Mastering Adobe Acrobat Pro DC Made Easy Training Tutorial
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Mastering Adobe Acrobat Pro DC Made Easy Training Tutorial

Create, Edit, Protect, and Share PDFs like a Pro
Bestseller
4.4 (65 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
357 students enrolled
Created by TeachUcomp, Inc.
Last updated 3/2018
English
English [Auto-generated]
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This course includes
  • 8 hours on-demand video
  • 2 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • Getting Acquainted with Acrobat
  • Opening and Viewing PDFs
  • Creating PDFs
  • Custom PDF Creation Settings
  • Basic PDF Editing
  • Advanced PDF Settings
  • Bookmarks
  • Adding Multimedia Content and Interactivity
  • Combining and Rearranging PDFs
  • Exporting and Converting Content
  • Collaborating
  • Creating and Working With Portfolios
  • Getting Started With Forms
  • Professional Print Production
  • Scanning and Optical Character Recognition
  • Automating Routine Tasks
  • Document Protection and Security
  • Adobe Reader and Document Cloud
  • Adobe Acrobat Help
Requirements
  • Adobe Acrobat software installed to practice
  • Basic Windows skills
Description

Learn Adobe Acrobat DC with this comprehensive course from TeachUcomp, Inc. Mastering Acrobat Made Easy features 163 video lessons with over 8 hours of introductory through advanced instruction. Watch, listen and learn as your expert instructor guides you through each lesson step-by-step. During this media-rich learning experience, you will see each function performed just as if your instructor were there with you. Reinforce your learning with the text of our two printable classroom instruction manuals (Introductory and Advanced), additional images and practice exercises. You will learn all about creating, editing, sharing and publishing Adobe PDFs and much more.

Whether you are completely new to Acrobat or upgrading from an older version, this course will empower you with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a proficient user. We have incorporated years of classroom training experience and teaching techniques to develop an easy-to-use course that you can customize to meet your personal learning needs. Simply launch the easy-to-use interface, click to start a video lesson or open one of the manuals and you are on your way to mastering Acrobat.

Who this course is for:
  • New users of Acrobat looking to learn the application from the ground up
  • Experienced users wanting to know advanced features like sharing, collaborating and security
  • Business Software Users
Course content
Expand all 165 lectures 07:59:56
+ Course Introduction
1 lecture 00:56

This lecture provides a brief summary of the topics covered throughout the course and offers suggestions for further reading and learning materials.

Preview 00:56
+ Getting Acquainted with Acrobat
16 lectures 40:17

Adobe Acrobat is a powerful program that creates and edits PDF documents. PDF stands for “portable document format.” Because PDF documents can be viewed by anyone who has installed the free Adobe Reader application, it is not necessary for a user to have the same application which created the PDF document to see the contents of the PDF document. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Preview 04:07

If you are new to Adobe Acrobat, you should begin by familiarizing yourself with Acrobat’s working environment. Start by learning the names and locations of the various tools that you will need to create and edit PDFs. Acrobat Pro DC has three different views: The Home view, the Tools view, and the Document view. The Home view is the initial view that appears when you first launch Acrobat Pro DC and do not have a document open. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Preview 02:47

After you initially open Acrobat or after clicking the “Home” button in the Tabbed Documents Bar, the “Home” view appears onscreen under the Tabbed Documents Bar. The “Home” view workspace is divided into two sections. On the left side of the screen is the Home Panel. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Preview 00:43

This is Acrobat Pro DC’s “Tools” view. The “Tools” view is very different from the “Home” view. In the “Tools” view, under the Tabbed Documents Bar, is a “Search for tools” feature. You can find all of Acrobat’s tools by typing search terms into the text field next to the magnifying glass. Below the “Search for tools” feature, the Tools screen displays all of Acrobat’s tools in one place. You can access any feature in Acrobat Pro DC from this screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Preview 01:11

If you double-click a PDF file to open the PDF in Acrobat, the “Document” view will automatically be displayed. If you launch the Acrobat software without opening a PDF file, the “Home” view will be displayed. To access the Document view from the Home view, simply double-click on any recently-opened PDF document listed in the Home view. The PDF is displayed in the Document view window, and a tab with the PDF file name appears in the Tabbed Documents Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Preview 02:30

