Learn 100 British English Idioms for English Conversation
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Learn 100 British English Idioms for English Conversation

Upgrade your English and sound like a native! and Learn English
0.0 (0 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
6 students enrolled
Created by Oliver M.
Last updated 11/2019
English
English [Auto-generated]
Current price: $12.99 Original price: $19.99 Discount: 35% off
17 hours left at this price!
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This course includes
  • 30 mins on-demand video
  • 1 article
  • 2 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • 100 British English idioms and how to use them correctly
  • Sound more like a native when you speak English
  • Understand English: films, TV , and writing better
  • How to have better English conversations
Requirements
  • Good knowledge of English
  • An interest to improve English
Description

Idioms are an exceptional way to improve your English and they can help you to both sound like a native speaker but also understand them better, natives use idioms all the time when they just talk normally and often don’t even realise it, this is why without them you are likely to find understanding native’s speech difficult, even when you can understand all the words!


In this course I will tell you 100 common idioms that are used in everyday speech by native British English speakers, I will then explain what the idiom means and then also how you can use it, or give an example of how I can be used. The course has been designed to last 1 month, the 100 idioms had been broken down into 20 sets of 5, this way over the period of a month you can learn one of the sets of 5 each day and complete the accompanying activity and also read about the origin, once you have seen all the idioms in the course its then time to go back and look again at the idioms that you learned in the month to make sure you have remembered them all, and then you will be able to use the practice assessment to check that you know them all.


Who this course is for:
  • People who want to upgrade their spoken English, to understand and speak like a native
Course content
Expand all 24 lectures 30:45
+ Learning and Practice
22 lectures 28:31

Origins of the idioms in this lecture:

  • A penny for your thoughts: Comes from a time when the British penny was worth a significant amount. The first recorded usage was in 1522 when Sir Thomas More's Four Last Things he wrote: “It often happeth, that the very face sheweth the mind walking a pilgrimage, in such wise that other folk sodainly say to them a peny for your thought.”

  • Actions speak louder than words: The first recorded use was in 1736 in a work called Melancholy State of Province. However Michel de Montaigne in an essay in the 1500s wrote: “Saying is a different thing from doing.”, so the idea behind t has been around for even longer.

  • An arm and a leg: The origin is not completely clear, some say it was from a time before cameras, when rich people would have portraits of themselves painted, and if they wanted arms and legs painting too they would have to pay extra and the phrase came about like this.  It  more likely from the USA after the Second World War, when soldiers lost their arms and legs and therefore paid a high price, and the earliest published use is likely in The Long Beach Independent  in December 1949. However the phrase, “give an arm” was used in  Sharpe's London Journal  in 1849, and the idiom  “an arm and a leg ” may be related to this.

  • Back to the drawing board: First used in New Yorker in 1941

  • The ball is in your court: Comes from tennis, because when the ball is in your court it's your turn to play. It has been used in tennis since the early 1900s, and is unclear as to when it was used as an idiom.

Preview 01:44

This quiz will test your knowledge of the first 20 idioms in the course to make sure that you know them all.

Idioms 0- 20 Quiz
20 questions
Idioms 21-25
01:37
Idioms 26-30
01:26
Idioms 31-35
01:15
Idioms 36-40
01:11

This quiz will test your knowledge of the second 20 idioms in the course to make sure that you know them all.

Idioms 21-40 Quiz
20 questions
Idioms 41-45
01:15
Idioms 46-50
01:19
Idioms 51-55
01:21
Idioms 56-60
01:13

Test your knowledge of the last 20 idioms.

Idioms 41-60 Quiz
20 questions
Idioms 61-65
01:27
Idioms 66-70
01:20
Idioms 71-75
01:09

Test of your knowledge of the last 20 idioms.

Idioms 61-80 Quiz
20 questions
Idioms 81-85
01:09
Idioms 86-90
01:02
Idioms 91-95
00:53

Check your knowledge of the final 20 idioms.

Idioms 81-100 Quiz
20 questions
Practice All 100 Idioms
00:50
Congratulations on Completing the Course
01:15