       

      Value Stream Mapping

      A tool used to analyze a chain of processes with the desired outcome of eliminating waste.

       

      Variance

      The measurement of how far apart data is from each other.

       

      Velocity

      The total number of features that a team delivers in iteration.

       

      Verification

      To ensure the product meets requirements and specifications.

       

      Virtual Team

      A geographically distributed group that does not meet physically.

       

      Visibility

      The team’s work and progress must be transparent to all stakeholders.

       

      War Room

      A space where the team can work and collaborate effectively.

       

      Waterfall

      Resistant to change that requires heavy planning and sequential, traditional approach.

       

      Wide-Band Delphi Estimating

      An estimation technique for user stories. The PO presents user stories & discusses challenges. Each story’s estimates plotted, and then the team comes to an agreement on the range of points.

       

      WIP Limits

      To limit work-in-progress so a team can do the following: maintain focus on completing work, maintaining quality, and delivering value.

       

      Wireframe

      A lightweight non-functional UI design that shows the customer the vital elements and how they will interact before coding.

       

      WIP

      Work-In-Progress- Stories that have started, which are displayed in workflows to show progress and what still needs to be completed.

       

      Workflow

      A series of phases or stages the team has agreed to execute for a project.

       

      100-Point Method

      A method that allows customers to score (total 100 points) different features of a product.


      Key terms
      16:27

      Chapter quizzes will test your comprehension on what we've covered in this section.

      PMI-ACP Overview Quiz
      10 questions
      + Agile Principles and the PMI-ACP Mindset
      34 lectures 02:37:15

      In this lecture I’ll provide you with a quick overview of the PMI-ACP Domain: Agile Principles and Mindset. This lecture sets the stage for all the other lectures in this section. In this lecture we’ll quickly discuss what is the Agile Mindset and how it affects your ability to earn the PMI-ACP certification.

      We’ll also discuss the Agile Principles and how you must embrace these for exam success, but also for your success as an agile project manager.

      Overview of Domain I: Agile Principles and Mindset
      04:02

      What does it mean to have an Agile mindset? It means to think Agile, understand the change is welcome, and for many project managers, it’s a shift from the predictive approach project management utilizes in many fields.

      The agile project manager has several attributes that we’ll discuss in this lecture:

      Advocate for agile principles and values in the organization

      Ensure common understanding of agile principles

      Educate and influence agile

      Transparency equates to trust

      Safe environment for experimenting

      Defining Agile Values for Projects
      03:34

      Can you really create an Agile mindset? What if you come from a traditional predictive project management environment? Yes, but there may be some challenges. The approach to take is to first be open to the possibilities that there’s more than one way to manage a project.

      Second, knowledge work projects, like software development, are more conducive to agile project management than more end-driven projects like construction.

      In this lecture we’ll discuss the challenges you may have when first embracing agile project management – and what you’ll need to do for this exam objective. Let’s go!

      Managing Knowledge-Work Projects
      04:17

      In this lecture I’ll discuss empirical processes and defined processes. Agile (Scrum) really relies on empirical processes for transparency, inspections, and adaptation. You’ll need to be familiar with this concept for your PMI-ACP exam.

      Comparing Empirical Processes and Defined Processes
      03:25

      The PM Declaration of interdependence is a set of six management principles initially intended for project managers of Agile Software Development projects. Later on, the name was changed to "The declaration of interdependence for modern management", as it was realized that the principles might be applicable to other management situations. For your PMI-ACP exam, you’ll need to recognize these values.

      Exploring the Declaration of Interdependence
      05:19

      Embracing agile doesn’t happen overnight. It is a culture change for many – to be successful it needs support from the top; a consistent view of what agile means to your organization needs to socialized at all levels.

      Being Agile and Doing Agile
      04:03

      In this lecture we’ll examine the Triple Constraints of Project Management and how agile turns it all upside down. You’ll likely see this concept on your PMI-ACP exam.

      Inverting the Triple Constraints
      03:05

      Aaron De Smet, an agile leader, said, “Agility is the ability of an organization to renew itself, adapt, change quickly, and succeed in a rapidly changing, ambiguous, turbulent environment. Agility is not incompatible with stability—quite the contrary. Agility requires stability for most companies.” That’s what we’ll discuss in this lecture.

      Leading Organizational Agility
      02:35

      Thinking about agile practices is all about having the agile mindset – something you’ll need for the PMI-ACP exam. In this lecture we’ll dive into this concept of the agile mindset for your PMI-ACP exam.

      Thinking About Agile Practices
      02:35

      There is a difference between doing agile and being agile. In this lecture we’ll discuss doing agile, the mechanics of agile, and just create a good foundation for agile project management. This is also essential for your PMI-ACP exam, of course.

      Doing Agile Project Management
      02:50

      As part of your role as an agile project manager, you need to encourage others to embrace agile just as you have. Your PMI-ACP exam will test you on this concept of helping others and the organization to embrace agile.

      Encouraging Others to Embrace Agile
      03:33

      The PMI-ACP examination will test the concepts and approaches in the Agile Manifesto. You don’t need to memorize this document, but you should be very familiar with the philosophies of what the manifesto recommends.

      The Agile Manifesto is a proclamation of four key values and 12 guiding principles for managing software development projects. It’s a foundation for all that is Agile. In this lecture we’ll walk through the entire Agile Manifesto and see what you must know about this document to pass the PMI-ACP examination.

      Reviewing the Agile Manifesto
      03:17

      Can you really create an Agile mindset? What if you come from a traditional predictive project management environment? Yes, but there may be some challenges. The approach to take is to first be open to the possibilities that there’s more than one way to manage a project.

      Second, knowledge work projects, like software development, are more conducive to agile project management than more end-driven projects like construction.

      In this lecture we’ll discuss the challenges you may have when first embracing agile project management – and what you’ll need to do for this exam objective. Let’s go!

      Individuals and Interactions Over Processes and Tools
      03:16

      Another principle of the Agile Manifesto, which you’ll need to know for your PMI-ACP exam, is the concept of valuing working software over comprehensive documentation. The value in a project is in getting the project done.

      Working Software Over Comprehensive Documentation
      03:40

      This lecture is all about collaborating with the customer. Customer Collaboration Over Contract Negotiation is one of the four statements of the Agile Manifesto. Customer collaboration means the actual customer who is purchasing your solution or an internal customer who’ll use what the team creates. Let’s discuss this in more detail now.

