Emergency Planning & Preparedness for the COVID-19 PANDEMIC
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Emergency Planning & Preparedness for the COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Easily Plan For Your Family's Future With Everything You Need to Know About Pandemic Preparation
New
3.0 (1 rating)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
3 students enrolled
Created by Mia Shark
Last updated 4/2020
English
English [Auto-generated]
Price: $19.99
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
This course includes
  • 2.5 hours on-demand video
  • 16 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • How To Plan, NOT Panic! You’ll learn how to ask the right questions that you can ACT ON NOW and to create a SMART plan for whatever life throws at us and stop stressing!
  • How To Stay Healthy - The safety measures you haven’t thought of in a practical guide to keep the virus OUT OF YOUR HOME to keep you and your loved ones healthy.
  • Corona Kit Checklist. Ditch the anxiety & the crowded virus filled shopping centers the items you need. THE BEST PART: they arrive on your doorstep with the click of a button!
  • Simple, Step By Step Emergency Plan. Yes, planning can seem overwhelming. With explainer videos that are comprehensive, yet easy to execute you will be confident that you will be the Hero!
Requirements
  • None
Description

The purpose of this course is to help you keep your loved ones safe. It draws on decades of experience in the areas of emergency first response, disaster management and research into rapid-onset natural disasters. It is an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand and easy-to-adopt set of examples from some seriously educated people and their personal experiences dealing with stressful emergency situations, including the current COVID-19 situation. It will help you get your mind in the right place, avoid anxiety and panic, get organized and be smart.

Who this course is for:
  • People who want to be well-equipped during emergency/pandemic situations.
  • People who are overwhelmed with the clutter of information available on the web related to COVID-19 and definitely want an in-depth plan and workbooks about pandemic preparation that are already laid out to them.
Course content
Expand all 35 lectures 02:28:40
+ PLAN, DON'T PANIC
4 lectures 21:25

What you will learn in this Course?

  • By learning and acting on this content, you will be better informed, more calm, and far better organized than most for dealing with the current national emergency.

  • You will avoid countless hours of surfing online and guessing what is “old information” and what is the most “current thinking” about safety precautions.

  • You will become far more confident and capable of dealing with what has happened and what may happen tomorrow. You will gain knowledge and understanding that you can apply to future emergency settings; making you and your family safer.


Goal For This Course:

A practical guide to help you be smart about planning and preparations

The purpose of this course is to help you keep your loved ones safe. It draws on decades of experience in the areas of emergency first response, disaster management and research into rapid-onset natural disasters. It is an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand and easy-to-adopt set of examples from some seriously educated people and their personal experiences dealing with stressful emergency situations, including the current COVID-19 situation. It will help you get your mind in the right place, avoid anxiety and panic, get organized and be smart.


“The COVID-19 outbreak is not a one-way street. You can push this virus back. Your actions now will determine the course of the outbreak.”

– Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, World Health Organization, March 2, 2020


If you are the type that needs to jump to the bottom line, here you go:

To survive any disaster a good “general emergency plan” is to:

  • Stop acting crazy; slow down and think

  • Acquire information voraciously

  • Commit to a daily assessment of your situation

  • Find multiple data sources

  • Don’t guess: Plan well, execute decisively, stick to your plan, and for everyone’s sake don’t panic

  • Don’t do stupid things, and stay calm

  • Understand why planning and precautions are critical

  • Understand the nature of the COVID-19 threat

  • Conduct a simple assessment of you and your family’s situation

  • Create an emergency plan for you and your family

  • Know what precautions you and your family need to take

  • Put into immediate use some practical tools for ensuring safe behavior








                                                                                               DISCLAIMER

Emergency planning and preparedness coaching is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition. It is not intended to substitute for the advice, treatment and/or diagnosis of a qualified licensed health professional. This material is not intended to make any medical diagnoses, claims and/or substitutes for your personal physician’s care. As emergency planning and preparedness consultants we do not provide a second opinion or in any way attempt to alter the treatment plans or therapeutic goals/recommendations of your personal physician or any designated emergency response professional in your jurisdiction. It is our role to partner with you to provide information, examples, and practical suggestions as you create your own emergency plan and you decide which, if any, suggested precautions are worthwhile for you and your family’s specific situation.

