Ethical Hacking with Hardware Gadgets
4.0 (1,062 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
34,109 students enrolled

Ethical Hacking with Hardware Gadgets

Learn all about USB attacks, USB Rubber Ducky, HID Attacks, BadUSB, keystroke injections, WiFi jamming.
4.0 (1,062 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
34,109 students enrolled
Created by Valentin Despa
Last updated 2/2018
English
English [Auto-generated]
Current price: $12.99 Original price: $19.99 Discount: 35% off
7 hours left at this price!
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This course includes
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • 2 articles
  • 2 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • Explore the threat landscape: USBs, WiFi jammers
  • Learn common tools and techniques used
  • Practical skillset in defeating hardware-based threats
  • Extend your cyber security know-how for hardware-based tools
Requirements
  • General IT know-how
  • possibility of installing new software (Windows, macOS)
  • Interest in IT-Security and hardware projects
  • basic programming know-how
Description

In this course we will have a look at a couple of hardware gadgets which can be used for hacking.

USB Hacking

I will present you how a keystroke injection attack works and present USB sticks like USB Rubber Ducky and while show you how to write your own scripts to exploit this vulnerability. 

In a series of lecture I will show you how you can build a lower-cost version of the USB Rubber Ducky by using cheap Chinese made development boards which are compatible with the Arduino platform.

After you understand how the attack works and are able to build your own device, I will explain what options are available in order to protect yourself. 

WiFi jamming

WiFi Jammers or to call them more properly WiFi deauthers, are basically a very easy way of kicking everybody out from a specific Wi-Fi network and if wanted, making the Wi-Fi network useless. 

This section is dealing with a known vulnerability in the IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi) protocol even with WPA2. While the data you are transferring by the Wi-Fi network is encrypted and better protected, the problem are the so called management frames that are not always authenticated, thus allowing an attacker for example to disconnect the devices from the network by sending a so-called deauthentication frame, used to terminate a connection.

I will show you how it is done and what you can do to protect yourself.

Expected more?

I plan to explore other devices and attack techniques, based on your feedback!

Who this course is for:
  • Users interested in IT-security and and privacy
  • Anyone who wants to extend their know-how in IT-security
  • Network / IT Administrators
Course content
Expand all 15 lectures 45:41
+ Introduction
1 lecture 00:38

A word of caution before continuing

Preview 00:38
+ BadUSB (USB Rubber Ducky and derivatives)
7 lectures 26:32

The Rubber Ducky is probably the most popular and known product on the market. What it actually does is to register itself as a keyboard when plugged in and to start typing a pre-defined sequence of commands (also named as a keystroke injection attack).

Preview 01:37

Let me do a short demo to exemplify how the bad USB works.

Preview 00:34

In this lecture we will have a look at the hardware that we will be using. One option is to use the original USB Rubber Ducky or a compatible, and much cheaper, device. 

Hardware
01:56

In this lecture you will learn what kind of software do we need in order to write a specific set of instructions to the USB stick. 

Software
06:21

In this lecture we will put all the pieces together and actually write a sequence of instructions on the USB device.

Running Your First Keystroke Payload Hack
06:26

Learn what you can do to protect against malicious USBs.

Defence
05:01

To understand where we stand today, it can be useful to look back and learn how we got here. We will do a short history of the Bad USB and talk about the Teensy USB Development Board, Phantom Keystroker, USB Rubber Ducky and much more.

Preview 04:37
+ WiFi Jamming (WiFi deauth attack)
6 lectures 18:16

This section is dealing with a known vulnerability in the IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi) protocol. The problem are the so called management frames that are not always authenticated, thus allowing an attacker for example to disconnect the devices from the network by sending a so-called deauthentication frame, used to terminate a connection.

Preview 03:34

A short demo on how the Wi-Fi deauher works.

Preview 01:53

We will be using a development board with an embedded ESP8266 chip. This is a Wi-Fi chip and MCU (microcontroller unit)  makes Wi-Fi connections possible.

Hardware
01:34

We will be using an open source project, created as a proof of concept for demonstrating this WiFi vulnerability.

There are two ways to get your board up and running. You can compile the project yourself and upload it with the Arduino IDE. Because this method requires a series of steps to get it running, in this video I will show you a simpler method with the same outcome. Still if you want to go the Arduino way, I will link you the documentation.

Software setup
07:24

Next we will power the board and configure the admin interface. After that I will show you how to start your first deauth attack.

Running Your First WiFi deauth attack
03:32

We will have a look at what you can do to protect yourself.

Defence - Preventing deauthentication attacks
00:19
+ Conclusion
1 lecture 00:15

Next steps.

Conclusion and other hardware gadgets
00:15