Presentation Bootcamp: Hands-On Audience Engagement Skills
5.0 (4 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
39 students enrolled
Wishlisted Wishlist

Please confirm that you want to add Presentation Bootcamp: Hands-On Audience Engagement Skills to your Wishlist.

Add to Wishlist

Presentation Bootcamp: Hands-On Audience Engagement Skills

Take charge of your presentation and control your audience
5.0 (4 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
39 students enrolled
Created by Jason Teteak
Last updated 1/2016
English
Curiosity Sale
Current price: $10 Original price: $200 Discount: 95% off
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 7 hours on-demand video
  • 25 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Keep the audience captivated
  • Ask the right questions
  • Address every learning style
  • Give targeted directionals
  • Make your presentation enjoyable
  • Make the audience feel safe and good
  • Make the audience laugh
  • Tailor your approach
  • Edit in advance for specific situations
  • Spot the signs your audience needs a spark
  • Be prepared to customize on the fly
  • Stay on schedule
  • Create a timetable
  • Manage audience question periods
  • Adjust as you go
  • Answer any question
  • Elicit questions from the audience
  • Minimize distractions
  • Stop interruptions
  • Handle negativity
  • Manage inattention
  • Close to applause
  • Show the presentation was worthwhile
  • Address any remaining questions
  • Tell the audience where to get more information
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Make sure to download the workbook before beginning each lecture. This will help you follow along, and you'll get more out of the course!
Description

This program dives deeply into the strategies, techniques and tools you need to be an effective presenter. It’s ultimately not about you: it’s about them—the people in your audience. Ruling the room means keeping them engaged and amused—laughing, if possible—and feeling that what you are presenting is specifically for them. It also means showing them you’re an expert presenter in keeping to your timetable, responding well to every question, defusing any distractions, and ending on such a high note that they applaud you.

Captain will teach you how to take charge of your presentation and control your audience. You will learn how to manage a presentation capable of actually changing people’s behavior.

Captain is one of the most powerful, complete, practical, and easy to learn presentation management programs anywhere. You’ll learn everything you need to be able to become one of the world’s best presenters, and you won’t leave until you have created and shown you know exactly how to do each of the following:

  • Engage your listeners so their minds never wander
  • Entertain and amuse your audience in a style that’s true to you
  • Make all listeners feel your message is meant just for them
  • Deliver a presentation that ends on time, every time
  • Elicit questions and provide answers even when you have none
  • Remain in charge no matter what’s happening
  • Move your audience to respond with enthusiasm
Who is the target audience?
  • Teaching professionals
  • Sales professionals
  • Human Resources professionals
  • Trainers
  • Managers
  • CEO's
  • Entrepreneurs
  • College students
  • Team leads
  • Project managers
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
25 Lectures
06:47:53
+
Introduction
1 Lecture 19:27
+
Keep the Audience Captivated
5 Lectures 01:13:25

One of the best ways to keep your audience engaged is to ask the right types of questions. To understand why, you first have to understand something about the human brain. It is made up of two parts that operate independently. Each controls a different mode of thinking. Adjectives that are used to describe the left brain include “logical,” “sequential,” and “rational.” Adjectives that are used to describe the right brain include “intuitive,” “holistic,” and “synthesizing.” The left side recalls the past; the right can envision the future. We know this because when the left or right side of a brain is damaged, the person afflicted loses the ability to perform the related functions.

Ask the Right Questions Part 1
18:40

One of the best ways to keep your audience engaged is to ask the right types of questions. To understand why, you first have to understand something about the human brain. It is made up of two parts that operate independently. Each controls a different mode of thinking. Adjectives that are used to describe the left brain include “logical,” “sequential,” and “rational.” Adjectives that are used to describe the right brain include “intuitive,” “holistic,” and “synthesizing.” The left side recalls the past; the right can envision the future. We know this because when the left or right side of a brain is damaged, the person afflicted loses the ability to perform the related functions.

Ask the Right Questions Part 2
14:59

If your audience is learning, you have their attention. To present your content so you get the attention of everyone in the audience, you have to make sure you address each of the four learning styles: Step Learners, Talk Learners, Research Learners, and Create Learners

Ask the Right Questions Wrap up and The Four Adult Learning Styles
15:09

You can and should target every learning style in every topic at some point. If you can present in a way that reaches all four styles simultaneously, you will be much more likely to keep your entire audience attentive. I have discovered one tool that will help you do just that. It is the variation of the circle of knowledge that I call agree and see if you’re right. It gives each type of learner the information in the way they want it, it’s incredibly powerful, and you can use it whenever your audience seems to be drifting.