Preview 05:56

About your Instructor:

  • Emergency Aid First Responder, and Emergency Aid First Responder Instructor


  • 16 Years of Emergency Aid service and Emergency Aid Instructor experience


  • Co-author, “Covid-19 Emergency Planning” (published 3/15/2020), currently co-authoring “Covid-19 Home Care for the Sick” (pending 3/18/2020)


Details:

  • INSTRUCTOR Qualifications in Medical Training for Emergency Aid First Responders, certified and experienced in training the following courses:

  • Primary Care for life threatening emergencies (First Aid in Emergency settings)

  • Secondary Care (First Aid for adult and youth)

  • Care for Children (First Aid on infants and children)

  • CPR & AED (CPR training and use an AED, automated external defibrillator)

  • First Aid at Work (Enhanced CPR and first aid training for the workplace)

  • EFR Refresher (Emergency First Aid refresher)

  • RESPONDER Qualifications and Training as an Emergency First Aid Responder

  • CPR Certified

  • AED Certified

  • Oxygen Administration Certified

  • PADI Staff Instructor certified (includes training for on-water medical evaluation, emergency rescue, advanced emergency first aid as relevant to scuba)

  • PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer certified (incl. emergency skills training)

  • PADI Instructor certified (incl. emergency skills training)

  • PADI Dive Master certified (incl. emergency skills)

  • PADI Rescue diver certified

  • Chief Safety Officer / Rescue Team leader and on-water experience (4 years)

  • Red Cross Standard Child Care First Aid & CPR trained and tested

  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR trained and tested

  • Canadian Red Cross CPR/AED trained and tested

  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR trained and tested

  • Canadian Red Cross Standard First Aid & CPR trained and tested

  • Field Experience (12 years)

Preview 10:22

What’s different about an emergency situation?

In normal situations normal rules apply, in emergency situations normal rules do not apply. You need new rules, new approaches, and new behaviors.

Emergencies are serious, unexpected, and often dangerous situations requiring immediate action. An emergency plan promotes safety awareness and helps you get organized. It helps you get your priorities right, help you take the right precautions, and helps you change your daily routine so you and your loved-ones can be safe.

The lack of an emergency plan could lead to bad mistakes and heaven-forbid, the loss of life. Even though you may not feel it yet in your community, we are in a national emergency, and because this is an emergency, a plan is necessary.


Key Resources:

DAILY EMAILS - XKaliber will attempt to send you email updates.

What You Need To Understand To Plan Effectively
03:50

Contact Us:

Email:  Support@xkaliber.co

Get In Touch
01:17
+ STAYING HEALTHY
9 lectures 44:17

What you will learn in this Chapter?

You will learn the steps you can take to protect yourself, the steps you can take to protect others, how Covid 19 spreads, how easily it spreads and how to create safe habits.


Goal For This Chapter is

To educate you on the most accurate information about the COVID-19/Coronavirus to help you and your loved ones stay healthy and safe.

Introduction: Staying Healthy
00:52

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.


TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF

Practice Social Distancing

  • Avoid people. Which people? All people.

  • Avoid regular store hours and take advantage of 24 hour businesses to shop late at night or very early in the morning.

  • Do not attend public gatherings.

  • Do not go out to crowded public places, like schools, churches, bars, clubs

  • If you must go out, keep your distance from people

Clean Your Hands Often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid Close Contact

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick

  • Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.


TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT OTHERS

Stay Home If You’re Sick

  • Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.

Cover Coughs and Sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

  • Throw used tissues in the trash.

  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Wear a Face Mask If You Are Sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a face mask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a face mask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a face mask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.

  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a face mask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a face mask). Face masks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.

Clean And Disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, counter tops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

Steps To Prevent Illness
06:14

How COVID-19 Spreads:

  1. Through the touching of contaminated surfaces

  2. Viral aerosolization in confined spaces

  3. Through direct contact with infected people with or without symptoms


The best available information (3/13/2020) indicates that the virus is spread three ways:

“Through the touching of contaminated surfaces” – when a sick person coughs the virus is in the little water droplets that comes out. These droplets land on surfaces and dry up. The virus is now on the surface. If a healthy person touches this surface and then touches their face, nose, mouth, they can inhale the virus and get infected. Best data available today suggests the virus can survive on a surface for up to 7 days.


