How to Finance a Black Women-owned Business in 2020

What it takes today
Rating: 4.9 out of 5 (22 ratings)
1,237 students
How to Finance a Black Women-owned Business in 2020
Rating: 4.9 out of 5 (22 ratings)
1,237 students
Business Planning, your business credit history: Dun and Bradstreet.
Data and Resources for Black women businesses
The best non profit, local/state/federal resources
Steps in the business financing process
What type of financing products and sources/investors/lenders are best for your business
Why you should seek out venture capital these days. Which ones to go to. How you should approach them.

Requirements

  • Basic familiarity with business terms
  • Desire to own and operate a business

Description

Maggie Lena Walker was the first female bank president of any race to charter a bank in 1902. Black women have continued down this path of entrepreneurship. According to one report, "the number of businesses created by black women in the United States alone is up more than 460% over the last 20 years, making them the fastest growing group of entrepreneurs in the nation."

Of course, we've known this for some time, and have the track record to prove it. We launched MinorityFinance in 1998 and noted that 65% of the inquiries from the site came from Black women. While others have come along after our launch, we remain active and at the forefront.

The key issue then, and now, is money: "according to the Diane Project, black female founders are only able to raise an average of $36,000 in venture funding, while start-ups owned mostly by white males have received on average $1.3 million." We provide data-based advice and instruction, based on our years of experience, to help you over this hurdle.

Our class provides information on the current state of Black women businesses. We provide actionable information you can use to get financing for your business.

AGENDA

• Business Planning

• Your business credit history: Dun and Bradstreet.

• Data and Resources for Black women businesses

• The best non profit, local/state/federal resources

• Steps in the business financing process

• Protecting your ideas: intellectual property rights

• What type of financing products and sources/investors/lenders are best for your business: banks, credit unions, factors, hard money lenders, crowdfunding, credit cards, venture capital, digital currency, ICOs.

• Why you should seek out venture capital these days. Which ones to go to. How you should approach them.

Who this course is for:

  • Entrepreneurs
  • Women
  • African Americans

Course content

1 section • 22 lectures • 40m total length
  • Introduction
    00:19
  • Class agenda and topics
    01:03
  • Business Credit Scores
    01:25
  • Business Loan Resources
    02:14
  • PayPal
    05:09
  • Federal Government Funding
    03:34
  • State/Local Government Funding
    02:29
  • Data on 105 Black & Latino Founders Who Raised $1mm+
    02:30
  • More on 105 Black & Latino Founders Who Raised $1mm+
    01:31
  • Financing Strategies
    01:35
  • How startup funding is supposed to work...
    02:41
  • Why You Should Forget the Previous Slide!
    00:36
  • Business Planning
    01:25
  • Intellectual Property
    01:24
  • Udemy Web Courses (free for paid attendees)
    00:57
  • New Funds
    01:52
  • More investment funds targeted to Black women
    01:19
  • Even more investment funds targeted to Black women.
    01:46
  • Digital Applications
    00:59
  • Gwen Hurt founded and runs Shoe Crazy Wine
    01:01
  • Gwen Hurt on being a Black woman entrepreneur
    04:51
  • Thank you!
    00:12

Instructor

Economist and Author
William Michael Cunningham
  • 4.3 Instructor Rating
  • 94 Reviews
  • 1,453 Students
  • 4 Courses

William Michael Cunningham received his MBA in Finance and a Masters in Economics from The University of Chicago. He is currently a Capstone student advisor in the Real Estate Program at Georgetown University. A strong advocate for the integration of human values in finance, he involves his students in developing new ways to combine social values and investing. His professional interests focus on environmental, social and governance investing, socially responsible investing and community development investing, and his current projects include writing books on crowdfunding, and writing about the impact of the financial crisis on communities of color. Mr. Cunningham serves as Managing Partner for National Crowdfunding Services, and is owner of Creative Investment Research. He is the author of two books on crowdfunding.