Acrobat’s Menu Bar appears the same regardless of which view is displayed. The Menu Bar contains five drop-down menus: The “File” menu; the “Edit” menu, the “View” menu, the “Window” menu, and the “Help” menu. Clicking on any menu displays its drop-down command options. As you explore the Menu Bar, notice that some drop-down menu options are “greyed-out,” and cannot be selected. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Menu Bar
03:19

Unlike previous versions of Acrobat, toolbars only appear within the “Document” view. All the toolbars that are NOT opened by using either the “Tools” pane or “Tools” view appear within a single toolbar underneath the Tabbed Documents Bar, by default. Toolbars added to the “Document” view from the “Tools” pane or “Tools” view instead appear as yet another toolbar beneath the main toolbar in “Document” view. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Toolbars in Acrobat
03:56

The left end of the toolbar that appears under the Tabbed Documents Bar in the “Documents” view contains the “Common Tools” toolbar. The Common Tools toolbar is a collection of commonly-used buttons, grouped by different button set categories. This lesson examines the default toolbar buttons that appear within this toolbar at the left end of the main toolbar in the “Document” view. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Common Tools Toolbar
02:13

You can easily add and remove buttons from the Common Tools toolbar. This is the toolbar shown at the left end of the main toolbar under the Tabbed Documents Bar in the “Documents” view. The Common Tools toolbar is a collection of commonly-used buttons, grouped by different button set categories. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Customizing the Common Tools Toolbar
02:34

If it is shown within the main toolbar in the “Document” view, you can also easily add and remove buttons from the Quick Tools toolbar. You can add buttons to this toolbar for the features and functions you want to always have available. If enabled, the “Quick Tools” toolbar appears towards the right end of the main toolbar under the Tabbed Documents Bar in the “Documents” view. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Customizing the Quick Tools Toolbar
02:40

If shown in the main toolbar when using the “Document” view of a PDF, the “Page Controls” toolbar appears to the right of the “Common Tools” toolbar and to the left of the “Quick Tools” toolbar, if shown. This toolbar contains buttons that let you control the navigation and appearance of PDF pages within the view. You cannot customize the buttons within this toolbar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Page Controls Toolbar
02:12

You can reset all the customizable toolbars in Acrobat DC back to their default states, if needed. To reset all toolbars back to their default states, right-click the blank or “empty” area within the main toolbar or select “View| Show/Hide| Toolbar Items” from the Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Resetting All Customizable Toolbars
00:33

You can show and hide all the toolbars within Acrobat DC, if desired. You can also show and hide the Menu Bar, if needed. To show or hide all the toolbars, select “View| Show/Hide| Toolbar Items” from the Menu Bar to show a side menu or right-click in the blank or “empty” area of the main toolbar to open a pop-up menu. Then select either the “Hide Toolbars” or “Show Toolbars” command from the menu that appears, as needed. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Showing and Hiding All Toolbars and the Menu Bar
01:20

The Navigation Pane, which appears as a collapsed pane at the left side of the main document window, displays three buttons by default. When clicked, each button opens a different panel within the Navigation Pane. The three buttons shown by default within the Navigation Pane are “Page Thumbnails,” “Bookmarks,” and “Attachments.” In this lecture, you will learn about the functions available within these panels. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Navigation Pane
03:07

Acrobat’s “Tools” view shows all the software’s tools on one screen. You can use the scroll bar to the right of the screen to access all the tool categories. Each tool is represented by a labeled button above a drop-down menu. You can access a tool by either clicking its button or by selecting the “Open” command from its drop-down menu. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Tools Center
04:22

You can customize the Tools Pane in Acrobat to suit your needs. The Tools Center displays all of Acrobat’s features in one place. However, the Tools Pane can be adjusted to display only shortcuts to the tools you want. Customizing the Tools Pane does not change Acrobat’s ability to perform tasks; it merely helps to improve workflow by putting the features you want “at your fingertips.” Learn this and more during this lecture.