“Viral aerosolization in a confined space” – this means infected people are exhaling in confined spaces, adding viruses to the air, making the air contagious. Research from Germany on March 11th, 2020 demonstrated that there are so many viruses in a sick person’s mouth, nasal passages, and throat, that simply the act of breathing will distribute virus into the surrounding air. The current theory is that “inhaling an infected person’s breath” like at a store, a restaurant, a classroom, or an apartment hallway, is the most likely way the disease is transmitted. This is because with every breath, a person expels water vapor – like the cloud you see if you breath out into cold air on a frosty morning – and in this cloud are viruses. If a healthy person inhales this air, they can get infected.


“Through direct contact with infected people who had no symptoms.” – this means bin direct bodily contact with an infected person such that the virus is passed between them. Touching might not be enough, but something like sharing chicken soup with an infected person from the same bowl with the same spoon, that’s going to get you sick as well.



Which is the most likely way to become infected?

Given the extremely high volume of viruses found in patient’s throats and mouths, the current thinking is by indirectly inhaling infected air. (viral aerosolization in a confined space)


Can someone spread the virus without being sick?

With COVID-19, infected people will be highly contagious before they show symptoms. That’s one of the real bummers about this disease. Unlike with other serious diseases, you won’t know someone is infected and contagious just by looking at them. They won’t have a cough. They won’t look sick. They won’t be tired. So, yes, the current thinking is an infected person will be spreading the virus by breathing on uninfected people through regular daily contact – at work, at home, or on the street.


Can someone get sick from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects?

Research also suggests someone can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads any more.

Study: Study highlights ease of spread of COVID-19 viruses, March 9, 2020



How easily does the COVID-19 virus spread?

Short answer: Very easy, COVID-19 looks to be as easy to catch as the common cold. If you live a normal everyday life in a city and change none of your habits, the chances are very high you will become infected quickly.

Longer answer: Still very easy, but you can change your chances of becoming infected on any given day, and slow the rate of spread by changing your normal everyday behavior and staying clean. For many, the longer they avoid getting infected and sick, the better their chances of survival.


Summary of various expert views regarding what COVID-19 means (as estimated on 3/10/2020) :

According to the most current published literature COVID-19 is the result of a new type of coronavirus that has not previously been identified. According to the World Health Organization it has reached pandemic proportions with almost 60 countries reporting cases. It is a hard-to-detect illness that has a relatively long contagious period before the display of easy-to-spot symptoms (maybe 5 days on average before symptoms, but possibly much longer, i.e. up to 15 days). As a pandemic, experts openly recognize it as already causing severe health, social, and economic impact. As a disease, it is easy to catch; as easy to catch as a common cold. According to some countries, namely Germany, up to 70% of the population is likely to become infected over the next two years.

It reportedly attacks the respiratory system and specifically the lungs, similar to a bad cold or the flu, so is especially serious for someone with weak immunity and weak respiratory systems. It has two major differences with the common flu though: there is no vaccine and there are no specific remedies. As a serious disease, it has a reasonably low general population fatality rate (3%-4%) when medical treatment is readily available for the sick. It is reported to be much more deadly among susceptible groups – older individuals over 60 (+10%) those with weak respiratory systems (+15%), and those with underlying health conditions (+20%).

General health, diet, and supportive treatment can sway the mortality rate up or down. Multiple government sources have advised those living in the US to prepare for significant disruptions over the next few months. This may include school closings, many businesses moving to telecommuting, and the requirement to self-medicate given that only the most serious cases (about 15% to 20%) are expected to require hospitalization.

So now you have a pretty good idea of COVID-19 and the situation as reported.

How COVID-19 Spreads
06:13

In our example, there are four big things we are doing:

  • Isolating ourselves

  • Keeping our home clean and virus free

  • Keeping ourselves healthy

  • Training ourselves to become instinctively “safe” , which is really the most important thing.


