Chinese Boot Camp
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Chinese Boot Camp

Learn Chinese in a creative and effective way, and speak Chinese that makes sense in most situations
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
42 students enrolled
Created by Edward Wung
Last updated 5/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $90 Discount: 89% off
5 hours left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 8 hours on-demand video
  • 3 Articles
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Converse with native Chinese speakers on basic topics. And, your Chinese will sound reasonably correct in most contexts.
  • Read and write simple sentences
  • Learn the secrets of learning a foreign language successfully
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • No previous knowledge of Chinese is needed
  • You will need a pen and some paper to practice during and after the course.
  • Access to a printer because there will be materials for you to print out to help you optimize the result of your learning.
Description

The course will help you learn how to THINK in Chinese and to speak Chinese that makes sense in most situations. It will also help you get beyond the greetings and you will be carry on with the conversation longer in a meaningful and engaging manner.

I expect your proactive participation. In each video, I will tell you how to practice and usually there will be either a quiz after each unit to help you remember the key concepts of the unit, or an assignment designed to help you internalize what you learn in that unit. Sometimes I will have both a quiz and an assignment. Doing them will be extremely beneficial to you.

Don't rush through the lessons. Make sure you practice every day, even if it's only 10 minutes a day. I recommend that you finish the course in 3 months, and then repeat it a couple more times until you can internalize the concepts conveyed in the course, instead of spreading it out to one year and only do it once.

I can't emphasize the importance of mental preparation too much. You've got to prepare yourself mentally to learn Chinese. Don't dive into the technical aspect of the language without first realizing what you are doing. Thus, I often like to give you some background knowledge or information about a concept I am going to introduce in a lesson. You may choose to skip it, but I believe it's quite valuable to learn within a meaningful context.

I am a professional conference and court interpreter. With my experience and training, I know how to help you unlock your brain to learning a new language successfully, instead of just teaching the language itself. I will share with you my experience and tricks of how to learn Chinese effectively. Sometimes, it will be the stories or advice of other language experts that I've collected over the years. It's the core value of this course and is what set this course apart from the rest.

I am looking forward to working with you and seeing you succeed in this course.


Who is the target audience?
  • This course is designed for those who are serious about learning Chinese and those who want to get pass the basic phrases.
  • The course also aims to help those who might be thinking about doing business with China, a country that is growing robustly and full of possibilities.
  • The course will also benefit you tremendously if you are interested in more than the language itself, but its culture, people, and current trend.
  • If you really care about your time and money and want to get more out of the least time possible, you must take this course. The videos are usually not very long, but are full of rich information, which you will need to spend much time thinking, practicing and internalizing.
  • This is not the course for students who simply want to pass the Chinese courses they are taking in school, and just want to get done with it in a quarter or a semester.
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
53 Lectures
07:55:36
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Introduction and Background Knowledge
5 Lectures 19:30

Welcome to Chinese Boot Camp.

I really can't express my appreciation enough for your time and interest in this course. A teacher's background, experience and training are crucial to the success of your learning. Therefore, in this video, I will let you know why you should take this course from me, if you already are eager to learn Chinese.

I have been:
1. a language instructor for 10 years
2. gone to graduate school of linguistics, focusing on language teaching and assessment
3. a conference and court interpreter for 6 years

As a conference interpreter, I have a very deep understanding of how both languages work, and I am sure I can help you unlock your language learning potential, and help you succeed in learning Chinese.

Preview 04:18

Chinese is fascinating, beautiful and actually quite simple. However, it is everything that's different from English. That's why only learning the basics of Chinese sometimes can't even help you get a basic task done.

You need to be serious about learning Chinese WELL. I don't want you to learn the simple phrases without the broader knowledge and context and feel frustrated when you actually go out and use Chinese.

I promise that I will make the course easy to understand AND remember, and you need to expect to invest some time every day to practice. And, you will be writing a lot, too.

Preview 02:31

After learning German, French, and Japanese (in Japan) myself, I have come to understand that you just can't learn Chinese cold-turkey style.

If you are a native English speaker and you want to learn Spanish, your first Spanish lesson might start with greeting or introducing yourself. It won't work the same with Chinese because it's VERY different from English.

Therefore, my approach is to provide you with extensive background knowledge of Chinese language, and help you prepare and warm up, so that you won't experience the culture shock when you start learning your first Chinese sentence.