      Customer Collaboration Over Contract Negotiation
      02:59

      The fourth value of Agile project management addresses the response to change. You know that change is welcome in agile projects and change is a valuable tool for creating great products. In this lecture, I’ll discuss this concept of the Agile Manifesto: responding to change over following a plan

      Responding to Change Over Following a Plan
      02:02

      The PMI-ACP examination will test the concepts and approaches in the Agile Manifesto. You don’t need to memorize this document, but you should be very familiar with the philosophies of what the manifesto recommends.

      The Agile Manifesto is a proclamation of four key values and 12 guiding principles for managing software development projects. It’s a foundation for all that is Agile. In this lecture we’ll walk through the entire Agile Manifesto and see what you must know about this document to pass the PMI-ACP examination.

      Twelve Principles of Agile
      04:49

      On the PMI-ACP examination you’ll have lots of questions on the Agile approaches to project management. Fortunately, the biggest methodology is also based on the Agile Manifesto, to some extent, and its components are not difficult to learn.

      Comparing Agile Project Management Approaches
      08:29

      On the PMI-ACP examination you’ll have lots of questions on the Agile approaches to project management. Fortunately, the biggest methodology is also based on the Agile Manifesto, to some extent, and its components are not difficult to learn.

      In this lecture I’ll discuss Scrum in agile project management. Specifically, we’ll look at:

      Scrum is easy to understand, but can be difficult to master

      Scrum is a rugby term

      Scrum uses a methodology called the scrum framework

      The scrum framework is a set of practices, roles and responsibilities, events, artifacts, and rules

      Introducing Scrum
      16:46

      Kanban (pronounced like Con Bon) is a Japanese word meaning signboard. It’s a great tool to show what’s in queue, what the team is working on, and what’s moving through the other stages of your software development life cycle. In this lecture, I’ll talk all about KanBan and what you need to know for your PMI-ACP exam.

      All About Kanban
      04:20

      Another flavor of agile project management is eXtreme Programming, also known as XP. XP has some similarities to Scrum, but there are a few different terms and approaches to how XP works. In this lecture we discuss how XP works and what you’ll need to know for the PMI-ACP examination.

      We will discuss several topics, including:

      XP core values

      XP project team roles

      XP practices

      Refactoring code in an XP environment

      Extreme Programming
      13:33

      For your PMI-ACP examination you’ll also need to know about Lean and how its characteristics have been incorporated into knowledge work projects like software development. You will have a few questions on lean, but primarily on its core principles.

      In this lecture we will discuss:

      Lean core concepts

      Seven wastes of lean

      The principles of Kanban

      Little’s Law

      Lean Product Development
      04:43

      You need to know and recognize DSDM as an Agile method that focuses on the project lifecycle.  This approach was created in 1994, after project managers using RAD (Rapid Application Development) sought more governance and discipline to this new iterative way of working. In this lecture we’ll explore DSDM and how it works.

      Dynamic Systems Development Method
      04:11

      In this lecture I’ll discuss Feature-Driven Development and why it’s important for the PMI-ACP exam. When it is produced well, FDD can offer timely status reports and accurate progress tracking based on all levels of leadership in the project.

      Feature-Driven Development
      02:37

      There are a few other “flavors” of agile project management that you’ll need to be familiar with for your PMI-ACP examination. Don’t worry – these are easy and you want have tons of questions on these lesser-known agile project management practices. In this lecture we’ll discuss Crystal Agile Project Management.

      Introducing Crystal
      02:16

      So what does agile project management look like when it’s actually being implemented? In this lecture we’ll examine just that: the mechanics managing a project with agile. Specifically we’ll address several things you’ll need to know for your PMI-ACP examination:

      • Product vision
      • Creating the product roadmap
      • Release planning
      • Iteration planning
      • Daily scrums
      • Sprint reviews
      • Sprint retrospectives

      There are lots of terms in this lecture, so pay close attention. You may want to watch this lecture more than once (hint!)

      Leading an Agile Project
      12:31

      So what does agile project management look like when it’s actually being implemented? In this lecture we’ll examine just that: the mechanics managing a project with agile. Specifically we’ll address several things you’ll need to know for your PMI-ACP examination:

      • Product vision
      • Creating the product roadmap
      • Release planning
      • Iteration planning
      • Daily scrums
      • Sprint reviews
      • Sprint retrospectives

      There are lots of terms in this lecture, so pay close attention. You may want to watch this lecture more than once (hint!)

      Management and Leadership in Agile
      06:54

      One of the biggest themes on the PMI-ACP examination is that you, the project manager, take a servant leadership role. This can be a big adjustment if you’ve worked in environments where you’ve taken more of a command-and-control approach. In agile, the focus is on the team while the agile project manager supports the team.

      In this lecture I’ll discuss how:

      The recognition is on the team members not the project manager or coach or ScrumMaster

      The team gets the work done

      The team adds value

      Servant leaders provide what team members need

      Serving as a Leader
      04:06

      Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

      PMI-ACP Coach
      02:31

      Team members need a safe environment to experiment, try innovative approaches, and to fail fast. In this lecture I’ll discuss the concept of creating a safe and trustful environment for the development team. You’ll want to know this for your PMI-ACP exam.

      Create a Safe and Trustful Team Environment
      03:54

      (NULL) In this assignment you’ll work through a case study to find efficient and effective ways or working in an agile project. You’ll consider the project manager, the project team, the product owner, and the shared vision of the project.

      Experiment to Find Efficient And Effective Ways Of Working (NULL)
      06:15

      When we think of leading the project we often think of the role of the project manager. While the project manager does take up the initial leadership role, emergent leadership means that anyone can lead on the project.

      Encourage Emergent Leadership
      02:21
      In this assignment you’ll work through a case study to define the roles and responsibilities in an agile project. You can use whatever resources you have available to help with this work.
      Assignment: Roles and Responsibilities
      10 questions
      Agile Principles and Mindset Learning Game
      00:04

      Great job finishing up this section on the Agile Principles and Mindset. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

      This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

      Section Summary
      02:23

      This quiz will test your comprehension of what we've covered in this section.

      Agile Mindset Quiz
      10 questions
      + Value-Driven Delivery
      43 lectures 02:30:44

      Value-driven delivery is a theme of the agile project management approach. In this overview video I’ll introduce this topic and help you onto the value freeway. If you want to embrace an overall strategy for passing the PMI-ACP examination, value-driven delivery is key.

      This is a big, big component of the exam, so you’ll want to pay close attention to these topics. Let’s hop in and get going on redeeming and creating value for your stakeholders in this section.