There are many ways to protect yourself and to reduce the chances of becoming infected on any given day. You do not need to be a doctor to learn how to do this. You don’t need weeks of training. You need to know what to do and a system to make sure you do all that you are supposed to do. It’s like using a microwave. When someone first tries a microwave, they are all nervous: “How am I ever going to remember to not put metal inside?” At first they are cautious, but they learn. Ok, don’t put an uncovered bowl of chilli inside and set it on high for three minutes because it’s going to explode and splatter everywhere! Like, what a mess! If you think for a second, about you and your microwave now, I am sure you know the rules. It is instinctive. You wouldn’t ever put metal inside. You know this without anyone having to remind you. That’s what this important section is about. Learning the precautions you can take and how to make following safety rules, an instinct.

So, if you wish to protect yourself and others from COVID-19, let’s talk though an example of the precautions that many families are currently following, including my own. These are the precautions that are helping us live without committing any major “unsafe act” at any time. We will also cover at the end of this section the approach we are using to help us conquer our usual daily habits that are now unsafe in this emergency situation.

Don’t worry about writing anything down, or trying to memorize this material. At the end of this section there will be a summary and all of this information is included in the Emergency Planning Recommendations Document you downloaded.

Let’s get into it by going through in detail, one real world example.


Precaution 1: Isolate yourself and your family

Isolate yourself and your family – what does that mean?

To my family it means:

  • Avoiding close contact with people – any people – those who look healthy and those who are sick.

  • Avoiding going out in public and especially avoiding confined public spaces.

  • If you have to go out, it means limiting your time in public and changing your habits to reduce the chance of contact with surfaces

  • Even in the home with others, we are limiting physical interaction


Let’s talk about avoiding close contact.

This will be hard, as most of us have not set as a life goal, to become a happy and content “hermit” with no human interaction. Now, if you generally hate being around people and are happy to be alone, wow, you are going to love the next three months for sure!

For the rest of us, think about how much close contact you might have every normal day. You get up, you might have a spouse and kids. In less than 20 minutes, you will be in close contact with 3 people. Now, you do what you usually do, drive kids to school. If you get out of your car and say your usually “good mornings” with little hugs, add another 3 people. If you do not have to be in the office until later, maybe you go to a class at the gym for an hour, add another 12 people. You shower and change in the gym’s locker room and shook hands with a person at the front desk, add 6 more. You go for coffee, and luckily the line is short, so only add 5 people. It’s not even 9:30am and you have already had close contact with 29 people. At the end of any normal day in the life of a city-dweller, most of us will have had close contact with more than 100 people, and many will have close contact with over 200.

What could we cut out if we wanted to avoid close contact with people?


Well, if schools you have pulled your kids out of school or your schools are already closed, no need to drive the kids , reduce your count by 3.

Drop the gym class, yeah! Reduce by 12 people

No gym class, no showering and greeting the front desk, wow, save another 6

Make your own coffee at home, hey, fantastic, reduce by 5 more

If you have been practicing “avoid close contact” It’s now 9:30am and instead of 29 people, you have had contact with 3.


Rethinking your entire “normal day” could easily reduce your “close contacts” with people by 90%. It is almost statistically impossible that you have not reducing the chances of you becoming infected on this day.

Let’s choose another example, a regular day in the office. You live in a nice studio apartment near Telegraph Hill in San Francisco, and you walk to work in the Financial District. It’s 9:00am and literally, you have not been in close contact with anyone. Score is 0 (zero). But now you walk in and get in line for the elevator, and even though its not as crowded as usual, add 7 people. Your office has an open floor plan, add 25 people. You attend 1 morning meeting, add 4 people, go to lunch in the building at the lunch bar, add another 25. By 1pm, you too are well on your way to be in close contact with 100 people even though you live alone.

If you must be around others, try to practice social distancing, no handshaking, no hugging, stay 6 feet away from others. If someone is obviously sick, do not get in the same room with them. If someone is coughing at the other end of the grocery aisle, turn you and your cart around and head the opposite way. If a neighbor comes by looking deathly ill, and is knocking at your door, tell them you are on the phone with county health to get updated on self-quarantine procedures.