Customizing the Tools Pane
02:43
+ Opening and Viewing PDFs
10 lectures 31:31

You can open a PDF document in Acrobat Pro using several methods. The first method is to launch the Acrobat software by opening a PDF. To do this, locate the PDF file you want to open on your computer and then double-click the file using the mouse. Acrobat launches and displays the PDF’s Document view. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Opening PDFs
01:39

Acrobat makes it simple to select and copy both text and graphics, which you can then paste into other software applications or use to create other PDF files. When you first open a PDF, notice that the Selection tool is Acrobat’s default tool and that it is already selected and active. The Selection tool can be found just to the left of the Hand tool in the Document view toolbar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Selecting and Copying Text and Graphics
01:26

For this lecture, make sure to expand the Page Thumbnails panel on the left side of Acrobat’s Document view so that it is visible. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Rotating Pages
04:28

Acrobat lets you view an open PDF document in a number of ways. It’s important to note that, like Acrobat’s various zoom tools, these features do not edit the content of the open PDF in any way, but simply change the appearance of the PDF on the computer’s screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Changing the Viewing Options
02:50

Acrobat offers a variety of features for changing the magnification of a page view. It’s important to remember that these zoom tools do not edit PDF documents in any way. They simply change the magnification at which the document’s pages are displayed on your computer screen. Several of these zoom tools can be found in the Page Controls toolbar, but you must be in Document view to access this toolbar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Using the Zoom Tools
06:36

Acrobat is highly customizable, and Adobe lets you adjust your preferences for many different program settings. To launch Acrobat’s Preferences dialog box, select “Edit| Preferences” from the Menu Bar. At the left side of the window, you will see a long list of categories for which the preferences may be adjusted. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Reviewing Preferences
03:26

Acrobat’s “Find” feature lets you locate a word or phrase in a PDF document quickly, without having to read through all the text in the document. To use this feature, start by choosing “Edit| Find” from the Menu Bar. The Find toolbar appears in the upper-right corner of the application window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Finding Words and Phrases
02:34

Acrobat’s “Search” feature goes a step beyond what its “Find” feature can accomplish. Using the “Find” feature, users can locate a specific word or phrase in an active PDF document. By using the “Search” feature, however, you can expand your search to include all of the documents in a folder. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Searching a PDF and Using the Search Pane
02:36

Acrobat makes it easy to share PDF documents with others by attaching them to an email. To attach a PDF to an email message, select “File| Send File| Attach to email…” from Menu Bar to launch the “Send Email” dialog box, which prompts you to choose between using an email application on your computer or a web-based email application. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Sharing PDFs by Email
01:39

You can use Adobe “Send & Track” to share PDF documents with others. When you use Send & Track to share a PDF with others, Acrobat makes it easy to see who has viewed and downloaded the file. You can find the “Send & Track” feature in the Tools Center or you can select “File| Send File| Send & Track…” from the Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Sharing PDFs with Adobe Send and Track
04:17
+ Creating PDFs
14 lectures 46:57

Acrobat can be used to create new PDF files in a variety of ways. You can access Acrobat’s PDF creation features using three different methods. First, you can click the “Create PDF” tool in the Tools Center. Second, you can click the “Create PDF” shortcut found in the Tools Pane. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating New PDFs
02:42

To create a PDF from a file on your computer, select the “Create PDF” tool from the Tools Center. Acrobat displays the “Create a PDF from any format” screen. By default, the “Single File” PDF creation option is selected. Click “Select a File.” Acrobat launches the “Open” dialog box, and you can navigate to find the file you want to convert to PDF. When you find the file, click it to select it, and then click the “Open” button within the dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs from a File
02:47

Acrobat allows you to create a PDF from multiple files. For example, you can incorporate a text document and an image document into one PDF file using Acrobat. To create a PDF from multiple files, first click the “Create PDF” button in the Tools Center. Next, click the “Multiple Files” option from the left side of the “Create a PDF from any format” screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs from Multiple Files
04:23

Acrobat allows you to convert multiple files into PDF documents at the same time. To do this, first click the “Create PDF” button in the Tools Center. Next, click the “Multiple Files” option from the left side of the “Create a PDF from any format” screen. The right side of the screen displays three options. Click the “Create Multiple PDF Files” radio button, and then click “Next.” Acrobat displays the “Create Multiple PDF Files” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating Multiple PDF Files at Once
04:47

Acrobat lets you create PDF files from paper documents using your computer’s scanner. On the Windows operating system, Acrobat supports both TWAIN scanner drivers and Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) drivers. On Mac OS, Acrobat supports both TWAIN and Image Capture (ICA). Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs from Scanned Documents
03:49

