Basic Bone Healing

The structure and functions of bone, and how it heals.
Rating: 4.6 out of 5 (348 ratings)
8,973 students
Basic Bone Healing
Rating: 4.6 out of 5 (348 ratings)
8,973 students
Know the structure and cell types involved with bone
Distinguish between two types of bone healing
Understand various factors that can delay or enhance bone healing

Requirements

  • You do not need any prior knowledge of bone healing or Biology for this course
Description

Maybe you have broken a bone before and are curious about what happened inside the body while it was healing, or maybe you are studying for a test that covers bone healing in medical school or high school. For anyone in this situation, this course is quick review that covers the structure and function of bones and how they heal.

We all know what bone is, but not everyone is aware of all of its functions. It's more than just a support structure that prevents you from looking like a jellyfish! This course will give you a good understanding of what bones do besides just that. Learning bone function and form will prepare you for the rest of this course. For example, the course covers the basic kinds of cells and how they are arranged.

In order to take this course, there is only one requirement: that you have bones and know what they are. No invertebrates allowed! Beyond that, everything else is explained. Some grade-school level science and biology would certainly help get you through it too. Nevertheless, it is not just the people new to this subject that can benefit from the course. Doctors and nurses who want a quick refresher can gain from participating as well. This course has a way of speaking to everyone at all levels.

Dr. Josh Simon is a Biomedical Engineer specializing in bone tissue engineering and has worked on numerous medical device projects to develop orthopedic devices. As one of his favorite subjects, basic bone healing is taught throughout this course with a lot of passion, a little humor, and a wealth of knowledge.

Who this course is for:
  • Anyone who has broken a bone and is curious
  • People in the medical field looking for a quick review
Course content
1 section • 5 lectures • 35m total length
  • Introduction to Bone Healing
    00:33
  • What are the basic cells and structure of bone?
    17:54
  • Fracture healing - What are primary and secondary bone healing?
    11:10
  • Further Studies - Cracking through the surface
    05:44
  • Quick Quiz - Basic Bone Healing
    5 questions
  • Suggested Reading
    00:09

Instructor
Medical Device Development Professional
Josh Simon
  • 4.2 Instructor Rating
  • 502 Reviews
  • 9,338 Students
  • 6 Courses

  Currently, I am Principal Consultant at Spiral Medical Development and an Adjunct Professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology.  For over 10 years, I have worked in various roles developing medical devices and have touched perhaps hundreds of them in varying capacities from concept to launch. 

  As someone that loves to give back and feels obligated to teach those that are coming after me in the medical device industry, I have always said that it is important to excel in at least two things. Every day I try to be an example to my coworkers and students by using my experience in research and business to bridge the gap between the two. This usually involves conversations from all perspectives covering project management, medical device product development, marketing, training, and research planning.

Being able to explain tough concepts to audiences without background in a subject has been my forte, and I have used it in numerous device companies, sales training classes, CME, and Grand Rounds presentations around the world. Going the other way, I have conveyed crucial business strategies to motivate product development and research professionals both in industry and academia.   

While my formal training is in general business and Biomedical Engineering with specific interest in bone tissue engineering and biomaterials, I see myself as a translator. The languages of business and science are not often mutually understood, and I act as the intermediary.