Avoid going out in public.

This is also hard to do. If you want to catch this virus quickly, do what you always do: drop kids at school, talk to other parents about getting together over dinner and drinks to plan for Coronavirus, then a trip to the grocery store, then the bank, then the pharmacy, then the drive-through for lunch, then power-lifting at the gym, etc. If you want to avoid catching this virus for as long as possible, the recommendation is to avoid going out in public, which means no going out, period.


If you have to go out, limit your time in public and change your habits.

Treat every trip out of your home as if you are a Forward Reconnaissance Specialist for the U.S. Marines, or if you prefer, you are James or Jane Bond. Your mission: do not let the virus catch you while still gathering all that you are supposed to gather.


As James or Jane Bond, you would obviously want to limit how many places you have to go, bunch your errands together so you are out of your safe house only once, and be very focused on what you have to get done. For maximum safety, you may assume every public place you visit and every public surface you touch, is contaminated.

Precautions: What can I do to protect myself and others from COVID-19?
11:02

Here is a set of procedures to limit your chance of being in contact with contagious people:

  1. Make your list of what you have to do and your going out plan.

  2. Pick a time that fewer people are out. Visiting the 24/7 grocery and swinging by the bank machine at 5 am will put you in contact with a lot fewer people than if you did the same thing at 10 am.

  3. Reduce your frequency. If you go to the grocery 4 times a week to buy food, figure out the way to go only 1 time.

  4. Assuming you are driving: keep disposable gloves, hand sanitizer or rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle, disinfectant, and a garbage bag in the front seat. When you are ready to go into the store, put on a clean and new pair of gloves. Don’t touch everything in the store. Assuming the place is contaminated. Be quick when shopping. Avoid everyone.

  5. When you get back to your car, open the car door, take your gloves off and put them in the trash bag, sanitize your hands.

  6. Repeat at every stop you make. Don’t wear gloves that have been outside in public and then in the car, and go back and forth. Assume the gloves are contaminated.

  7. When you return home, use a disinfecting wipe around the interior of your car. Carry the wipe, and use this to disinfect the outside of the car door and to open the doors to get into your apartment, touch the elevator buttons, and get into your house.

  8. Now assume you or your clothes have touched a virus and are contaminated.

  9. Take off your outside shoes, spray them, and leave them outside.

  10. Keep hand sanitizer at your front door. Sanitize or wash hands before you do anything else.

  11. Take off your clothes (don’t be bashful), and put them straight into the washing machine. Avoid touching surfaces. Take a shower.

Is this a perfect approach? No, but it is an approach that should prevent you from becoming infected quickly.

11 Tips to Limit Your Chance of Contact With Contagions
05:33

The procedures involve making one assumption: when you go out in public, you and all your clothes become contaminated. So what can you do?

  1. First, keep cleaning and disinfecting supplies at your front door and in your car.

  2. Have outside shoes and inside shoes, so outside shoes stay outside.

  3. Before entering a home, spray rubbing alcohol or any typical household cleaner on the soles of your shoes and take them off outside.

  4. After you have entered your home, disinfect your hands with sanitizer.

  5. Remove your contaminated clothes, walk them straight to the washing machine and wash them right away.

  6. Sanitize your hands one more time.


Will these steps guarantee the virus won’t get in your home? No. But it should slow down how soon it does, and thus how soon you and your loved ones get infected.

Keeping the Virus OUT of your Home
02:10

Washing your hands is easy, and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of germs. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community—from your home and workplace to childcare facilities and hospitals.


Follow these five steps every time.

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.

  2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.

  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.

  4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.

  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

How To Wash Your Hands... If you didn't know already...
02:03

Yes, you will need to train yourself to do this. It is estimated that unconsciously, the average person touches their face 90 times a day. Let’s remember, to become infected you must inhale the virus into your nose, mouth or lungs. If your hands are contaminated and have virus on them, and you touch your lips, you have just made it super easy for you to inhale it and become infected.

