Learn to fly the De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito. 633 Squadron.
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Learn to fly the De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito. 633 Squadron.

Compare it to other similar aircraft of the same era. Amazing planes of World War II
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Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
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Last updated 6/2020
English
Current price: $23.99 Original price: $34.99 Discount: 31% off
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This course includes
  • 7 hours on-demand video
  • Full lifetime access
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  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • Learn how to fly and handle the De Havilland Mosquito DH98
Requirements
  • Best in VR with controllers and Gaming PC or just watch. Amazing planes of World War II
Description

You will need twin engine controllers. 2 throttles, 2 mixture controls and 2 propeller pitch controls. Superb aircraft to fly in VR.

The object of this course is to feel what it was like to fly such a legend of an aircraft. We will be going through all the sort of things the Mosquito crews would have done and get ourselves familiar with handling and take off/landings at different weights. Then we will do low level navigation cross country to other airports and practice flying and landing on one engine.

The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito is a British twin-engined, shoulder-winged multirole combat aircraft, introduced during the Second World War. Unusual in that its frame is constructed mostly of wood, it was nicknamed the "Wooden Wonder", or "Mossie". Lord Beaverbrook, Minister of Aircraft Production, nicknamed it "Freeman's Folly", alluding to Air Chief Marshal Sir Wilfrid Freeman, who defended Geoffrey de Havilland and his design concept against orders to scrap the project. In 1941, it was one of the fastest operational aircraft in the world.

Originally conceived as an unarmed fast bomber, the Mosquito's use evolved during the war into many roles, including low- to medium-altitude daytime tactical bomber, high-altitude night bomber, pathfinder, day or night fighter, fighter-bomber, intruder, maritime strike, and photo-reconnaissance aircraft. It was also used by the British Overseas Airways Corporation as a fast transport to carry small, high-value cargo to and from neutral countries through enemy-controlled airspace. The crew of two, pilot and navigator, sat side by side. A single passenger could ride in the aircraft's bomb bay when necessary.

The Mosquito FBVI was often flown in special raids, such as Operation Jericho – an attack on Amiens Prison in early 1944, and precision attacks against military intelligence, security, and police facilities (such as Gestapo headquarters). On 30 January 1943, the 10th anniversary of the Nazis' seizure of power, a morning Mosquito attack knocked out the main Berlin broadcasting station while Hermann Göring was speaking, putting his speech off the air.

The Mosquito flew with the Royal Air Force (RAF) and other air forces in the European, Mediterranean and Italian theatres. The Mosquito was also operated by the RAF in the Southeast Asian theatre and by the Royal Australian Air Force based in the Halmaheras and Borneo during the Pacific War. During the 1950s, the RAF replaced the Mosquito with the jet-powered English Electric Canberra.

Who this course is for:
  • Beginner Amazing planes of World War II
Course content
Expand 27 lectures 06:59:58
+ Introduction
27 lectures 06:59:58

A quick flight to Blackpool from Liverpool and a few touch and goes at Woodvale near Southport on the way.

Preview 20:36

In my experience loads of real pilots have flight sims.

Preview 11:22

You need to get used to take off and landing first, which means going around and around, Take off clean with no flaps and control the amount of power you are pushing in to avoid swinging off the runway. Once in the air raise the gear and reduce the RPM on the props to 2200. Downwind close the throttles and props to fine pitch, lower the gear at 150 knots and the flaps at 120 to 140, Try to nail the airspeed now at 120 knots all the way in. Just use 1 stage of flaps. Keep going around and around until you nail it.

Preview 16:50

This is a low level navigation test. Do not fly over 1000ft or you fail. Navigate up the loch to the west coast of Scotland then land at Stornaway. In this test I took a wrong turn and went up the wrong valley. Study the map and do not take any wrong turns.

Preview 20:04
Touch and go's at Stornoway.
15:40

Low level flying around part of Lewis and Harris.