Acrobat installs a PDF print driver into your computer’s system when Adobe Acrobat is installed. This lets you create a PDF from within almost any program on your computer that uses a printer. To do this, open a program that can print its contents and then open the “Print” dialog box or pane in the associated program. Within the “Print” dialog box or pane, choose “Adobe PDF” from the list of available printers. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs Using the PDF Printer
02:31

Acrobat allows you to create PDF documents from web pages. When you create a PDF from a web page using Acrobat, several types of files are converted during the operation. Web pages are written using Hypertext Markup Language, and then saved as HTML files. Most HTML files are associated with other types of files, such as jpeg images, image maps, and cascading style sheets. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs from Web Pages Using a Browser
08:06

Acrobat allows you to create PDF files from web pages within the Acrobat interface. To create a PDF from a web page, choose the “Create PDF” button in the Tools Center. Next, click the “Web Page” option from the left side of the “Create a PDF from any format” screen. The right side of the screen changes to reflect your selection. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs from Web Pages Using Acrobat
03:27

Acrobat allows you to create PDF files from information copied to your computer’s Clipboard. To create a PDF in this way, you have to first copy information to the Clipboard. To do this, locate the information you want to copy. It can be a photo from the internet, text from within a Word document, or any other content that could be displayed on a PDF. In most software applications, you select text by clicking and dragging to highlight your selection. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs from the Clipboard
01:36

Acrobat makes it easy to convert Microsoft Office files into PDF files from within the Microsoft Office applications. As was shown in an earlier lesson, you don’t need to open Acrobat at all to make use of the PDF conversion feature, thanks to the printer driver that is installed during Acrobat’s installation. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs Using Microsoft Office
02:14

Before creating a PDF, you should set the properties that you want the PDF file to contain using the “Preferences” button within the “Create Adobe PDF” button group on the “Acrobat” tab in the Ribbon within Excel, PowerPoint, or Word 2016-2010. You will examine the preferences you can set for PDF conversion within Excel, PowerPoint, and Word in the next chapter. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs in Excel, PowerPoint, and Word
03:02

You can also create PDF documents from within Adobe applications. As shown in the lesson titled “Creating PDFs Using the PDF Printer,” you can use the “Print” function to convert documents to PDF. However, in Adobe software, you can also create a PDF by selecting “File| Save As” from the Menu Bar to open the “Save As” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs in Adobe Applications
01:28

You can easily convert email messages into PDFs using Microsoft Outlook 2016-2010. This can be helpful if you want to archive your email messages, or if you want to be able to access or search email content while offline. To convert a selected email message or multiple selected email messages into a new single PDF, open Outlook and select the message or messages to convert. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating PDFs in Outlook
02:53

Outlook can convert an entire Outlook folder of mail messages into one searchable portfolio PDF file. This can be helpful at the completion of a project to save email communications for archival purposes before deleting them. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Converting Folders to PDF in Outlook
03:12
+ Custom PDF Creation Settings
15 lectures 57:17

To set the PDF settings used to convert the current file in Excel, Word or PowerPoint 2016-2010, click the “Preferences” button in the “Create Adobe PDF” button group on the “Acrobat” tab in the Ribbon to open the “Acrobat PDFMaker” dialog box. This dialog box shares many tabs and settings between all three applications. In this lecture, you will learn about these shared conversion settings and also the application-specific settings available to each. Learn this and more during this lecture.

PDF Preferences in Excel, PowerPoint, and Word
07:14

As was noted in the last chapter, you can click a button or link within the “Print” dialog box or pane of an application that is often called “Printer Properties,” “Page Setup,” “Settings,” or something similar, depending on the application, to open a dialog box that lets you adjust printer settings for the “Adobe PDF” printer within the program. The “Adobe PDF Settings” tab that appears within this dialog box lets you adjust the conversion settings for your PDF. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adobe PDF Settings
05:39

As was noted in the previous lesson, you can click a button or link within the “Print” dialog box or pane of an application that is often called “Printer Properties,” “Page Setup,” “Settings,” or something similar, depending on the application, to open a dialog box that lets you adjust printer settings for the “Adobe PDF” printer within the program. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating and Modifying Preset Adobe PDF Settings
03:31