How To Avoid Touching Eyes, Nose, & Mouth
01:34

How to keep coronavirus fears from affecting your mental health


Coronavirus is a serious situation and deserves your vigilance and attention — but the MASSIVE AMOUNT OF information, precautions and warnings can take a real toll on your mental health.


Here are some tips on maintaining a happy medium:

  • Pare down your sources of information. Find a few sources you trust, like the CDC or a community authority, and stick with them. Limit the frequency of your updates, be disciplined with your social media use and know when to walk away.

  • Name your fears. It may help to sit down and really consider what specific threats worry you. If your fears are practical ones, think about a plan: What are other options if you can’t telework? Do you have savings or support? Being prepared for your fears will help keep them in scale.

  • Think outside yourself: Since action can allay our anxieties, you may want to also consider what you can do to help others who may be more affected by the outbreak than you, like service or hourly workers who may have to put themselves in disproportionate danger.

  • Seek support, but do it wisely. If you want to run to a friend to discuss the latest outbreak cluster or your family’s contingency plans, try not to create an echo chamber where overwhelmed people further overwhelm each other.

  • Look for someone who is handling it differently, or for professional help if it’s an available option.

  • Pay attention to your basic needs. Don’t forget the essential, healthy practices that affect your wellbeing every day — getting enough sleep, proper nutrition, physical activity, and getting outside as much as possible.

  • Don’t chastise yourself for worrying. You are allowed to worry or feel bad, and those feelings are valid in times of crisis. The key is to work toward understanding and contextualizing your fears so they don’t keep you from living your healthiest life.

Maintaining Your Mental Wellbeing
08:36
+ COVID-19 SYMPTOMS
1 lecture 02:48

In this chapter you will learn…

What the symptoms of the corona virus are.


Goal For This Chapter…

Is to help you identify when you or a loved one may have COVID-19.


Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.


The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.*

  1. Fever

  2. Cough

  3. Shortness of breath


If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

  • New confusion or inability to arouse

  • Bluish lips or face


*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.








                                                                                               DISCLAIMER

Emergency planning and preparedness coaching is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition. It is not intended to substitute for the advice, treatment and/or diagnosis of a qualified licensed health professional. This material is not intended to make any medical diagnoses, claims and/or substitutes for your personal physician’s care. As emergency planning and preparedness consultants we do not provide a second opinion or in any way attempt to alter the treatment plans or therapeutic goals/recommendations of your personal physician or any designated emergency response professional in your jurisdiction. It is our role to partner with you to provide information, examples, and practical suggestions as you create your own emergency plan and you decide which, if any, suggested precautions are worthwhile for you and your family’s specific situation.

Introduction
02:48
+ YOUR CORONA KIT
1 lecture 03:16

                                                              The Time To Purchase Your Corona Kit Is NOW.

Think about it… there are 327.2 Million people in the United states of America. This pandemic is affecting everyone – no one is exempt. Each person should have these supplies – consider how many people are purchasing each of the items listed, supplies will not last. The time to purchase is now!!!


Consider: If you do not have to go out – don’t! It is considerably safer, more convenient and likely more economical to have these items delivered to your doorstep!!!


We’ve made it easy!!! We have made creating your corona kit as easy as the click of a button for you – simply click on the link and make your purchase, it will arrive right on your doorstep and you will be one of the lucky ones that are fully prepared. Don’t wait – do this now while supplies last. Note: we will be updating this list as items go out of stock, for a full roster of available items visit www.XKaliber.Co.

In this guide, we have included several checklists. Please note that yes, there are duplicate items – because you need duplicate items for each purpose.


Your Corona Kit

This is not hoarding or panic buying, This is smart behavior to ensure that you have enough supplies to last the duration of a quarantine period in which you should not be going into public. Stock up on food, water & medication for at least 2 weeks.

Corona Kit Checklist
03:16
+ ESSENTIALS OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
9 lectures 27:35

In this chapter your will learn…

The elements to help you plan for this emergency. We must remind you again that this is a generic list, and that your family and your unique situation may require additional information.


The goal for this chapter…

Is to ensure you have thoroughly considered who you are creating an emergency plan for and collect the documentation that will help you be more organized.