      Overview of Domain II: Value-Driven Delivery
      02:47

      In this lecture we’ll discuss the PMI-ACP examination domain of Value-Driven Delivery. This domain accounts for 20 percent of your exam – roughly 24 exam questions. Lots of test questions on this information, so pay close attention to this domain.

      We will review:

      Tasks for value-driven delivery

      How to delivery value early in the project

      The ongoing practice of removing waste

      Delivering Value in Agile Projects
      02:48

      Assessing value is part of the agile project management approach. In this lecture we’ll discuss what value – and anti-value – is to the project manager. We’ll look at some formulas for understanding value from both the agile project manager’s perspective and the stakeholders’ perspective.

      In this lecture we’ll also review the earned value management formulas. Don’t worry – you’ll likely not have many of these formulas on the PMI-ACP examination.

      Creating Value ASAP
      02:50

      For your PMI-ACP exam, you need to be familiar with the concept of removing waste from a project. In this lecture we’ll identify the non-value added activities that are wasteful and discuss some strategies for removing waste from our projects.

      Removing Waste
      03:07

      Prioritizing Value is paramount for agile projects. Think about a construction project, until the project is completely done you don’t realize any value. In knowledge-work projects, such as software development, you can have intermittent releases that provide some value to the customers while continuing to work on less-valuable components.

      In this lecture we’ll explore the concept of value-driven delivery and why it’s so important for agile project management and the PMI-ACP examination.

      Defining Value in Organizations
      03:50

      Incremental delivery is all about delivery value as early as possible. As we’ve already discussed, you’ll prioritize the requirements with the product owner, and then work to deliver those high priority items first.

      In this lecture we’ll continue that conversation on these topics:

      The team regularly deploys working increments

      Usually to a test environment for evaluation

      This is an opportunity for an early return on investment

      Exploring the Time Value of Money
      04:24

      Assessing value is part of the agile project management approach. In this lecture we’ll discuss what value – and anti-value – is to the project manager. We’ll look at some formulas for understanding value from both the agile project manager’s perspective and the stakeholders’ perspective.

      In this lecture we’ll also review the earned value management formulas. Don’t worry – you’ll likely not have many of these formulas on the PMI-ACP examination.

      Introducing Earned Value Management
      12:11

      In this lecture we’ll discuss the concept of agile project accounting:

      Agile accounting defines the economic models of agile projects

      Project work and smaller chunks of a larger project

      Smaller chunks of work are less risky

      Accountability of invested in relation to the ROI

      Agile Project Accounting
      05:06

      Agile projects utilize key performance indicators to show performance and track metrics. Key performance indicators are metrics to show how well the project is performing. Consider:

      Rate of progress

      Remaining work

      Likely completion date

      Likely cost remaining

      Creating Key Performance Indicators
      03:08

      Managing Threats and Issues is a task within this PMI-ACP examination domain. In PMP land, risks can be positive or negative. In agile projects, however, we only look at risk as being negative. It’s a threat to the project success.

      In this lecture we’re going to focus on three primary concepts:

      Risk is considered anti value

      Goal is to attack high-risk items early in the project

      Items with the greatest value in greatest risk move to the top of the backlog

      Know these themes for your PMI-ACP examination.

      Managing Risks in Agile Projects
      05:39

      For your PMI-ACP exam, regulations are requirements. Regulatory compliance is one instance for documentation where just because is utilized. These are the two details covered in this quick lecture.

      Adhering to Regulatory Compliance in Agile
      03:13

      Prioritizing Value is paramount for agile projects. Think about a construction project, until the project is completely done you don’t realize any value. In knowledge-work projects, such as software development, you can have intermittent releases that provide some value to the customers while continuing to work on less-valuable components.

      In this lecture we’ll explore the concept of value-driven delivery and why it’s so important for agile project management and the PMI-ACP examination.

      Prioritizing Value in Agile Projects
      03:40

      Incremental delivery is all about delivery value as early as possible. As we’ve already discussed, you’ll prioritize the requirements with the product owner, and then work to deliver those high priority items first.

      In this lecture we’ll continue that conversation on these topics:

      • The team regularly deploys working increments
      • Usually to a test environment for evaluation
      • This is an opportunity for an early return on investment


        Deliver High-Value Requirements First
        03:24

        When it comes to Agile, MoSCoW isn’t a place. Made popular by DSDM, MoSCoW means:

        Must have

        Should have

        Could have

        Would like to have, but not this time

        Utilizing MoSCoW
        01:57
        In this exercise you’ll review a case study and then utilize the MoSCoW approach for prioritizing requirements. Let’s get to it!
        Assignment: Using MoSCoW
        3 questions

        For your PMI-ACP exam, you’ll need to be familiar with Kano Analysis. Specifically:

        Delighters exciters

        Satisfiers

        Dissatisfiers

        Indifferent 

        Using Kano Analysis
        05:29

        Let’s connect some dots… no, that’s not what this lecture is about. Dot voting gives stakeholders a predetermined amount of dots. Dots are assigned to the business features to vote on the requirements. Dots could be check marks or stickers. This is also known as “dotmocracy.”

        How to do Dot Voting
        03:57

        For your PMI-ACP exam, you’ll need to know all about Monopoly Money. With this voting approach, stakeholders receive monopoly money equal to the amount of the project budget. The monopoly money is distributed among the system features. This approach is most effective when it’s limited to prioritizing business features. 

        Spending Monopoly Money
        01:58

        This voting method is similar to dot voting. Each stakeholder is allotted 100 points for voting. The points are assigned to the most important requirements by the stakeholders. Let’s discuss this approach in more detail now.

        Trying the 100-Point Method
        02:53

        For your PMI-ACP exam, know these factors for setting requirements prioritization:

        Value – business benefit

        Cost – expense versus ROI

        Risk – riskiest requirements first

        Difficulty of implementation – safest first

        Success factors – high probability of success

        Regulatory compliance – laws and regulations

        Relationship to other requirements – linked to other requirements

        Stakeholder agreement – consensus on requirement

        Urgency – time-sensitive requirement

        Setting Requirements Prioritization
        02:35

        This lecture is all about the product backlog and how the requirements are ranked by the product owner the project team. Know these factors for you PMI-ACP exam:

        List of all requirements

        Prioritized with product owner

        Priorities can change with each grooming

        Priorities don’t change during the iteration

        Relative Prioritization and Ranking
        03:27

        For your exam, know that the team regularly deploys working increments. Initial releases usually are to a test environment for evaluation. The evaluation of the increment is an opportunity for an early return on investment.