The Agree and See if You're Right Technique
12:52

Yet another way to keep the attention of your audience is with a targeted directional. This is a short and sweet method that pays big dividends.

Whenever you want to get your audience’s attention, request that they do one of the following, depending, of course, on what items—handouts, monitors, slides, and so on—you are working with.

You want to sound confident, but not overbearing, so they’ll take action. You’ll have no trouble getting them to comply if you do it properly.

Give Targeted Directionals
11:45
+
Make Your Presentation Enjoyable
3 Lectures 53:41

People won’t laugh unless they’re feeling good. And they don’t feel good until they feel safe. This simple concept has enormous ramifications for presenters. When people feel good and feel safe, they are inclined to laugh easily.

Make the Audience Feel Safe
18:13

When I was asked to speak to college students about giving a presentation, they were especially interested in knowing how to make their presentations enjoyable so they could get people to laugh. That’s the goal of many presenters. I explained that people often make the mistake of trying to inject humor at the beginning of the presentation or when their presentation isn’t working. That is a futile, desperate act, since people laugh only when they’re feeling good, and before they feel good they have to feel safe.

As I presented, I gave them a behind-the-scenes insight that is always a hit when I speak about presenting. “You don’t feel safe with me yet,” I told them, “but you will. And none of you are feeling good yet, because it’s too early,” I added. “But in twenty minutes, many of you will be laughing.”

I could see the doubtful expressions on their faces. But within that time, they were feeling good, and eventually laughter ensued.

Make the Audience Feel Good
18:04

Everyone wants to know how to get a laugh out of an audience. Again, I want to make this point: People don’t laugh because something is funny. They laugh because they’re feeling good. And they don’t feel good until they feel safe. To make your audience laugh, you need to learn how to have fun with them in your own personal presentation style.

Make the Audience Laugh
17:24
+
Tailor Your Approach
4 Lectures 01:10:56

You may routinely give presentations on different topics to a particular kind of audience (a group of physicians, for example, or executives, or even a convocation of college students). You may also give presentations on the same topic to audiences of all different types. In either case, there will be times when you want to make the presentation even more effective by spending some advance time tailoring it for a specific audience.

Edit in Advance for Specific Audiences - Part 1
19:13

Consider the sensibilities or the group you're addressing, plan questions that are geared to that specific group, and match the mood of your audience.

Edit in Advance for Specific Audiences - Part 2
16:19

If audience members are unresponsive or negative, they’re likely not getting what they wanted for one of two reasons:

  • Your presentation isn’t meeting the audience’s expectations: It’s not giving them what they came for.
  • Your presentation isn’t meeting the audience’s needs: It isn’t giving them adequate and actionable solutions.

Even if you prepared using all the techniques I suggest, it is possible your audience will want to know even more than you had planned to cover.

Be Prepared to Customize on the Fly - Part 1
18:09

Customize your content wherever possible and give real-life uses they can relate to.

Be Prepared to Customize on the Fly - Part 2
17:15
+
Stay on Schedule
3 Lectures 58:34

When I give a presentation that’s scheduled to be an hour long, if I start at ten thirty, I end at eleven thirty. If I give a ten-minute presentation, I end exactly ten minutes later, and if I am supposed to deliver a four-hour presentation that starts at one o’clock, my audience can count on being able to walk out the door at five. A good presenter learns to do that.

Create a Timetable - Part 1
19:54

Document the timing - Once you have sped up or slowed down your presentation so it’s the correct length, practice that version three times. During the third run-through, make a note of how many minutes into the presentation you should be introducing each takeaway in order to end on schedule.

Manage Audience Question Periods - Faulty planning is the number one cause of pace problems. The best way to resolve these problems is by managing questions that come from the audience.

Create a Timetable - Part 2 and Manage the Audience Question Periods
19:45

Make sure your presentation is going according to your timetable, but never let the audience catch you checking the time. You don’t want to give the impression you aren’t interested in being responsive to them.

Adjust as you Go
18:55
+
Answer Any Question
4 Lectures 01:05:36

If you handle questions well, you meet your audience’s needs, which earns you credibility and respect; you keep the audience focused and engaged, and you look like a pro.

Elicit Questions from the Audience
18:55

This is the only occasion in your entire presentation when you make direct eye contact with a single individual for longer than a second or two. Stay focused as long as the person is speaking.

Remain in the sweet spot. Walking toward the speaker will be intimidating. Walking away will make you look as if you’re in retreat and signal you don’t know the answer.

Be a Responsive Listener
19:58

Answer In-Scope Questions Immediately - I explained in the last chapter that to manage your pace, you establish boundaries and tell your audience you will be answering only questions related to the topic during the question period but will postpone others until the end of the presentation.

