Lean Manufacturing, Lean Operations: Learn through questions
4.3 (10 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
15 students enrolled

Lean Manufacturing, Lean Operations: Learn through questions

Beginners: Learn faster by finding the key gaps in your knowledge through rounds of multiple choice questions
Hot & New
4.3 (10 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
15 students enrolled
Created by Laurence Gartside
Last updated 5/2020
English
Current price: $41.99 Original price: $59.99 Discount: 30% off
5 hours left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
This course includes
  • 6 Practice Tests
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile
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Requirements
  • Very basic knowledge of Lean is helpful but not essential
  • Perhaps you did a course a while ago, you know a few words and some ideas but want to sharpen up fast
  • A desire to learn very quickly the essentials of Lean and push yourself to really remember what you learn
Included in This Course
+ Practice Tests
6 Tests 199 questions

Lean is a big topic built on the combined knowledge and experience of generations of great industrialists and engineers such as Frederick Taylor, Henry Ford and then formulated into the Toyota Production System in the mid 20th century under the leadership of greats such as Taiichi Ohno and Eiji Toyoda.

With the phenomenal success of the mid 20th century Japanese car industry, the West took notice. Whilst the word "Lean" was first used only in 1988, it has been the dominant philosophy and methodology of operational improvement globally since.

A systems approach with a broad set of principles based on the flow of customer value creation and waste reduction, lean has since expanded to play major roles outside of manufacturing and into healthcare, retail, transport and the military.

Jump straight into Quiz 1

See what you know, what you can work out and what you never knew you didn't know, read the explanations and try again!

Fundamentals, History, Lean Philosophy
33 questions

Lean often carries the misconception that it is about reducing waste, overburden and unevenness (Muda, Muri  and Mura) but in truth it is about "value", growth and profit. This is much deeper than the unhelpful idea that a manager should walk around the factory floor and start pointing out obvious forms of waste.

Value is in the eyes of the customer, not the operations manager!

If strategic inventory provides order winning short lead times that the customer will pay for then that's great; just beware of all the orders it might be losing you through lack of flexibility lead times to react and meet new types of demand!

Value to the customer might be broken down into "order qualifiers" and "order winners". Qualifiers get you into consideration, but winners close the deal! Perhaps both car dealerships can sell a well priced, blue sports car (qualifier) but only one of them can get it delivered in less than 2 weeks (order winner).



Value and Waste
24 questions

Too often, companies "start Lean" with an isolated use of odd tools: A "5S" cleanup here, a local layout redesign there...  But Lean is a "systems approach" built on principles that apply the powerful tools in a coherent manor to improve the whole value chain.

Creating, organising for and maintaining "flow" of customer value is a much better systems approach around which the many powerful tools of Lean can be applied.

Lean uses tools such as "Value Steam Mapping" map the system of processes and identify value and non value adding activities; Kanban for inventory control or "Visual Management" for making performance and status visible to all. Getting familiar with Lean's great range of tools and what they are called lets you join the conversation and guide your business's efforts to be inline with the core principles of Lean.

The Quality section covers Lean's approach /tool and how they fit with other complementary methodologies such as Six Sigma.

Tools and Quality
32 questions

Flow refers to the organisation and execution of keeping material and information moving through value adding processes in a smooth, continuous manor.

Lean approaches this central aim from many directions throughout the whole supply chain: from managing suppliers to encourage smaller more regular orders, its own internal practices to minimise large batch and queue behaviour and keeping a close feel on actual customer demand.

It can be incredibly easy for "local optimisations / efficiencies" made in isolation to cause terrible overall performance especially in terms of lead time and total operating costs.

Maybe it is very "efficient" for the paint plant to do all the blue cars for the year together in January, but how will that effect customer delivery and total inventory levels!!

Never forget Scheduling - often an office based department a little distant from the action, their decisions and procedures are central to operational performance.

Flow and Scheduling
38 questions

OK!  So you're ready for the final tests!

This first "Final Test" will cover what you have learnt from the earlier Quizzes 1,2 and a bit of 3.

Make sure you have read the answer explanations from the earlier quizzes. Even if you got the right answer, the supporting detail there adds a depth of understanding. Lean is more than just remembering the TLAs!

As this test is a final confirmation of your cemented learning from having gone through the earlier quizzes, possibly a few times, hopefully you are now ready to perform and show off your new knowledge!

A few questions are repeats of the very important questions, others cover the same topics from another angle to check you really know what you're talking about!

Good Luck!

Final Test 1 - Fundamentals, History, Lean Philosophy, Value, Waste & Tools.
38 questions

This second "Final Test" will cover what you have learnt from the earlier Quizzes 3 &4.

Make sure you have read the answer explanations from the earlier quizzes. Even if you got the right answer, the supporting detail there adds a depth of understanding. Lean is more than just remembering the TLAs!

As this test is a final confirmation of your cemented learning from having gone through the earlier quizzes, possibly a few times, hopefully you are now ready to perform and show off your new knowledge!

A few questions are repeats of the very important questions, others cover the same topics from another angle to check you really know what you're talking about!

Good Luck!

Final Test 2 - Quality, Flow & Scheduling
34 questions
Description

Everyone has "heard" of Lean...   It's probably the most successful and widespread operations improvement methodology of all time.

But can "you" really stand up and talk knowledgeably about it; be a valuable team member of your company's most important initiative, be comfortable with the Lean principles and all the specialist language when you are asked to offer senior support to a Lean project?...

This course is for ambitious professionals working in operations: be that manufacturing, retail, healthcare, transport looking for a grounding in what Lean is (and isn't); the principles, philosophy, tools and language of Lean.

Assuming very little or no prior knowledge of Lean, the first 4 multiple choice quizzes simultaneously teach and test you Lean; enforcing key details you perhaps already knew and identifying knowledge gaps you didn't know you had.

Each question has a follow up explanation to get you up to speed quickly and with focus on where you need it.

Finally, put together all you have learnt with the 2 Final Exam multiple choice tests.


The course covers 8 topics:

1. Fundamentals

2. History

3. Philosophy and Principles

4. Value and Waste

5. Tools

6. Quality

7. Flow

8. Scheduling


Most people with no specific Lean training get 45% of answers right the first time around whilst the average score for someone who has done a 1-3 day lean course within the last 2 years gets about 85% on their first attempt.   Find what you got wrong, read the targeted explanations and go again!


Fast track your learning, save yourself hours of half watching videos and get straight into testing yourself, finding those knowledge gaps and filling them, taking your confidence in Lean from zero/basic to confident in 2 hours.


Who this course is for:
  • Operations (Planning, Production)
  • Employees Looking to further Their Careers
  • Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineers
  • Quality and Industrial Engineers
  • Manufacturing and Service Employees
  • Continuous Improvement Specialists/Managers
  • Management Consultants
  • Project Managers
  • Production Employees
  • SME Business Owners