        Delivering Value in Increments
        05:12

        In agile projects change is welcome and accepted. Change is least expensive at the start of the project. Change increases as product functionality increases. Change is expected, but can be expensive – and timely. Let’s discuss this in more detail now.

        Reviewing the Cost of Change
        03:08

        Want to be an MVP for your PMI-ACP exam? Know these facts about the minimum viable product:

        Complete enough to be useful

        Small enough that it does not represent the entire project

        Also known as the minimal marketable feature

        Barebones essentials of a product

        Creating the MVP
        01:44

        Agile projects should embrace low-tech/high-touch tools. Examples include:

        • Cards 
        • Charts 
        • Information radiator 
        • Tools that promote communication and collaboration
        • Tools that promote learning and knowledge transfer
        Embracing Low-Tech/High-Touch Tools
        02:53
        Value and Validation
        16:06

        In this lecture we’ll talk a bit more about the KanBan tool, also known as a task board.

        Help teams monitor the work in progress. This is part of the transparent communication requirement for agile projects; something you’ll want to know for the PMI-ACP exam.

        Creating Kanban Boards
        02:00

        In this lecture we’ll talk a bit more about making a task board, also known as a KanBan or task board.

        Help teams monitor the work in progress. This is part of the transparent communication requirement for agile projects; something you’ll want to know for the PMI-ACP exam.

        Making a Task Board
        02:38
        Now it’s your turn to do some hands-on work. In this assignment you will create a KanBan board for a project team. Read the case study and get to work!
        Assignment: Creating a Sign Board
        4 questions

        Managing work in progress (WIP) is a constant them in agile projects – and for your PMI-ACP exam. You need to know what the WIP is, how to manage the WIP, and some other attributes I’ll discuss in this lecture.

        Setting the WIP Limit
        04:14

        Null

        Exploring Little’s Law
        02:38

        Contracting can be difficult in agile project management. You’ll deal with sellers who want to balance time, cost, and the scope the contracted work. But you also have to deal with uncertainties of change and a developing project scope in agile project management.

        In this lecture we’ll discuss the challenges of contracts in agile project management and how you, the agile project manager can overcome these challenges.

        Working with Vendors In Agile Projects
        03:57

        We discussed DSDM earlier in the course. In this lecture we’ll continue that concept and see how a variation of the approach works with contracting. This is part of customer collaboration over contracts, so pay attention to this for your PMI-ACP exam.

        Introducing DSDM Contracting
        02:28

        In this lecture I’ll discuss these items:

        • Both parties share some of the risk and reward 
        • If a vendor delivers on-time they get paid for their work at the hourly rate 
        • If the vendor delivers early they get paid for their work but at a higher hourly rate
        • If the vendor delivers late they get paid for their work but at a lower hourly rate
        Graduated Fixed Priced Contracts
        02:31

        For the PMI-ACP exam, know all about fixed-price work packages. This approach keeps the price of the work constant. Individual work packages are estimated for cost. Changes to the scope reflect a new estimate for those work packages.

        Fixed-Price Work Packages
        02:50

        The PMI-ACP exam will test your knowledge of how to validate projects and the products they create for value. Value, business value, is an important concept for the PMI-ACP exam, so really know everything about project value.

        Validating Value in Agile Projects
        02:18

        Software must be tested and verified before it can be released to the organization. In this lecture, I’ll discuss this process and how to apply the information for your PMI-ACP exam.

        Software Testing and Verification
        02:53

        Exploratory testing allows the tester freedom to explore. The tester aims to discover issues and unexpected behavior. The tester explores the software. This approach is in addition to scripted testing. 

        Exploratory Testing
        01:56

        For your PMI-ACP exam you’ll need to answer three concerns about usability testing and its goals:

        • How will a user respond to the system under realistic conditions?
        • How easy is it to use the system?
        • What improvements need to be made for usability?
        Usability Testing
        02:25

        The PMI-ACP exam will test your understanding of continuous integration. You’ll need to know:

        Incorporate new and changed code into the code repository

        Small code commits

        Frequent integration

        Relies on automated tools to integrate code when new code is checked in

        Implementing Continuous Integration
        02:34

        When it comes to test-driven development, it’s all about writing, developing, testing, and cleaning. Specifically:

        Also called test first development

        Test are written before the code is written

        Nunit

        Junit

        Code is developed and edited until the code passes all tests

        Refactoring is the final step to clean up the code 

        Working with Test-Driven Development
        01:44

        Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

        PMI-ACP Coach
        02:20

        Know these four steps of Acceptance Test-Driven Development for the PMI-ACP exam:

        • Discuss the requirements – developers as the product owner questions that are designed to gather acceptance criteria 
        • Distill test in a framework friendly format – gets the test ready to be entered into the acceptance test tool 
        • Developed the code and run the test – test initially fail because the code hasn’t been written completely
        • Demo – with automated acceptance testing scrips and demonstrations of the software
        Acceptance Test-Driven Development
        01:58
        Value-Driven Delivery Learning Game
        00:04

        You did it! Great job finishing up this section on delivery value in agile projects. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

        This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

        Section Summary
        01:50

        This quiz will test your comprehension of what we've covered in this section for the PMI-ACP exam.

        Value-Driven Delivery Quiz
        10 questions
        + Stakeholder Engagement
        38 lectures 01:48:09

        If you’re a PMP or CAPM you’re probably already familiar with stakeholder management and its new chapters in the PMBOK Guide, fifth edition. If you’re not, don’t worry – this chapter will walk you through stakeholder management from an agile project manager’s point of view.

        In this overview, I’ll introduce stakeholder management and its importance in the PMI-ACP examination. We’ll get started with a talk about agile project management and the role of the project stakeholders.

        Overview of Domain III: Stakeholder Engagement
        03:36

        Stakeholder management on the PMI-ACP examination accounts for 17 percent of the exam. That’s roughly 20 exam questions! Know stakeholder management, an easier topic for experienced project managers, and you’ll be on your way to exam success.

        In this lecture I’ll discuss:

        • Working with the project stakeholders 
        • Establishing a shared vision 
        • Creating collaboration 
        • Communicating with project stakeholders 
        • Using interpersonal skills

        Leading Stakeholder Stewardship
        03:54

        Projects are about getting things done, about creating value. Stakeholder values can be anything they find important for the project to create, the schedule of the project, and, of course, the project budget.

        In this lecture we’ll continue our conversation about value, but we’ll continue it in light of the project stakeholders.