Therefore, my first lesson won't start with greeting or introduction. I will help you build the broad linguistic structure, and will add more materials into it through time. It's going to be very different from the traditional language teaching approach.


Preview 02:13

If you have heard of traditional and simplified Chinese, you might still be confused about what they are and how they are different.

In this video, I will explain to you how they are different. They actually only refer to the style of the Chinese writing system. Their meanings, pronunciations, and usages are identical.

A simplified character is just a simplified version of a traditional Chinese character. A close example in English might be "str8" for  "straight", "nite" for "night" and "ab" or abdomen, etc.

Now, imagine THOUSANDS of English words being simplified that way AND officially? That's what happened to Chinese writing system.

In this video, I will tell you how it happens and you can think about it so that you can choose which one you want to learn and stick with down the road.

Preview 03:22

In this video, I am going to show you two examples of how characters are simplified.

You will also get a brief glimpse of how a character is formed and how to write 2 pretty complicated characters.

Preview 07:06

Traditional vs Simplified Chinese
6 questions
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Level 1
37 Lectures 05:46:48

Chinese accents are very complicated because there are just two many dialects in China. You can probably generalize Chinese accents into 2 styles, northern and southern. Please don't impose your stereotype of the northern and southern accents of American English into Chinese accents. They are very different, and the categorization is indeed VERY generalized.

I will also explain to you that I speak Taiwanese accent, which is southern accent. And people in China usually love Taiwanese accent. It's sort of like how American people feel about British accent. There is little issue of understanding or communication between northern and southern accents.

This might be the last portion of the background knowledge of Chinese, introduced in a very simple and short way. Now you are ready to learn some real Chinese.

Preview 02:58

Are there only a few accents in China?

Understanding Accents
3 questions

Please watch this video as many times as it takes for you to internalize the basic Chinese sentence structure.

In this video, I will teach you the most important, even though it's basic, sentence structure, so that in real life situation, if you don't have all the Chinese words you need in a sentence, you can still mesh your sentence with some English words, and your Chinese sentence will still make sense and be understood.

Even though it's basic sentence structure, it governs ALL Chinese sentences. When sentences get longer and more complicated, they will still fall under this basic structure. That's why Chinese is actually not as complicated as you might have believed.

There will also be some "interactive" exercises in this video.

Lesson 1: Basic Sentence Structure
07:35

This is a summary of the unit Basic Chinese Sentence Structure. Feel free to download it to your smart devices, or print it out and read it when you have a chance.

I also explained what it means when people say things in different orders, specifically in English and in Chinese. It's more than the mere difference between where you put the verbs. The truth is quite interesting.

Review: Basic Chinese Sentence Structure
00:05

There are actually no differences in the form of a singular noun and a plural noun in Chinese.

But, it's not that Chinese speakers don't have the concept of singular and plural. It's just that Chinese speakers don't care as much. Plus, in Chinese, there are different mechanism to express and determine the number of a noun.

However, you need to get over it and get used to this. Once you get it, you will find that Chinese is actually very concise in this regard.

There are also some "interactive" exercises in this video. Make sure you follow along and practice with me.

Lesson 2.1: Singular vs Plural
06:12

Every language has its easy part. In Chinese, this is IT!

Chinese verbs are very easy because they don't conjugate, meaning they don't have different grammatical forms according to tense, mood, number or person.

This video is a quick intro to that concept. Take a look and feel good about it.

Lesson 2.2: Chinese Verbs Basics
02:42

Tones are a very abstract concept for speakers of European languages. Tones do not exist in those languages and they are completely different from intonations.

Intonations are for sentences, and it doesn't change the core meaning of a sentence.

On the contrary, tones are for EACH word, or character. It doesn't change with whatever emphasis you want to put on it. And, if you change the tone of a character, you change its meaning.

In this video, I will explain to you:

1. why it's critical to get the tones right,
2. how many tones are there,
3. how they sound,
4. how to practice them,
5. and much more.

You must watch this video and practice along as many times as it takes until you feel that you get it. I am not going to lie to you and tell you that tones are easy. Trust me. I know. Some English native speakers are almost completely deaf to the tones in Chinese. It takes time for your brain to establish the neurons to be able to hear and remember them.

Practice along and watch this video repeatedly.

Lesson 3.1: Introduction to Tones
16:50

This is one of the many practices for tones I designed for you. Make sure you watch and listen to the instruction as to how to denote tones and how to do this exercise.

