Holistic Approaches for Living with Anxiety
4.7 (8 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
32 students enrolled

Holistic Approaches for Living with Anxiety

Integrating the body, relationships, Ayurveda and herbal medicine to increase ease and wellbeing
4.7 (8 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
32 students enrolled
Created by Leslie Wilkin
Last updated 5/2020
English
English [Auto]
Current price: $23.99 Original price: $34.99 Discount: 31% off
5 hours left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
This course includes
  • 2 hours on-demand video
  • 13 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
Training 5 or more people?

Get your team access to 4,000+ top Udemy courses anytime, anywhere.

Try Udemy for Business
What you'll learn
  • Holistic models for understanding anxiety from a body-based, relationship, and Ayurvedic perspective
  • Practical skills and tools to use to manage anxiety
  • Movement practices, herbal remedies, and relationship skills
Requirements
  • No
Description

This course is intended to provide holistic models and practical tools for working with anxiety. Often medication and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) are the primary treatments people are offered when struggling with anxiety. While some people find these options very helpful, others may find them limited as resources. In this course, I will introduce several holistic and complementary models for understanding and living with anxiety.

The course is meant to serve as an introductory resource and will be broken into 3 sections:

  • Anxiety and the Body: this will help to better understand what happens physically during anxiety, and how to use movement and body awareness as resources to help regulate anxiety.


  • Anxiety and Relationships: this section explains how most anxiety is relationship-based, and how to interact with others in a way that reduces anxiety. This section focusses on our relationship patterns that may trigger anxiety.


  • Anxiety, Ayurveda & Herbal Allies: this section introduces an alternative model of understanding anxiety, drawing from the eastern science of Ayurveda. Simple herbs and recipes to nourish the body will also be offered as well as Ayurvedic lifestyle practices.

Drawing on my years of personal and professional training and experience as a clinical social worker, mental health therapist, and yoga teacher, this course is designed to empower learners to understand and manage anxiety in a way that honours mind, body, and spirit.

Who this course is for:
  • Anyone living with chronic or acute anxiety difficulties
  • Helping professional, therapists, yoga teachers, body workers and others who support individuals with anxiety
Course content
Expand all 16 lectures 02:09:11
+ Introduction
1 lecture 09:59

This course is intended to provide holistic models and practical tools for working with anxiety. Often medication and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) are the primary treatments people are offered when struggling with anxiety. While some people find these options very helpful, others may find them limited as resources. In this course, I will introduce several holistic and complementary models for understanding and living with anxiety.

The course is meant to serve as an introductory resource and will be broken into 3 sections:

- Anxiety and the Body : this will help to better understand what happens physically during anxiety, and how to use movement and body awareness as resources

- Anxiety and Relationships: this section explains how most anxiety is relationship-based, and how to interact with others in a way that reduces anxiety

-Anxiety, Ayurveda & Herbal Allies: this section introduces an alternative model of understanding anxiety, drawing from the eastern science of Ayurveda. Simple herbs and recipes to nourish the body will also be offered.


Drawing on my years of personal and professional training and experience as a clinical social worker, mental health therapist, and yoga teacher, this course is designed to empower learners to understand and manage anxiety in a way that honours mind, body, and spirit.

Preview 09:59
+ Section 2 - Anxiety and Your Body
5 lectures 40:32

In this section, students will learn the basics of the human stress response and how this shows up in the body. Since so much of our daily felt experiences starts from the "bottom up" (nervous systems and sensory information influences our thoughts), rather then "top down" (thoughts change our felt emotional and body experience), it's important to understand what happens in our bodies during anxiety.

In response to this distressing and uncomfortable anxiety experience, we may find we are living in states of hypervigilance, avoidance, and exhaustion. In order to shift what we are experiencing, we need to move our bodies differently to send our brains new information.

After the lecture, you will have access to several short videos to practice different tools for working with anxiety.

The first practice video involves a breathing practice. Breathing is one of the few automatic stress responses we can actually control, so while often "breathing" is overused, when done effectively it can be a powerful tool. In my experience, generally when people find breathing practices unhelpful it is because they are being taught in a way that feels uncomfortable or invalidating.

The second series of practices come from Somatic therapy, and involve self-holding, shaking and tapping as ways to soothe and discharge stress from the nervous system.

Finally, drawing from trauma-sensitive yoga, a series of simple movement choices are offered that can shift the body our of states of powerlessness and overwhelm and into a greater sense of groundedness.

Anxiety and Your Body
08:53

Building on the previous lecture, this lecture delves deeper into how understanding how anxiety experiences in the body show up in our behaviour. Generally when people feel anxious, they will fall into a hypervigilant, avoidant or immobilized state of being. While all are a response to threat and fear based emotions, they look a little different.

This lecture can help you to notice your frequent anxiety body states, and help to chose practices to begin to shift out of this.

Working with Embodied Responses to Anxiety
08:52

This video gently introduces breathwork practice in a simple and choice-based way. You may choose to just notice your breathing, you may choose to deepen it, and you may find it helpful to add a visualization.

