Interfaith Dialogue for Peace-Making

Undertaking dialogue for mutual learning and peace-making.
Rating: 4.5 out of 5 (11 ratings)
1,358 students
Interfaith Dialogue for Peace-Making
Rating: 4.5 out of 5 (11 ratings)
1,358 students
Religion
Spirituality
Inter faith

Requirements

  • No
Description

The Interfaith Dialogue for Peace-Making Foundation Program is a two-week program that gives insight into

the interfaith dialogue for peace-making process. It trains participants in interfaith dialogue for mutual learning,

not for debate or uniformity, by explaining principles like mutual respect, follow one respect all, cooperation,

adjustment, agree to disagree, etc. It, further, trains in peace-making by explaining principles like religious

freedom, acceptance of diversity, love for all, reconciliation, peace for the sake of peace and positive status

quoism. Participants are thus able to effectively undertake dialogue for mutual learning and peace-making.

Who this course is for:
  • All Levels
Course content
14 sections • 24 lectures • 1h 2m total length
  • Interfaith Dialogue for Peace-Making Pre Test
    10 questions
  • Respecting all Religions (Video)
    01:42
  • Respecting all Religions (Theory)
    02:38
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Follow One and Respect All (Video)
    01:43
  • Follow One and Respect All (Theory)
    02:17
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Tolerance is the Price of Peace (Video)
    01:56
  • Tolerance is the Price of Peace (Theory)
    02:20
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Nature as a Role Model (Video)
    01:38
  • Nature as a Role Model (Theory)
    01:52
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Living in a Pluralistic Society (Video)
    01:42
  • Living in a Pluralistic Society (Theory)
    01:57
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Divergence of Views (Video)
    01:44
  • Divergence of Views (Theory)
    02:46
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Inter Faith Bridge-Building (Video)
    01:48
  • Inter Faith Bridge-Building (Theory)
    02:56
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • The Purpose of Interfaith Dialogue (Video)
    02:03
  • The Purpose of Interfaith Dialogue (Theory)
    03:41
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions
  • Differences in Inter-Religious Dialogue (Video)
    01:49
  • Differences in Inter-Religious Dialogue (Theory)
    03:10
  • Multiple Choice Questions
    4 questions
  • Theory Questions
    2 questions

Instructor
Centre for Peace and Spirituality
CPS International
  • 4.0 Instructor Rating
  • 171 Reviews
  • 7,160 Students
  • 6 Courses

CPS International, the Centre for Peace and Spirituality, as is apparent from its name, is an organization, which aims to promote and reinforce the culture of peace through mind-based spirituality. Non-profit-making and non-political in nature, it is engaged in promoting peace and spirituality through inter-faith efforts. The Centre was founded in January 2001 by Maulana Wahiduddin Khan, an Islamic scholar who has adopted peace, spirituality and inter-faith harmony as the mission of his life. According to him, peace and spirituality are both, in fact, two aspects of the one truth. Positive thinking at an individual level is called spirituality; when this positive thinking reaches a collective level in society, it culminates in peace. The question is how should the message of peace and spirituality be spread? There are two ways of addressing people: one is at collective level and the other is at individual level. While most speakers prefer to address people en masse, Maulana Wahiduddin Khan has – to the point of sacrifice – chosen to interact with people at individual level. According to him, addressing a crowd does not yield any long-term results, for, in very large groups, the individual’s mind is never properly addressed, and therefore individuals – the building blocks of society – are unlikely to change.