                                                                                                DISCLAIMER

Emergency planning and preparedness coaching is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition. It is not intended to substitute for the advice, treatment and/or diagnosis of a qualified licensed health professional. This material is not intended to make any medical diagnoses, claims and/or substitutes for your personal physician’s care. As emergency planning and preparedness consultants we do not provide a second opinion or in any way attempt to alter the treatment plans or therapeutic goals/recommendations of your personal physician or any designated emergency response professional in your jurisdiction. It is our role to partner with you to provide information, examples, and practical suggestions as you create your own emergency plan and you decide which, if any, suggested precautions are worthwhile for you and your family’s specific situation.

Introduction: Essentials of Emergency Preparedness
03:23

Emergency planning is IMPORTANT, whether you are an individual, a mom, a dad, a sister, brother, grand son or daughter or maybe you are just a furparent. The bottom line is you need to be prepared and have a plan. In this workbook we are going to ask some critical questions that will help you put together your family unit so you know who you are making a plan for.


INSTRUCTIONS: Answer the questions with the name of the people that are depending on you to get the plan right.

Please download the worksheet provided.

Who Is Depending On Me?
04:17

Making the decision who your plan is for is a critical first step in developing your Emergency Preparedness Plan. Are you making a plan for… …You? …For you and a significant other? …For a small family with very young children? …Two elderly parents? …A group of friends? Your plan will depend on the exact characteristics and needs of the individuals in your core family unit, or your crew.

This worksheet is designed to validate that you are planning for the right family/crew.


INSTRUCTIONS: There are seven core questions specific to the COVID-19 situation and to validate the viability of being part of your family crew, although there are many more questions you may want to ask yourself. The first four help determine the level of risk for this one individual. Low / Medium / High Risk. The last three questions help determine if they are going to “fit well” in the family or crew to enable you and your family/crew to make the best decisions possible.


Step 1: Start by listing each person in your family, starting with yourself and your immediate family (spouse, children).

Step 2: List close relations (parents, brothers, sisters, significant others).

Step 3: List additional people you identified in the “Who Is Depending On Me” worksheet that have not been listed or any   others not listed.

Step 4: Consider each person. Mark a 1 if this person falls into the category.

Step 5: Once you have answered all questions for all individuals, total the numbers for each person.

Step 6: Examine your result and make the determination WHO IS INCLUDED IN YOUR PLAN with a yes or a no.


Please download the worksheet provided.

Who Is In Your Family?
03:37

INSTRUCTIONS: Complete the following worksheet for all people & pets in your family or crew. We recommend distributing copies of this worksheet to each member of your family or crew and posting this worksheet in a safe visible place such as your refrigerator.


Please download the worksheet provided.

Family Contact Work Sheet
01:53

INSTRUCTIONS: Complete the following worksheet for each individual in your family or crew. We also recommend putting a copy of this sheet in the individual’s Bug Out bag and in the master family Bug Out bag, just in case.


Please download the worksheet provided.

Individual Medical Information
01:51

INSTRUCTIONS: Create a FILE for each family member and put COPIES of the following documents into their folder. Each individual should retain the original copy of the document on their person. If you want to be really safe, create 2 sets of files for each and put one file in your Bug Out Bag.


Please download the worksheet provided.

Critical Information Worksheet
02:45

INSTRUCTIONS: Create a FILE for each family member and put COPIES of the following documents into their folder. Each individual should retain the original copy of the document on their person. If you want to be really safe, create 2 sets of files for each and put one file in your Bug Out Bag.


Please open the checklist provided, simply click on the links and make your purchase.

Corona Kit Checklist
01:15

INSTRUCTIONS: Memorize these 23 behaviors. Each time you make a mistake during the day, mark the column. Tally the marks to get a number. Add all the numbers together to get a “day score.” The first days your scores may be high, but in time they will reduce significantly. It is possible, even probable, to go from total day score of 100 (very risky), and get down to a score of under 10 (very safe) in under two weeks.

You can also gamify this with children or even adults – who ever gets the lowest score wins a prize each day, and the winner at the end of the week gets the grand prize each week.


Please download the worksheet provided.