To modify the “General” settings within a custom preset of PDF settings, click the “General” category that appears underneath the expanded view of the preset settings within the “Adobe PDF Settings” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The General Category in Preset Adobe PDF Settings
03:18

To modify the “Images” settings within a custom preset of PDF settings, click the “Images” category that appears underneath the expanded view of the preset settings within the “Adobe PDF Settings” dialog box. The settings within the “Images” category determine the compression and resampling to apply to color, grayscale, and monochrome images within a PDF. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Images Category in Preset Adobe PDF Settings
03:26

To modify the “Fonts” settings within a custom preset of PDF settings, click the “Fonts” category that appears underneath the expanded view of the preset settings within the “Adobe PDF Settings” dialog box. The settings within the “Fonts” category determine which fonts should be embedded within a PDF. You can embed many different types of fonts and subsets of fonts. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Fonts Category in Preset Adobe PDF Settings
03:10

To modify the “Color” settings within a custom preset of PDF settings, click the “Color” category that appears underneath the expanded view of the preset settings within the “Adobe PDF Settings” dialog box. The settings within the “Color” category determine the color profile and color management settings to use to produce PDF documents when printing using this preset. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Color Category in Preset Adobe PDF Settings
04:06

To modify the “Advanced” settings within a custom preset of PDF settings, click the “Advanced” category that appears underneath the expanded view of the preset settings within the “Adobe PDF Settings” dialog box. The settings within the “Advanced” category determine the Document Structuring Conventions (DSC) comments, which contain information about the file, to keep within a PDF and also determine other settings that affect PDF conversion. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Advanced Category in Preset Adobe PDF Settings
03:24

To modify the “Standards” settings within a custom preset of PDF settings, click the “Standards” category that appears underneath the expanded view of the preset settings within the “Adobe PDF Settings” dialog box. The settings within the “Standards” category let you check PostScript document content to ensure it meets standard PDF/X1-a, PDF/X-3, or PDF/A-1b criteria before the PDF is created. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Standards Category in Preset Adobe PDF Settings
02:57

To create a PDF from a file opened in Excel, PowerPoint, or Word 2016-2010 and then use Outlook to attach the PDF file to an email that is automatically generated, click the “Create and Attach to Email” button in the “Create and Email” button group on the “Acrobat” tab in the Ribbon of Excel, PowerPoint, or Word 2016-2010. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Create PDF and Email in Excel, PowerPoint, and Word
01:06

Acrobat lets you produce the results of a mail merge as PDF files. You can also choose to automatically email these merge result PDF files to designated recipients if the data source of the mail merge contains the recipient’s email address within one of its data fields. If you do not have this information within a field in the associated data source of the mail merge document in Word, you can still produce the results as PDF files, regardless. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Mail Merge and Email in Word
02:38

To create a PDF from a file opened in Excel, PowerPoint, or Word 2016-2010 and then start a shared review of the file with other users, click the “Create and Send for Shared Commenting” button in the “Review and Comment” button group on the “Acrobat” tab in the Ribbon of Excel, PowerPoint, or Word 2016-2010. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Create and Review in Excel, PowerPoint, and Word
02:41

You can import comments made in a PDF copy of a Word document back into the original Word 2016-2010 document as Word comments for reviewing purposes. To do this, open the Word document into which you want to import the Acrobat comments. Then click the “Acrobat Comments” button in the “Review and Comment” button group on the “Acrobat” tab in the Ribbon in Word 2016-2010. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Importing Acrobat Comments in Word
04:39

You can add video or audio in .mov, .mp3, or .swf formats into Word and PowerPoint files using Adobe Acrobat and Flash. Note that you must have Adobe Flash Player installed and enabled in Internet Explorer for this to work. Also note that Flash is being deprecated and will no longer be used by 2020, so you may want to take advantage of other methods for including multimedia within PDFs in the future. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Embed Flash in PowerPoint and Word
03:22

To change the settings used by Outlook for PDF conversion and also set up automatic conversion and archiving of messages within Outlook 2016-2010, click the “Change Conversion Settings” button in the “Preferences” button group on the “Adobe PDF” tab in the Ribbon to open the “Acrobat PDFMaker” dialog box. This dialog box contains three tabs: “Settings,” “Security,” and “Automatic Archival.” Learn this and more during this lecture.