If you expect to be bombarded by questions, you may want to establish these boundaries after the introduction and the circle of knowledge and before the first topic. (Make a note to yourself on the blueprint to do so.) Say, “I’m going to answer every one of your questions. Any question that is specifically about the topic I’m covering at the moment and relates to everyone, I’ll answer right away. I’ll answer any other questions right before the close of the presentation for you and others who might be interested.”

Cope Confidently when your Don't Know the Answer - In the unlikely event you’ve forgotten or don’t know the answer to an in-scope question, be cautious. Audiences have an uncanny knack for spotting a presenter’s weakness.

Answer In-Scope Questions and How to Respond When you Don't know the Answer
16:19

When you get a question that is not directly relevant to the material at hand, treat it like any question—whether or not you know the answer. First paraphrase it and thank the questioner. Then add, “Tell you what. Write that down, and let’s talk about that at [give a specific time, depending on when the break will come], you and I,” adding, “. . . and anyone else who might like to join us,” if you think others might be interested.

Postpone Out-of-Scope Questions Gracefully
10:24
+
Minimize Distractions
3 Lectures 40:03

People may stop the flow of your presentation by jumping in with questions and comments or trying to start conversations at inappropriate times. Their motives may not be negative. Some are what I have described as Talk Learners who are simply trying to absorb what you’re saying. They’re talking aloud while you deliver your message because they need to say it to get it.

When you ask questions throughout the presentation, these people often respond mentally and sometimes aloud as well, even without being called on (and even if your question is purely rhetorical). Including the circle of knowledge and agree and see if you’re right techniques, which give them a managed opportunity to talk, can be helpful. Still, the Talk Learners don’t pose major problems.

Stop Interruptions
17:32

Negative people tend to be Resenters, Naysayers, or Faultfinders.

It’s important to understand the motivation of such people who are at a presentation. They are often people who were required to attend, and they resent it. They come with an attitude that is not conducive to learning or to useful dialogue.

Rudolf Dreikurs would say their misbehavior is just the manifestation of desire for revenge, misdirected at the presenter rather than toward whoever required his or her presence.

Handle Negativity
15:38

Some Naysayers fall into the category of what Dreikurs called the discouraged people. I call them Active Passivists. “I can’t do that. I’ll never do that. I’ve tried and it’s failed and what you’re saying won’t work.” They want pity, and they want you to allow them to remain helpless by being inattentive during your presentation. Don’t commiserate with them. Your attitude has to be, “You’re going to get this, and I’ll help you.” So arrange small successes.

Manage Inattention
06:53
+
Close to Applause
2 Lectures 26:11

The classic rules for any sort of writing apply to presentations: Tell them what you’re going to tell them, tell them, and then tell them what you told them. At the very end of your presentation, remind your audience what they got and why they wanted it.

Show the Presentation was Worthwhile
09:18

Address remaining questions - When you’re finished summarizing the presentation, and while you’re still on the summary slide of all the takeaways, make your final question request.

Ask, “What questions do you have about [the title of your presentation]?” Richard asked his audience, “What questions do you have about increasing business with new low-risk loans?”

Part with warm words - When you thank your audience, give an actual, specific reason to thank them and you will seem even more sincere. Many presenters tend to thank the audience for their time, which suggests they might have been spending their time doing something more important. Instead, mention why you appreciate something they have done. For example, if they were very responsive—they were listening attentively and asking great questions—you might say, “Thank you for being such a warm audience.” If they gave you some great feedback you were looking for, say so: “Thank you for your feedback.”

Address Remaining Questions and Part with Warm Words
16:53
About the Instructor
Jason Teteak
4.8 Average rating
894 Reviews
9,968 Students
35 Courses
Author, Keynote & TEDx Speaker, CEO Rule the Room

Jason Teteak knows what it takes to Rule the Room. The master trainer and speaking presentation teacher has taught more than 50,000 people how to flawlessly command attention.

He’s won praise and a wide following for his original methods, his engaging style, and his knack for transferring communications skills via practical, simple, universal, and immediately actionable techniques.

Jason first made a reputation in the medical training industry, where he was known as “the presentation coach and trainer who trains the trainers.” Teteak’s attention to detail and precision in communicating definitive information was honed in serving this lifesaving industry.

In response to many requests, he began to offer personalized services and quickly developed a following as a private coach and a consultant whose clientele includes elite institutions, universities, and top corporate executives.

His new book, Rule the Room, was recently published in the summer of 2013. He has developed more than fifty presentation and communication training programs ranging in length from one hour to three days that serve as the basis for this unique, practical, and comprehensive course.