Agile Scrum for Beginners

Learn all key concepts of Scrum and play an effective role in a Scrum team!
Rating: 4.3 out of 5 (15 ratings)
766 students
English
English
Understand the history of Agile and differences between the traditional waterfall model and various Agile practices
Learn what scrum is and why it is so powerful for delivering even the most complex project on time
Understand all key concepts of Scrum that you can apply to your projects
Understand the planning poker estimation technique
Assist with your organization's transformation to Agile
Test your understanding throughout the course with quizzes

Requirements

  • No prior knowledge in Agile and Scrum is required
  • It is helpful to have a basic understanding of and interest in Project Management

Description

Brief history of software development processes

In the earliest days of software development, code and fix model was mainly used.  Development team started the work with a very general idea of the product and then repeated the same process of informally coding, testing and fixing issues until the product was ready for release. It was common to forego planning.

The waterfall model was officially identified as an alternative to the code-and-fix model in 1970. The classic waterfall model has served the software development community well for many years. Though this model works well when requirements are simple and crystal clear, and changes are not expected, it is not found suitable for complex products where requirements cannot be finalized upfront and changes are frequently expected. High schedule and cost variances are very common in projects that follow the waterfall model.

Why Scrum?

Many frameworks, models and methods were introduced in 1990’s to address the problems with the waterfall model.  Of all the frameworks and models, Scrum is extremely popular. Scrum follows iterative and incremental approach for development.  Accordingly, a large development work is broken down into smaller chunks and each chunk is delivered iteratively. In Scrum, each iteration is called a Sprint. Each Sprint has a consistent period of 2 to 4 weeks. Sprint is the heart of Scrum. The commitment to short iterations of work is the main reason for the popularity of Scrum.

Scrum is highly suitable for developing, delivering and sustaining complex problems, products or services where requirements are not known upfront and changes are most likely to happen during the course of development.

Why should I take this course?

This course has been created by a software professional who has over 25 years of experience in software development with lots of practical experience in Scrum and other Agile implementations. Moreover, this course covers all key concepts of Scrum with examples and is designed in such a way that anyone who does not know anything about Scrum can easily learn all of them from scratch and play an effective role in a Scrum team. This course will also help enrich the knowledge of  those who already know a little bit of Scrum or currently play the role of Product Owner, Scrum Master or Developer without proper training. Refreshing and gaining more knowledge will make them perform better and more effectively in their roles.

Who this course is for:

  • Anyone who is interested in learning Scrum
  • Product Owners, Scrum Masters and Developers who currently play these roles without proper training
  • Project Managers, Developers, Testers and others who want to migrate to Scrum

Course content

5 sections26 lectures1h 16m total length
  • Course Overview
    02:19

Instructor

Software professional specialized in product development
Dass Devarajan
  • 4.3 Instructor Rating
  • 15 Reviews
  • 4,648 Students
  • 1 Course

Dass Devarajan is a software professional with over 25 years of experience in product development and project management. He has worked for small as well as large organizations, developing large enterprise applications and products, using different technologies and adopting various agile practices.

He started his career as software programmer developing applications using “C” language. Later, he moved on to Java and spent  many years developing various Java based enterprise applications and products, and managing project teams of various sizes.

He obtained his PMP certification from Project Management Institute  (PMI) in 2006. His hands-on experience in various operating systems, languages, technologies, frameworks, tools and techniques combined with his vast managerial experience makes him unique. In the recent past, he worked as Director of Technology in a software company in India. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Engineering.