Creating Good Safety Habits Workbook
03:17

Planning for each phase of the pandemic is important as each phase will require a well thought out plan. Announcements on the news may tell you the pandemic has arrived, but until you see it locally – with school closing, businesses closings, etc. – you may not think it is serious. In this case with COVID-19, the time from one case in your neighborhood to many cases and major disruptions seems to happen quickly.

This workbook is some of the Signals you can watch out for and what you can Expect.


Please download the worksheet provided.

Theoretical Phases of the COVID-19 Pandemic
05:17
+ FAMILY EMERGENCY PLAN
11 lectures 49:19

What you will learn in this Chapter?

What we will share with you now are ten elements to help you plan for this emergency. We must remind you again that this is a generic list, and that your family and your unique situation may require additional information. This list is based on the emergency preparation list of the American Red Cross. The explanations and the details have been provided by our team of emergency preparedness and planning consultants.


Please download the workbook/pdf provided.








                                                                                                      DISCLAIMER

Emergency planning and preparedness coaching is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease or condition. It is not intended to substitute for the advice, treatment and/or diagnosis of a qualified licensed health professional. This material is not intended to make any medical diagnoses, claims and/or substitutes for your personal physician’s care. As emergency planning and preparedness consultants we do not provide a second opinion or in any way attempt to alter the treatment plans or therapeutic goals/recommendations of your personal physician or any designated emergency response professional in your jurisdiction. It is our role to partner with you to provide information, examples, and practical suggestions as you create your own emergency plan and you decide which, if any, suggested precautions are worthwhile for you and your family’s specific situation.

Introduction: Family Emergency Plan
01:41

Is my current location/shelter adequate and safe?

Is my workplace safe?

Is my city/town safe?

Is my shelter near essential services that will be operational?

Will the attractiveness of my shelter change if we get told to “shelter in place?”

How realistic is it that I move to another location?

How long have we got before relocation may not be possible?

How do I know which shelter is best for me and my family?

Shelter
03:07

Beyond your home, are you in a neighborhood that is safe?

How accustomed are you to behaving in a “safe manner”?

Are you able to protect yourself? Can you protect others?

Do you feel financially secure?

Bottom line, do you feel physically safe and secure?

Safety & Security
03:24

Do you have the ability to store food for an extended period?

Should you change your food preferences?

How much food do you need to secure?

How many different food stores are nearby?

Is bulk food buying just panicking and hoarding?

Food & Water
04:14

How many different technology options do you have for getting local information?

How dependent are you on the internet?

What are the best sources of information on television?

What are the best sources of information on radio?

Where to go for accurate information?

Technology - for Information
03:00

Do you have sufficient home internet for work?

Do you have sufficient home internet and devices for education?

Considering all the internet needs you have now and in the near term, is it possible to improve your service?

What are the chances that your internet becomes unstable?

What are the backup technologies?

Technology - for Work & Education
03:02

Do you know the symptoms?

Do you know how to tell the difference between the flu, corona virus and a bad cold?

Do you know how to use that thermometer?

Would you know the difference between a red, sore throat and say, a green one?

What about everything else?

Health - Monitoring Physical Health
03:07

Have the people in your family been emotionally compromised?

Have you been emotionally compromised?

Five warning signs:

     a) prolonged sadness and irritability,

     b) extremely high and low mood swing,

     c) fear, worry, or anxiety,

     d) social withdrawal, and

     e) dramatic changes in eating or sleeping habits

Health - Monitoring Mental Health
02:51

Why exactly are they high risk?

What guidance can their doctors give right now?

If they do become infected, what is the plan?

Who will take care of this high-risk person if they get sick?

What extra precautions should you be taking?

Health - Planning for a Person at High Risk
04:26

What do you like to do by yourself or with family members that most relieves stress?

What does each family member like to do most?

What stress-relieving things can you do together during the day?

What stress-relieving things can you do together at night?

What stress-relieving things can you do together that involves physical activity?

Leisure & Entertainment Considerations
05:12

Thank you for choosing our course. We hope you and your family & loved ones stay happy and healthy.

EXAMPLE OF AN EMERGENCY PLAN AND A GOODBYE
15:15