Low flying Stornoway.
16:10
Low Level Nav ex to Stornoway second time.
22:24
Stornoway to Benbecula.
16:46

An engine can pack up during a flight. It is important to cut the fuel off and feather the prop lever all the way back to reduce the drag it will otherwise create, Then be able to land the aircraft safely.

Landing on just the right engine.
04:52

An engine can pack up during a flight. It is important to cut the fuel off and feather the prop lever all the way back to reduce the drag it will otherwise create, Then be able to land the aircraft safely.

Landing on one just the left engine.
07:28
Landing on no engines. Gliding in.
04:28

Real time and weather.

Benbecula to Tiree
19:00

Free flying low level nav.

Tiree to Oban.
17:54
Oban to Inverness low level up Loch Ness.
20:47
Relocate the aircraft to Aberdeen Scotland.
23:51
Touch and goes tightening up that circuit.
12:00

633 Squadron is a 1964 British war film directed by Walter Grauman and starring Cliff Robertson, George Chakiris, and Maria Perschy. The plot, which involves the exploits of a fictional World War II British fighter-bomber squadron, was based on a novel of the same name by former Royal Air Force officer Frederick E. Smith, published in 1956, which itself drew on several real RAF operations. The film was produced by Cecil F. Ford for the second film of Mirisch Productions UK subsidiary Mirisch Films for United Artists. 633 Squadron was the first aviation film to be shot in colour and Panavision widescreen

Low flying in the Norway Fjords
05:10

Photo-reconnaissance

A 1943 RAF photo-reconnaissance picture of Test Stand VII at the Peenemünde Army Research Centre, taken by a Mosquito. V2 rockets, lying horizontally on transport trolleys, are labelled "B" and "C".

Loading photoflash bombs onto a PR Mk XVI of No. 140 Squadron RAF at B58/Melsbroek, Belgium, circa 1944–1945

A total of 10 Mosquito PR Mk Is were built, four of them "long range" versions equipped with a 151 imperial gallons (690 L) overload fuel tank in the fuselage. The contract called for 10 of the PR Mk I airframes to be converted to B Mk IV Series 1s.[133] All of the PR Mk Is, and the B Mk IV Series 1s, had the original short engine nacelles and short span (19 ft 5.5 in) tailplanes. Their engine cowlings incorporated the original pattern of integrated exhaust manifolds, which, after relatively brief flight time, had a troublesome habit of burning and blistering the cowling panels.[134] The first operational sortie by a Mosquito was made by a PR Mk I, W4055, on 17 September 1941; during this sortie the unarmed Mosquito PR.I evaded three Messerschmitt Bf 109s at 23,000 feet (7,000 m).[135] Powered by two Merlin 21s, the PR Mk I had a maximum speed of 382 miles per hour (615 km/h), a cruise speed of 255 miles per hour (410 km/h), a ceiling of 35,000 feet (11,000 m), a range of 2,180 nautical miles (4,040 km), and a climb rate of 2,850 feet (870 m) per minute.

Over 30 Mosquito B Mk IV bombers were converted into the PR Mk IV photo-reconnaissance aircraft. The first operational flight by a PR Mk IV was made by DK284 in April 1942.

PR Mosquito in Norway low level.
22:21

I did find the take off roll 1 stage of flaps and keeping the stick right back helped me a lot on take off.

Cracking the take off, low level circuits.
09:12
Gibraltar to Tangiers VFR.
13:40
Tangiers back to Gibraltar.
17:33
Blackpool to Liverpool.
11:17

Circuit training is a must. Never get complacent. Do 3 laps whenever you can in real time and weather.

Touch and go practice in Liverpool.
16:55

Shoreham airport in Sussex (Harry and Meghan) How to mess up landing with full flaps.

FULL FLAPS.
23:49
RAF Wyton
14:20

If you are happy now flying the DH 98 here is a small single engine jet that you can download for free and fly straight away. It is the De Havilland Vampire and it will do 400 knots.

De Havilland Vampire Jet. 400knots.
15:11