Mr. K's Grammar World Presents: Chunky Language

Learn to see language differently
Rating: 4.3 out of 5 (11 ratings)
2,563 students
English
Students will learn how to identify groups of words, or chunks, that contain one unit of meaning.
Students will learn how to divide units of meaning in reading texts to improve reading comprehension.

Requirements

  • Students should have a low-intermediate level of English.

Description

In this course, you will learn about the basic building blocks of English.  First, you will learn a technique for counting syllables in words.  Then, you will learn a technique for dividing sentences up into groups of meaningful words, called chunks.  You will also have videos take you through some "chunking" exercises and many more exercises for your own practice.

Who this course is for:

  • Anyone who wants to improve their English grammar and reading skills.

Course content

1 section • 10 lectures • 1h 44m total length
  • Introduction
    06:34
  • Part 2: Parts of Language
    20:46
  • Part 3: Counting Syllables
    04:56
  • Part 4: How to Chunk a Sentence
    20:44
  • Part 5: Chunking Exercise - What was the Battle of Gettysburg
    09:32
  • Part 6a: Exercise 2 (1 ~ 5)
    06:28
  • Part 6b: Exercise 2 (6 ~ 10)
    06:36
  • Part 6c: Exercise 2 (11 ~ 15)
    05:45
  • Part 6d: Exercise 2 (16 ~ 20)
    05:54
  • Part 7: Split Chunks
    17:41

Instructor

English as a Second Language Instructor
Luther Killebrew
  • 4.1 Instructor Rating
  • 39 Reviews
  • 3,989 Students
  • 2 Courses

I have been teaching English as a Second Language for almost 30 years.  I hold a Master's Degree in TESL and have taught in Japan, the United States and the Middle East.  My areas of expertise include grammar, writing, editing, testing, material writing and curriculum design.  I have taught at the junior high school, high school and university levels, including holding a tenured Assistant Professor position at a Japanese university.  I have presented at international conferences, including the TESOL Conference and published in several journals, including the TESOL Journal.

I began designing my own classroom materials in the 90s because I was dissatisfied with the off-the-shelf materials provided to me by my schools.  Twenty five years later, I have an extensive library of unpublished material but lacked a forum for publishing that suited my style and material.

I also have an extensive background in Instructional Technology application in the classroom.  I have used many different tools including SMARTBoards, Moodle, EDLine, personal websites and social media.

I've been there, done that, and now I'm ready to broaden my teaching beyond a brick-and-mortar classroom.