Practice: Breathwork Basics
09:56

In this "Self-Holding" practice, the focus is on settling and grounding an overactive nervous system, and on gradually shifting awareness from the external world to your internal experience. Each person may find they need a different amount of time in this practice to experience a shift.

Practice: Self Holding & Grounding
06:19

When we feel anxious, we often feel a loss of safety and a loss of control. This is why control-seeking behaviours are so common in anxiety. In this simple practice, the intention is to support the experience of choice making in the body. By moving between simple shapes of strength, boundaries and reach, you may begin to re-establish a felt sense of choice and control between your body and the space around you.

Practice: Choice Making & Boundaries
06:32
+ Anxiety and Relationships
3 lectures 29:09

In this lesson, we begin to explore the connection between anxiety and our relationships. Often our lifetime level or anxiety is wired into us at a young age depending on how safe and predictable our relationships were. Positive and negative relationship experiences through the lifetime can also effect our anxiety levels.  Often our anxiety is directly or indirectly about relationship, whether that is fear of losing someone, fear of being alone, fear of rejection or other types of disconnection. Sometimes relationships can create anxiety when they are too intense or overwhelming for us.

When we had experiences of support from others, we learn over time ways to manage our anxiety responses. This is called co-regulation. Many of us did not have enough of these types of experiences, so this is a skill we need to continue to build. The important lesson from this lecture is that rarely will we learn to live well with anxiety all by ourselves. The safety, responsiveness and predictability of our relationships will be a key piece in learning to live with anxiety.

The Connection Between Anxiety & Relationships
10:17

The Polyvagal Theory can help us better understand how we experience relationships with other people, and what types of relationships may help or worsen our anxiety. As social creatures, we have the ability to send and receive signals of safety or danger with each other. If we are feeling anxious, being around people who send signal of safety can help is to co-regulate (and eventually self regulate).

This can be tricky however, because our life experiences also can shape how safe we feel in relationship with other people. When we are anxious, we are more likely to interpret relationships as potentially dangerous. Our perceived level of our own safety if call neuroception. Under many of the control-based behaviour that often come with anxiety (food, cleaning, perfection, emotional control), is a need and an attempt to feel safe.

The Polyvagal Theory & Neuroception
09:28

In this video, you are introduced to the idea of "character patterns" from Hakomi psychotherapy, and the idea that our core  relationship beliefs show up in our bodies. The 3 patterns most often associated with anxiety - Sensitive/Withdraw, Generous/Dependant, Alert/Self-reliant - are introduced along with entering a mindful state. Basic shifts in body form and nourishing phrases are offered to experiment with new "felt senses" in relationships.

Practice: Relationship Postures & Beliefs
09:24
+ Ayurvedic Approaches to Anxiety
3 lectures 27:25

In this lecture, we explore some introductory concepts related to anxiety from the science of Ayurveda. Ayurveda is an ancient system of healing from India that is build on the foundation of interconnectedness of our mind, bodies, environments, and nature. Two principles from Ayurveda: "the microcosm is a reflection of the macrocosm" and "everything we consume is food" are explained to understand how states of mind, such as Rajas, and accumulations of Vata energy (air and ether), can contribute to anxiety.

Introduction to Ayurveda
08:58

This lecture builds on the wisdom of Ayurveda but introducing "Dinacharya", the daily rhythm. Our bodies thrive with rhythm and routine so one way to decrease anxiety and excess Vata is to sync up our natural rhythms with the rhythms of the day. The energetic qualities of the 24 hour day are explained with some suggestions for lifestyle practices.

Daily Rhythms
09:18

This third lecture on Ayurveda discusses the concept of Vata Dosha more specifically and things that may increase or decrease it. Considerations for movement, planning, food/drink, and temperature are discussed as holistic lifestyle habits to reduce excess Vata and increase physical resilience to anxiety.

Reducing Vata
09:09
+ Anxiety and Herbal Resources
3 lectures 19:23

In a holistic approach to living with anxiety, consideration is also made to what we consume in the form of foods, beverages and medicines. This section introduce some basic herb and supplements that can be supportive to the body when dealing with anxiety. This information is meant to be general only. Always consult your health care provider prior to adding new herbs or supplements to your routine, especially if you take medication.

Introduction to Herbal Resources
03:18

This video introduces you to 4 herbs in the sedative-hypnotic category of herbs. These herbs are used for bouts of anxiety that include insomnia, excessive worry and panic. The herbs discussed are Lemon Balm, Valerian Root, Skullcap and Passionflower.

Sedative Hypnotic Herbs
09:18

This video introduces you to herbs and foods that are considered adaptogens. These medicines help build resilience in the nervous system and immune system, and help nourish the body systems after prolonged periods of stress, anxiety and burnout.

Adaptogens
06:47
+ Closing Reflections
1 lecture 02:43

Congratulations on making it through the course! Take a moment to consider the things that have resonated with you throughout this course. Reducing anxiety in your life is neither quick nor easy, but by integrating the different tools and practices from this course, you may begin to soothe your nervous system, strengthen your relationships, and nourish your body. Consider now a first step you could begin today to start to live well with anxiety.

Final Reflections: Moving Forward
02:43