        Defining Stakeholder Values
        02:26

        What does it mean to have an Agile mindset? It means to think Agile, understand the change is welcome, and for many project managers, it’s a shift from the predictive approach project management utilizes in many fields.

        The agile project manager has several attributes that we’ll discuss in this lecture:

        • Advocate for agile principles and values in the organization
        • Ensure common understanding of agile principles
        • Educate and influence agile
        • Transparency equates to trust
        • Safe environment for experimenting
        Defining Community Values
        02:25

        Stakeholder management on the PMI-ACP examination accounts for 17 percent of the exam. That’s roughly 20 exam questions! Know stakeholder management, an easier topic for experienced project managers, and you’ll be on your way to exam success.

        In this lecture I’ll discuss:

        • Working with the project stakeholders 
        • Establishing a shared vision 
        • Creating collaboration 
        • Communicating with project stakeholders
        • Using interpersonal skills
        Managing Stakeholder Engagement
        02:39

        If you’re a PMP or CAPM you’re probably already familiar with stakeholder management and its new chapters in the PMBOK Guide, fifth edition. If you’re not, don’t worry – this chapter will walk you through stakeholder management from an agile project manager’s point of view.

        In this overview, I’ll introduce stakeholder management and its importance in the PMI-ACP examination. We’ll get started with a talk about agile project management and the role of the project stakeholders.

        Identifying Project Stakeholders
        03:24

        For your PMI-ACP exam, you want a mindset, and attitude, of getting stakeholders involved in the project. Collaboration is stakeholder synergy – a sense of ownership of the project, a sense of community for achieving the goals of the project through agile project management.

        Building Stakeholder Synergy
        03:46

        Once you have stakeholders involved you want to work to keep them involved. Much of this is you and the team following-through on conversations, promises, remaining transparent in the project, and following the principles of agile project management.

        Keeping Stakeholders Involved
        04:04

        It’s been said that communications is 90 percent of project manager’s time. When you consider all of the people and all of the things you have to communicate with and about it’s easy to believe that statistic.

        In this lecture we’ll examine communications in agile project management and how you go about communicating with the project stakeholders. In this lecture we will discuss:

        • Communication requirements analysis 
        • Communication technology 
        • Communication model 
        • Communication methods
        • Create the communications management plan
        Leading Stakeholder Conversations
        03:07

        As an agile project manager you need to have a shared vision of the project with your stakeholders. This means that you and your customers, project team, product owner, and even vendors all understand the goals and priorities of the project.

        In this lecture I’ll discuss creating and maintaining the shared project vision. We’ll also look at:

        • Defining what done means in agile project management
        • Working with agile modeling
        • Use case diagrams
        • Screen diagrams
        • Wireframes
        • User personas

        Sharing the Project Vision
        03:39

        You know what the project charter is and what it does: It authorizes the project and allows the project manager to assign resources to the project work. It’s all about power. The project manager is officially identified in the project charter, though the project manager should be selected as early as possible during the project—hopefully while the charter is being developed, but must be identified before project planning commences. The project charter also demonstrates the organization’s commitment to the project and the investment in the endeavor.

        Creating the Project Charter
        02:38
        In this exercise you’ll try your hand at creating a project charter for a case study project. The project manager doesn’t issue the project charter. Nope. The project charter comes from outside of the project. The project manager may help develop the project charter, but it’s not signed or issued by
        Assignment: Creating a Charter
        4 questions

        It’s important to define what equates to done in an agile project. You don’t want the project to continue on and on – and you don’t want the project team and the stakeholders to lose focus of what the project is aiming to accomplish.

        Defining Done in Agile Projects
        02:28

        Modeling an agile project can save time and help you and the development team more clearly communicate the goals and tactics of a project. For you PMI-ACP exam, know what agile modeling is and how it can save time on your project.

        Modeling an Agile Project
        04:21

        A use case diagram shows how people and systems interact with one another. In this lecture I’ll discuss a use case and show the different components you may have to recognize on your PMI-ACP exam.

        Use Case Diagrams
        02:40

        Data models are tools you can use to structure your data. In this lecture we’ll talk about data models and why you may need on in an agile project. Let’s go!

        Leveraging Data Models
        02:35

        The user interface, the screen design, is an important aspect of any software development project. In this lecture we’ll discuss how screen designs can serve as a quick prototype of what the project is creating and how it can save time and better understand the project requirements.

        Knowing Wireframes
        01:48

        Wireframes sound technical, but they’re not. Maybe you’ve seen an artist use a wireframe to make the basic shape of a statue prior to all the hard work. That’s the same idea here. Wireframes show the intent of the project and they can be computer-generated wireframes or even hand drawn.

        Meeting Personas
        02:05

        It’s been said that communications is 90 percent of project manager’s time. When you consider all the people and all of the things you have to communicate with and about it’s easy to believe that statistic.

        In this lecture we’ll examine communications in agile project management and how you go about communicating with the project stakeholders. In this lecture we will discuss:

        • Communication requirements analysis 
        • Communication technology 
        • Communication model 
        • Communication methods 
        • Create the communications management plan

        Communicating with Stakeholders
        08:20
        Leading Face-to-Face Communication
        02:24
        Sharing Knowledge with Stakeholders
        02:17
        Building an Information Radiator
        01:49

        Collaboration is another key topic in agile project management. Right from the Agile Manifesto we saw the idea of collaboration: Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.

        In this lecture I’ll discuss the benefits of collaboration:

        • Generates wiser decisions
        • Promotes problem solving
        • Promotes action 
        • Build social capital 
        • Ownership of collective problems

        Collaborating with Stakeholders
        02:20
        Creating Green and Red Zones
        03:09
        Hosting a Workshop
        02:37
        Brainstorming Ideas
        03:25
        Playing Collaboration Games
        03:06
        Defining Soft Skills for Agile Projects
        02:25

        A big part of stakeholder management is your interpersonal skills in agile project management. This means you have to have emotional intelligence and listening skills. This ties back to our conversation about communications management and the importance of communicating with, not to, the project stakeholders.

        In this lecture we’ll discuss:

        • Four quadrants of emotional intelligence
        • Active listening
        • Internal listening
        • Focused listening
        • Global listening

        We’ll also discuss conflict resolution, decision-making, and shared collaboration.

        Basics of Emotional Intelligence
        02:43
        How to Listen Actively and Effectively
        02:40
        Facilitating Meetings
        02:46
        Negotiating with Stakeholders
        02:50
        Resolving Conflicts
        02:42
        Making Good Project Decisions
        01:58
        Empowering the Project Team
        02:29
        Making Decisions as a Group
        02:11
        Stakeholder Engagement Learning Game
        00:04

        Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

        PMI-ACP Coach
        02:25

        You’re making great progress in this course!