PDF Settings and Automatic Archival in Outlook
06:06
+ Basic PDF Editing
9 lectures 28:19

When creating a PDF using Acrobat, you can control the document’s initial view settings. This means that you can determine how the PDF will appear on the screen when first opened. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Initial View Settings for PDFs
02:07

In Full Screen mode, Acrobat hides all of the toolbars, menus and panes, so that a PDF document occupies all of the available viewing space on the monitor. Full Screen mode is useful for viewing informational or instructional PDFs. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Full Screen Mode
01:39

Acrobat makes it easy to edit many aspects of a PDF by providing an “Edit PDF” tool. The tool allows you to modify existing elements within a PDF, and also allows you to add new elements to a PDF. Learn this and more during this lecture.

The Edit PDF Tool
02:24

You can easily add text to a PDF using Acrobat. To do this, open a document in Acrobat, and then select the “Edit PDF” tool from the Tools Center or the Tools Panel. The “Edit PDF” screen is displayed. Next, click the “Add Text” button found in the Edit PDF toolbar. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding, Formatting, Resizing, Rotating and Moving Text
05:10

As long as the security settings of a document allow for it, you can easily make edits to a PDF with Acrobat. You can change both the content and appearance of text in a text box within a PDF page. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Editing Text
01:13

Acrobat lets you manage the flow of text in PDF documents that contain areas of separated text. For example, this can help within a PDF like a newsletter, which often spans several pages. In these types of PDFs, longer text articles are sometimes broken up over several pages. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Managing Text Flow with Articles
07:17

To add an image to a PDF document, first select “Edit PDF” from the Tools Center or the Tools panel. Next, click the “Add Image” button from the “Edit PDF” toolbar. This will launch the “Open” dialog box. Navigate to find the image you want to add to the PDF, select it, and then click the “Open” button within the dialog box. A thumbnail of the image will appear attached to the mouse cursor. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding and Editing Images
04:19

By default, Acrobat automatically applies Arabic numerals to pages in a PDF document, with the first page of the document as page 1. You can change the way that pages are numbered in a PDF. For example, you can use this to omit numbering from a title page and start page numbering from the second page in the PDF. To do this, open a multi-page PDF and make sure the Page Thumbnails panel is opened within the Navigation Pane. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Changing the Page Number Display
02:20

Acrobat lets you adjust the visible area of a PDF by cropping pages. This can be helpful in creating visual consistency if working with pages of various sizes in a single PDF. To crop a PDF page, first choose the “Edit PDF” tool from the Tools Center or the Tools panel. Next, click the “Crop Pages” button in the Edit PDF toolbar. The mouse pointer changes into a crosshair crop tool. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Cropping Pages and Documents
01:50
+ Advanced PDF Editing
6 lectures 23:45

You can easily add a watermark to your PDF document using Acrobat. Originally, watermarks were faint designs used only in paper manufacturing, but digital watermarks are helpful for displaying a document’s copyright information, author, or even a logo. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding and Removing Watermarks
05:37

You can add a background to a PDF document to create visual interest. To add a background to a PDF, choose the “Edit PDF” tool from the Tools Center or Tools panel. Next, click the “More” button found in the Edit PDF toolbar, and then choose the “Background” command from the drop-down menu. Select “Add…” from the sub-menu that appears. The “Add Background” dialog box opens. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding and Removing Page Backgrounds
05:44

To add headers and footers to PDF files, first choose the “Edit PDF” tool from the Tools Center or the Tools panel. Next, click the “Header & Footer” button found in the Edit PDF toolbar, and then choose the “Add…” command from the drop-down menu to open the “Add Header and Footer” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding Headers and Footers
04:07

You can attach other files to a PDF. These files can be of many file types, including other PDF files. To attach a file to a PDF, open a PDF document, and then select the “Edit PDF” tool from the Tools Center or the Tools panel. Next, click the “More” button found in the Edit PDF toolbar. Select “Attach File” from the drop-down menu. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Attaching Files to a PDF
02:15

You can easily add metadata, including keywords, to a PDF using Acrobat. Metadata supplies additional information about a PDF file. To add metadata to a PDF, open a PDF file in Acrobat and then select “File| Properties” from the Menu Bar to open the “Document Properties” dialog box. In the “Layout and Magnification” section of the dialog box, you will see a text box labeled, “Open to page.” Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding Metadata
01:13