The same instruction won't be included in the rest of the exercises, so that you can just play the video and start practicing.

You will need paper and a pen to do these exercises. You will also need to pause the video constantly to allow yourself to write the answers.

Tonal Practice -01
11:04

Here is more tonal practice for you. You may choose to skip this practice and come back for it later. I recommend you do this exercise as many times as it takes until you are comfortable moving on to the next topic. More tonal practices might be added later, so come back and check sometimes.

Tonal Practice -02
05:06

Here is more tonal practice for you. You may choose to skip this practice and come back for it later. I recommend you do this exercise as many times as it takes until you are comfortable moving on to the next topic. More tonal practices might be added later, so come back and check sometimes.

Tonal Practice -03
05:08

Chinese characters!!!! Finally!!!

I know you can't wait to show your friends that you can write Chinese. Well, hate to break it to you, but not so fast.

In this video, I will show you:

1. why it's necessary to use characters, instead of just phonetic spellings,
2. how to practice writing characters,
3. some more important information about characters.

Please make sure that you download and print out the Writing Pad in the next lecture, and have it ready all the time when you need to write Chinese characters.


Lesson 3.2: Intro to Chinese Characters
05:02

Download this writing pad and print it out. Make multiple copies of it. Use it EVERY time when you practice writing Chinese. It's indispensable for your retention of Chinese characters. Do it from the very start. (Plus, I designed this writing pad myself.) 

Writing Pad
00:06

Why can't we just write Chinese phonetically?

I will explain to you why it's best to learn characters early on, and there is a fun example of why it's crucial to use characters when we write Chinese.

Chinese phonetic structures are much simpler, compared with that of English. Many different Chinese characters can share the same sound, so the combinations of these sounds can be very confusing without the characters.

Lesson 3.3 Why Learning Characters
02:15

This is a short article explain to you why I use "words" and "characters" interchangeably in my videos. It's just a short article to help you get some clarification on this tiny issue.

Lesson 3.4: Words and Characters
01:30

This video is to help you prepare to write Chinese characters. I know it seems very complicated and difficult to write characters, but it's actually not.

The secret is to see people write them in action. Therefore, I will demonstrate how to write every character throughout this course.

I also emphasize the importance of the stroke order. Please make sure that you follow exactly how I write characters, and use the writing pad I design for you every time you practice. So, relax and have fun.

Lesson 3.5: How to Write Chinese Characters
01:37

This is the exciting part. In this video, I am going to teach you how to write this very important phrase, Ni Hao, meaning "Wishing you well" or hello in Chinese.

I will show you the basic stroke styles, stroke order principles, and what to watch out for when you write characters. It's all about hand-on experience, so get your pen and writing pad ready. Let's get to work.

Lesson 3.5 (continuing) Writing Ni Hao
11:22

Chinese phonetic structure is simpler. That means that every character is single-syllable, and most characters have their meanings on its own. That's why I previously explained to you that most Chinese characters are also words.

That the phonetic structure is simpler doesn't mean that it's easier. I am not saying that it's very hard. I just want you to have realistic expectation that there will be some sounds that are still going to be a challenge when you start.

In this video, I will show you what it means and sounds like that every character is single-syllable. In the musical term, Chinese is staccato (breaking up) rather than legato (flowing) as we often use to describe English.

Preview 03:22

In this phonics series, I am going to show you all the sounds there are in Chinese and their phonetic symbols. 

I'd like to first start off by showing you the sounds you are familiar with and sounds that are a little unfamiliar but you will still be able to pronounce easily.

The examples I use to teach these sounds will be those that are also very useful, so consider them the vocabulary that you need to learn and memorize.

I am not going to give you too many examples, just enough to cover the sounds we are dealing with at this stage, but I will start using these words in Chinese more frequently from now on.

Lesson 4.2 Consonants - b, p, m
28:58

In this phonics series, I am going to show you the sounds that might be a challenge for you, and their phonetic symbols, of course. 

After this video, you are expected to know all the phonetic symbols and their sounds. It is perfectly OK that you can print out the phonetic system sheet included in the following Lecture and carry it with you until you are completely familiar with the phonetic system.

As with the previous unit, in this video, I will also use real words to demonstrate these sounds, and these words are going to be very useful characters, so you are expected to learn and memorize them as part of your basic vocabulary. You will start to see their applications in the following lectures and units.