        You’ve finished section on stakeholder management in agile projects. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

        This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

        Section Summary
        01:54

        This quiz will test what you've learned on stakeholder engagement.

        Stakeholder Engagement Quiz
        10 questions
        + Team Performance
        25 lectures 01:15:32

        As the agile project manager you need a servant leader approach to the project team. This doesn’t mean, however, that the team runs over you in the project. This section deals with promoting team performance and your role as the servant leader.

        For your exam, you’ll need to know about team performance and what steps you can take to promote team performance. Let’s dig into this section on team performance in agile project management.

        Overview of Domain IV: Team Performance
        03:23

        This lecture is all about the team performance exam domain. This exam domain is worth 16 percent of the PMI-ACP examination. That is roughly 19 exam questions on how you can facilitate building high-performing teams.

        In this lecture we’ll cover:

        • Develop team rules and processes to foster buy in
        • Help grow team interpersonal and technical skills
        • Use generalizing specialist
        • Empower and encourage emergent leadership 
        • Learn team motivators and demotivators

        Valuing People Over Processes
        03:08

        On the PMI-ACP examination you’ll be faced with 19 exam questions about agile team management. In this lecture we’ll discuss one of the most important concepts of this exam domain: building agile teams.

        In this lecture we’re going to take a deep look at:

        • Create a shared vision for the project team 
        • Set realistic goals 
        • Limit team size to 12 or fewer people 
        • Build a sense of team identity 
        • Provide strong leadership

        Defining the Delivery Team
        02:35

        In this section we’re going to discuss the process of agile project management that you should look for improvements within. We’ll also look at how the product owner and the project team work together to find improvement opportunities in the product the project is creating. We’ll also look at how the project team and the agile project manager can seek out opportunities to improve the people involved in the project.

        Identifying the Product Owner
        03:03
        Responsibility of the Team Leader
        02:16
        Recognizing the Project Sponsor
        02:26
        Forming the Agile Project Team
        02:56
        Working with Generalizing Specialists
        02:12

        This lecture is all about the team performance exam domain. This exam domain is worth 16 percent of the PMI-ACP examination. That is roughly 19 exam questions on how you can facilitate building high-performing teams.

        Building a High-Performing Team
        03:10
        Developing the Project Team
        03:31
        Leading the Project Team
        03:48
        Providing Motivation
        05:34
        Training the Project Team
        04:53
        Coaching Team Members
        03:45
        Building a Collaborative Team Space
        02:18

        What does it mean to be collocated? It means the project team works in one location throughout the project. You might call this area your “war room” or commons area, but it’s an area that’s just for the project team to be isolated and focused on the project work.

        In this lecture we’ll discuss:

        • Collocated project teams
        • How to create a team space
        • Caves and common areas
        • Tacit knowledge
        • Osmotic communications
        • Managing distributed teams

        Working with Co-Located Teams
        01:54
        Defining the Project Team Space
        02:16
        Identifying Osmotic Communications
        02:01
        Managing Team Diversity
        02:48
        Working with Distributed Teams
        03:27

        In this lecture of the PMI-ACP examination domain we’ll discuss tracking team performance. This is all about ensuring the project team is delivering on their promises and commitments to the project stakeholders.

        In this lecture we’ll discuss burndown and burnup charts, team velocity, and calculating completion time. This is a quick and easy lecture – let’s knock it out right now!

        Monitoring Team Performance
        05:35

        In this lecture we’ll discuss the concept of a burnup chart and a burn down chart. This is something you’ll want to know for your PMI-ACP exam – and for your role as an agile project manager. Pay attention to the concept – I expect you’ll see this on your PMI-ACP exam.

        Building Burn Charts
        03:19

        Now we’ll discuss tracking team performance. This is all about ensuring the project team is delivering on their promises and commitments to the project stakeholders.

        In this lecture we’ll discuss burndown and burnup charts, team velocity, and calculating completion time. This is a quick and easy lecture – let’s knock it out right now!

        Calculating Team Velocity
        03:34
        Team Performance Learning Game
        00:04

        Great job finishing up this section on managing agile project teams. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

        This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

        Section Summary
        01:36

        This quiz will test you on the team performance topics from this section.

        Team Performance Quiz
        10 questions
        + Adaptive Planning
        30 lectures 01:31:12

        Welcome to the adaptive planning PMI-ACP examination domain. This lecture is a brief overview of what adaptive planning and our goals for this section of the course. In this section we’ll cover three important adaptive planning subdomains:

        • Levels of planning
        • Adaptation
        • Estimation
        • Velocity/throughput/cycle time

        Let’s get started on this section by completing this lecture overview right now.

        Overview of Domain V: Adaptive Planning
        04:12

        Adaptive planning is a smaller PMI-ACP examination domain; it is worth 12 percent of the exam. This exam domain will challenge you with 14 exam questions – that’s 14 questions in your favor if you grasp this information!

        There are some key tasks for adaptive planning you should be familiar with for the PMI-ACP examination:

        • Progressive elaboration and rolling wave planning 
        • Transparent planning and key stakeholders 
        • Managing expectations by refining plans
        • Adjusting planning cadence based on project factors and results 
        • Inspect and adapt the plans to changing events 
        • Size items first independently of team velocity 
        • Adjust capacity for maintenance and operations demands to update estimates 
        • Start planning with high-level scope schedule and cost range estimates 
        • Refine ranges as the project progresses 
        • Use actuals to refine the estimate to complete

        Agile Planning Concepts
        04:28

        Adaptive planning is different than predictive-type projects. In predictive projects the entire plan and concept is known before the project work begins. In agile projects, we expect changes to happen, so the entire plan isn’t known when the work begins.

        There are five takeaways in this lecture:

        • Agile projects are value-driven 
        • Minimize non-value-added work 
        • Plan to replan 
        • Early plans are necessary, but they’re likely flawed
        • Uncertainty requires replanning

        Adaptive Planning
        03:10

        Adaptive planning is a smaller PMI-ACP examination domain; it is worth 12 percent of the exam. This exam domain will challenge you with 14 exam questions – that’s 14 questions in your favor if you grasp this information!