In Acrobat, you can use the PDF Optimizer to control the file size and quality of a PDF. This is especially helpful if you are creating image-intensive PDFs. Sometimes you will want a smaller file size, for example, if you want to produce a PDF intended for mobile devices. At other times you will want the highest image quality possible, for example, if your PDF will be professionally printed. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Optimizing a PDF for File Size and Compatibility
04:49
+ Bookmarks
3 lectures 05:55

Bookmarks are links that help to navigate a PDF quickly. You can use bookmarks in PDF documents in a number of ways. The Bookmarks panel, found in the Navigation Pane, contains text links to different points in a PDF document. When you click a link in the Bookmarks panel, the main document window changes to reflect the part of the PDF to which the bookmark is linked. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Using Bookmarks in a PDF
02:36

You can modify and organize bookmarks within the Bookmarks panel in the Navigation Pane. You can also nest bookmarks to create bookmark groups. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Modifying and Organizing Bookmarks
01:43

You can create bookmarks in a PDF that are linked to actions. This can be helpful if you want to make it easy for a viewer to access an outside website, or search a PDF, or perform any number of different menu actions from within the Bookmarks panel. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Assigning Actions to Bookmarks
01:36
+ Adding Multimedia Content and Interactivity
5 lectures 24:11

Using Acrobat, you can easily add hyperlinks and other types of links to PDFs. This is helpful when you want to create a link to a webpage within a page in a PDF document. To create a link using Acrobat, begin by selecting the “Edit PDF” tool from the Tools Center or Tools panel. Next, click the “Link” button found in the Edit PDF toolbar. Select the “Add/Edit Web or Document Link” command from the drop-down menu. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating Links with the Link Tool
03:51

You can use Acrobat to create buttons within pages of PDF documents. Buttons are similar to links in that a person viewing a PDF can click them to launch an action. However, buttons have more complex features that can be adjusted, and buttons can be created “from scratch” in Acrobat, rather than being linked to existing PDF content. Buttons can be configured to launch a variety of different actions, for example submitting data, opening a file, or going to a different page. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Creating and Editing Buttons
07:34

You can add video, sound, and Flash SWF files to a PDF document using Acrobat. Acrobat supports MOV, MP3, SWF and other media file types encoded with the H.264 codec. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding Video, Sound, and SWF Files
06:03

You can add 3D content to PDF documents using Acrobat. Acrobat can view U3D and PRC 3D files, such as the kind created in Adobe Photoshop. To add a 3D object to a PDF, start by clicking the “Rich Media” button from the Tools Center. The Rich Media screen is displayed. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding 3D Content to PDFs
04:33

Using Acrobat, you can add dynamic page transitions that will be displayed each time a page advances in a PDF when viewed in “Full Screen Mode.” This can be useful when creating PDFs for audiovisual presentations. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Adding Page Transitions
02:10
+ Combining and Rearranging PDFs
5 lectures 15:19

Using Acrobat, you can easily manipulate entire pages of a PDF. This can be helpful if you want to extract pages from a document or if you want to replace one page with another in a PDF. For example, extracting pages from a PDF is useful if you want to email somebody just one or two pages from a PDF. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Extracting and Replacing Pages
03:25

Using Acrobat, you can easily split a PDF document into multiple files. This can be helpful if you want to break up a very large PDF into several smaller documents. To split a PDF into multiple files, first open the PDF file you want to break up. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Splitting a PDF into Multiple Files
04:24

You can insert pages into a PDF from files and other sources using Acrobat. You can insert pages from another PDF file, from content copied to the Clipboard, or you can even insert a blank page into a PDF. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Inserting Pages from Files and Other Sources
02:09

You can manipulate pages in a PDF in a variety of ways using Acrobat. To move a page to another spot within a PDF file, first display the Page Thumbnails panel in the Navigation Pane and locate the thumbnail image of the page to move. Then click and drag the thumbnail image to a new location within the Page Thumbnails panel in the Navigation Pane. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Moving and Copying Pages
00:58

To combine several PDF documents together to create one larger PDF, select the “Combine Files” tool from the “Create & Edit” section of the Tools Center. The “Combine Files” view is displayed. Notice that the main document window provides an “Add Files” button, as well as basic instructions for its use. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Combining PDFs
04:23