Lesson 4.3 Consonants - f-d-t-n
37:49

I will demonstrate how to say these consonants, and give you example words that have these sounds. Every word you learn in this video is very helpful, and you should remember their sounds, meanings and how to write them.

Lesson 4.4 Consonants -l-g-k-h
20:29

I will demonstrate how to say these consonants, and give you example words that have these sounds. Every word you learn in this video is very helpful, and you should remember their sounds, meanings and how to write them.

Lesson 4.5 Consonants - j-q-x
21:52

I will demonstrate how to say these consonants, and give you example words that have these sounds. Every word you learn in this video is very helpful, and you should remember their sounds, meanings and how to write them.

Lesson 4.6 Consonant -r-z-c-s
31:40

I will demonstrate how to say these consonants, and give you example words that have these sounds. Every word you learn in this video is very helpful, and you should remember their sounds, meanings and how to write them.

Lesson 4.7 Consonants -zh-ch-sh
20:04

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.8 Vowel - a
06:11

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.9 Vowel -o
06:18

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.10 Vowel - e
11:50

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.11 Vowel -ai
09:27

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.12 Vowel -ei
08:51

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.13 Vowel - an
05:50

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.14 Vowel - ang
05:24

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.15 Vowel - ao
06:29

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.16 Vowel - en
05:47

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.17 Vowel - eng
04:13

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.18 Vowel - er
07:05

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.19 Vowel - i
06:31

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.20 Vowel - ou
07:29

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.21 Vowel - u
03:03

In this video, I am going to show you how to say Chinese vowels, and the characters that help you remember those sounds and their applications.

Lesson 4.22 Vowel - v
08:33
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Level 2
5 Lectures 01:27:43

Learn how to greet people and say goodbye or end a conversation on a daily basis in a casual way.

Lesson 1: Greetings
20:26

This video covers the basic rules and understanding of Chinese names. Basically, in a full Chinese name, there's no middle name, surname always go first in both written and spoken form, and the rest is always the "first name", whether there is one character or two. Please watch the video to learn more.

Lesson 2: Chinese Names
10:13

It is very different to address someone in Chinese, and Mr and Mrs are not as commonly used as you might think. In Chinese, people use family relationships in their social life, and address everyone as if they were family. Learn how to do this and truly open doors for yourself when you enter this vast, wonderful world of Chinese.

Lesson 3: Family Relationships Socialized
14:57

There are two parts in this lesson because there are many details and information. We will learn some basic and important verbs. Through these examples, you will be able to see many real examples that can be created out of these few words.

Lesson 4: Important Verbs, Part I
25:19

There are two parts in this lesson because there are many details and information. We will learn some basic and important verbs. Through these examples, you will be able to see many real examples that can be created out of these few words.

Lesson 4: Important Verbs, Part II
16:48
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100 Basic Chinese Characters - Traditional Version
6 Lectures 21:56

Wo3 means I or me in Chinese.

#1-Wo-I, me
02:41

de means "of", and can change a noun into an adjective in Chinese. Please don't assume that they can be used the way you speak English. Watch the video to learn how to use and write this character properly.

#2-de-of
03:45

#3-shi-to be
04:47

#4-123
03:27

#5-bu-not
03:14

"Verb + le" indicates that an action is completed or makes it past tense, but that's just the basic explanation of le in Chinese. More details will be introduced in other videos.

#6-le-past tense
04:02
About the Instructor
Edward Wung
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42 Students
1 Course
Professional Linguist

I used to teach ESL for 10 years in Taiwan, I also went to graduate school of linguistics, focusing on language teaching and assessment at National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, which is one of the most prestigious universities in Taiwan. When I was in Taiwan, I also worked at that university as a full time professional translator, translating papers and articles written by many great academicians and scholars.

After I moved to the US, I have been a full time legal and court interpreter certified by the Supreme Court of Washington, which is the highest credential an interpreter can get in the US. I also work as a conference interpreter, and have been hired by mmany international corporations such as Starbucks, Microsoft, Amazon, Boeing, Hyatt, just to name a few.

I always have a passion for learning and teaching languages, and I have learned Japanese, German and French in the past. I believe that my professional training and experience as a full time translator and interpreter help me tremendously understand the challenges and obstacles an English native speaker will face when learning Chinese. I know the tricks and strategies to overcome those challenges, and I am ready to share them with all my students.