        There are some key tasks for adaptive planning you should be familiar with for the PMI-ACP examination:

        • Progressive elaboration and rolling wave planning 
        • Transparent planning and key stakeholders 
        • Managing expectations by refining plans
        • Adjusting planning cadence based on project factors and results 
        • Inspect and adapt the plans to changing events 
        • Size items first independently of team velocity 
        • Adjust capacity for maintenance and operations demands to update estimates 
        • Start planning with high-level scope schedule and cost range estimates 
        • Refine ranges as the project progresses
        • Use actuals to refine the estimate to complete
        Agile and Non-Agile Planning Activities
        02:51

        Adaptive planning is different than predictive-type projects. In predictive projects the entire plan and concept is known before the project work begins. In agile projects, we expect changes to happen, so the entire plan isn’t known when the work begins.

        There are five takeaways in this lecture:

        • Agile projects are value-driven 
        • Minimize non-value-added work 
        • Plan to replan 
        • Early plans are necessary, but they’re likely flawed
        • Uncertainty requires replanning
        Principles of Agile Planning
        07:12
        Agile Discovery
        03:22
        Leading Progressive Elaboration
        03:14
        Value-Based Analysis
        04:18
        Timeboxing Meetings and Events
        03:27

        Estimating and sizing an agile project can be tricky, but there are some approaches you can take in your project management practice. In this lecture we’ll discuss these approaches for sizing and estimating agile projects.

        There are three consistent themes in estimating and sizing an agile project:

        • Not as precise as predictive planning 
        • More uncertainty and agile projects 
        • Include a range of variance

        Creating Estimate Ranges
        03:10
        Working with Ideal Time
        02:43
        User Stories
        05:58
        In this assignment you'll create some user stories for the Shopper App Case Study.
        Assignment: Writing User Stories
        2 questions
        Creating the User Story Backlog
        02:25

        Estimating and sizing an agile project can be tricky, but there are some approaches you can take in your project management practice. In this lecture we’ll discuss these approaches for sizing and estimating agile projects.

        There are three consistent themes in estimating and sizing an agile project:

        • Not as precise as predictive planning
        • More uncertainty and agile projects
        • Include a range of variance
        User Stories: Sizing, Estimating, and Planning
        04:02
        Breaking Down the Project
        06:29
        Grooming the Backlog
        01:36
        Utilizing Affinity Estimating
        02:36
        Sizing T-Shirts
        01:45
        Creating a Product Roadmap
        01:51
        Using Wideband Delphi
        02:06
        Planning with Poker
        02:14

        You and the project team will work with the product owner and other stakeholders to define the release and iterations of the project deliverables. In this lecture we’ll discuss how best to plan iterations and releases in an agile project.

        So much of this conversation is based on visioning, a part of high-level planning:

        • Prior to planning the first release 
        • Mapping out the overall effort of the project
        • Product owner and sponsor
        • Key team members
        • Other major stakeholders

        Creating Release and Iteration Plans
        01:58
        Using Spikes
        01:39
        Visioning the Releases
        01:53
        Planning for Releases
        02:42
        Planning Project Iterations
        04:04
        Completing Daily Stand-Ups
        01:39
        Adaptive Planning Learning Game
        00:04

        Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

        PMI-ACP Coach
        01:38

        That’s the end of this section on adaptive planning. While this section was short (and hopefully easy) don’t underestimate it for the PMI-ACP examination. If you really know this short and easy section you’ll have 14 questions in your favor.

        In this wrap-up video we’ll review these three concepts:

        • Adaptive planning
        • Project sizing and estimating
        • Planning for releases and iterations

        Section Summary
        02:26

        This is a quiz on the topics from this section on Adaptive Planning.

        Adaptive Planning Quiz
        10 questions
        + Problem Detection and Resolution
        20 lectures 01:09:08

        Problem Detection and Resolution is an important part of the agile project manager’s roles and responsibilities. This exam domain will account for just 10 percent of the PMI-ACP examination. That’s 12 questions where you’ll need to recognize problems, issues, or approaches to resolving these issues.

        There are four tasks that you’ll be tested on the PMI-ACP examination within this domain:

        • Create a safe an open environment to surface problems 
        • Engage team in resolving threats and issues 
        • Resolve issues or reset expectations 
        • Maintain a visible list of threats and issues 
        • Maintain a threat list and add threat remediation efforts to the backlog

        Overview of Domain VI: Problem Detection and Resolution
        02:23

        This lecture is an overview of the problems, issues, and detection in agile project management. In this lecture I’ll introduce the five tasks you need to know for the PMI-ACP examination. As an agile project manager you will work with your project team and stakeholder to seek out problems and issues.

        Part of this domain is creating a safe space where people feel that they can experiment without ramifications if they fail. This is an important part of the PMI-ACP exam concept – fail fast, but learn from the failure.

        Let’s hop in and explore these topics right now!

        Controlling Project Problems
        03:38

        Problem Detection and Resolution is an important part of the agile project manager’s roles and responsibilities. This exam domain will account for just 10 percent of the PMI-ACP examination. That’s 12 questions where you’ll need to recognize problems, issues, or approaches to resolving these issues.

        There are four tasks that you’ll be tested on the PMI-ACP examination within this domain:

        • Create a safe an open environment to surface problems 
        • Engage team in resolving threats and issues 
        • Resolve issues or reset expectations 
        • Maintain a visible list of threats and issues
        • Maintain a threat list and add threat remediation efforts to the backlog
        Cost of Change
        02:28

        In this lecture we’ll discuss the types of problems that can affect an agile project. We’ll look at several things and how you might go about finding a resolution in your agile project. In this lecture we’re going to review these topics:

        • Issues and risks
        • Financial impact of project problems
        • The timeline of where issues are discovered
        • Reviewing technical debt and agile projects
        • Creating a safe environment for the project team
        • Success modes and failure modes
        • Creating success strategies
        Reviewing Technical Debt
        02:40
        Create a Safe and Open Environment
        02:17

        There’s a logical approach to detecting problems in agile projects: ask the project team. This is actually a core piece of the daily standup meeting: Are there any impediments blocking your way? You’ll ask that question everyday for each project team member on the agile project.

        In this lecture we’ll examine that topic, but we’ll also look at:

        • Lead time and cycle time
        • Managing work in progress (WIP)
        • Defect cycle time
        • Causes of variances
        • Trend analysis

        Failure and Success Modes in a Project
        02:14
        Strategies for Success
        03:17

        In this lecture we’ll discuss the types of problems that can affect an agile project. We’ll look at several things and how you might go about finding a resolution in your agile project. In this lecture we’re going to review these topics:

        • Issues and risks
        • Financial impact of project problems
        • The timeline of where issues are discovered
        • Reviewing technical debt and agile projects
        • Creating a safe environment for the project team
        • Success modes and failure modes
        • Creating success strategies

        Detecting Problems and Defects
        01:59
        Understanding Lead Time and Cycle Time
        06:47
        In this assignment you’ll explore a case study and determine cycle time and lead time.
        Assignment: Case Study - Cycle Time and Lead Time
        4 questions
        Completing Variance Analysis
        02:35
        Identifying Trends in a Project
        01:58
        Setting Control Limits
        04:03

        Managing Threats and Issues is a task within this PMI-ACP examination domain. In PMP land, risks can be positive or negative. In agile projects, however, we only look at risk as being negative. It’s a threat to the project success.

        In this lecture we’re going to focus on three primary concepts:

        Risk is considered anti value

        Goal is to attack high-risk items early in the project

        Items with the greatest value in greatest risk move to the top of the backlog

        Know these themes for your PMI-ACP examination.

        Creating a Risk-Adjusted Backlog
        04:34
        Determining Risk Severity
        03:38
        Creating Risk Burndown Charts
        01:53

        For your PMI-ACP exam you'll need to be able to identify problems in order to solve problems.

        What's the Problem?
        14:45

        When there’s a problem the project team will look to you, the servant leader, to help resolve the problem. It’s part of the mantra of the servant leader, to remove impediments from blocking the project team. Problem solving is also part of continuous improvement.

        In this lecture you’ll want to look for these four concepts:

        • Problem solving games to fix the problem before it happens 
        • Consider daily standup 
        • Iteration reviews and retrospectives 
        • Sprint planning sessions

        Solving Problems in Agile Projects
        03:30

        Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

        PMI-ACP Coach
        01:56
        Problem Detection and Resolution Learning Game
        00:04

        Great job finishing up this section on finding and resolving problems. Problems and issues are going to happen in every project; some problems you can live with and they’ll work out, other problems you have to attack and find a solution. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

        This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

        Section Summary
        02:29

        This is a quiz on Problem Detection and Resolution.

        Problem Detection and Resolution Quiz
        10 questions
        + Continuous Improvement
        17 lectures 38:02

        Continuous improvement is a goal of any project manager in an agile environment. Continuous improvement means that you and the project team look for opportunities to improve the processes, the product, and the people within the project.

        In this section we’re going to discuss the process of agile project management that you should look for improvements within. We’ll also look at how the product owner and the project team work together to find improvement opportunities in the product the project is creating. We’ll also look at how the project team and the agile project manager can seek out opportunities to improve the people involved in the project.

        Overview of Domain VII Review: Continuous Improvement
        02:55

        The Continuous Improvement Exam Domain is worth just nine percent of the PMI-ACP examination. There are 11 questions on improving people, product, and process within your agile project management.

        The tasks you’ll be tested on are:

        • Periodically review and tailor the process 
        • Improve team processes through retrospectives 
        • Seek product feedback via frequent demonstrations 
        • Create an environment for continued learning 
        • Used values dream analysis to improve processes 
        • Spread improvements to other groups in the organization

        Leading Continuous Improvement as a Process
        02:53

        Continuous Process Improvement is an approach to tweak and tailor the processes within your agile project management to help the project, the product owner, the project team, and the customers of the project be better served.

        In this lecture I’ll discuss tailoring agile processes. Be on the lookout in the lecture and in your PMI-ACP examination for these themes on process improvement:

        • Adapting agile for your environment 
        • There is some risk with tailoring 
        • Better to create processes for each project as needed
        • Consider risk and reward
        Tailoring Processes
        02:18
        Completing Systems Thinking
        01:51
        Participating in Process Analysis
        02:22
        Creating Value Stream Maps
        02:22
        Hosting a Project Pre-Mortem
        01:39

        Continuous Product Improvement is a key element of agile project management. Throughout the project the project manager, the project team, and the product owner will communicate about the product, the project priorities, and how to be realize value.

        The PDCA cycle of Plan-Do-Check-Act is seen over and over in agile project management and is a topic we’ll discuss in this lecture. We’ll also take a look at product feedback and iteration reviews and planning. Let’s hop into this topic and talk more about product improvement for your PMI-ACP examination.

        Leading Product Review Sessions
        01:31
        Examining a Product Feedback Loop
        01:36
        Understanding Approved Iterations
        02:55
        Leading a Retrospective
        08:00
        In this assignment you’ll prepare for a retrospective. Retrospectives are an opportunity for the team to review what’s worked well, or hasn’t worked well, in the project.
        Assignment: Preparing for a Retrospective
        4 questions

        In this lecture we’ll discuss the improvement of the people on your project team. Throughout the agile project you will have opportunities to lead and coach the project. This will give you insight to what motivates the project team, what demotivates the team, and you’ll see characteristics of the project team members that may be holding themselves and the project back.

        Key thoughts for this exam objective are:

        What is going well?

        What areas could use improvement?

        What should we be doing differently?

        In this lecture we’ll also discuss some methods you can use to gauge how the team feels about issues, productivity, and the overall project performance.

        Completing Team Assessments
        01:46

        Continuous improvement is a goal of any project manager in an agile environment. Continuous improvement means that you and the project team look for opportunities to improve the processes, the product, and the people within the project.

        Section Summary
        01:25
        Continuous Improvement Learning Game
        00:04

        This is a quiz on Continuous Improvement in agile projects.

        Continuous Improvement Quiz
        10 questions

        Throughout the course I offer these quick coaching sessions about your effort to pass the PMI-ACP. These motivational lectures are a quick reminder of what it takes to earn the PMI-ACP and how you can work effectively to study to pass the test. I use the acronym PMA – Positive Mental Attitude – throughout this course. Keep your PMA! You can do this!

        Course Wrap and the PMI-ACP Coach
        01:38

        This final exam will test you on all areas of the PMI-ACP exam domains.

        PMI-ACP Final Exam
        115 questions

        Now that you’ve completed the PMI-ACP Exam Pre course you’re probably ready to complete the PMI-ACP examination application. In this video I’ll walk through the process of how to complete the application with your experience and education qualifications.

        In this lecture I’ll also discuss your certificate of completion. You’ll only need this certificate if your application is selected for a random audit. If you’re a PMP or another PMI certification holder you can claim this course for 21 PDUs. In this lecture I’ll also provide that information and how you can claim your PDUs.

        Here's the link to complete: https://pdf.ac/3GuWBr

        How to Claim PDUs and the Certificate of Completion
        02:18
        Link to Certificate
        00:29