CAPM Exam Prep: Earn Your CAPM Certification
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CAPM Exam Prep: Earn Your CAPM Certification

Qualify for the CAPM Certification Exam - 25 Contact Hours from a PMI Registered Education Provider #4082
Best Seller
4.7 (1,133 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
4,649 students enrolled
Created by Joseph Phillips
Last updated 6/2017
English
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Includes:
  • 17.5 hours on-demand video
  • 30 Articles
  • 23 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion

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What Will I Learn?
  • You will get all the resources you need to pass the PMI CAPM certification exam.
  • You will earn 23 exam contact hours from a PMI Registered Education Provider.
  • You will be able to discuss the PMBOK Guide 5th edition with confidence
  • Explain the project management processes
  • Discuss the project management knowledge areas
  • Demonstrate the formulas, charts, and theories of project management
  • Calculate float for complex project network diagrams
  • Memorize the formulas for earned value management
  • Compare and contrast processes, knowledge areas, theories, and project management best practices
  • Reinforce your learning with our learning games!
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Students should already know the fundamentals of project management.
  • They should be dedicated to completing this course and have a deep desire to pass the CAPM exam.
Description

This course is taught by a PMI Registered Education Provider:

  • Instructing dotcom, LLC #4082
  • CAPM Exam Prep: Earn Your PMP Certification; Activity ID 1129CAPMEPS
  • 25 PDUs / 25 contact hours for the CAPM Exam Application

Not all courses on Udemy are part of the PMI REP program – this one is! CAPM Exam Prep has passed a quality audit and a business review, and it completely abides by the PMI REP program.

You need to pass the CAPM exam and you need quality training that'll help you in your role as a project manager. You also want to learn from an authority in project management, in an online environment with plenty of exercises, videos, and concise explanations. This course provides 25-contact hours of project management education and is taught by project management author and expert Joseph Phillips.

The 25 contact hours of project management education are earned by completing all of the course videos AND all the interactive video sessions in the course. The Learning Management System tracks your completion of the course; if you complete all the videos and interactive sessions, you can claim these educational hours for your CAPM exam application!

Our CAPM Exam Prep course provides complete coverage of the CAPM exam objectives for the PMBOK Guide, Fifth Edition. Start today, invest in your career, and begin working to clear your CAPM exam. Here's what's included in our CAPM Exam Prep Online Seminar:

►Updated for the 2016 CAPM Exam Objectives

►Complete coverage of the entire PMBOK® Guide, fifth edition

►Complete coverage of the entire CAPM exam objectives

►25 contact hours of project management education

►Certificate of Completion from Instructingdotcom at end of course

►100 CAPM practice final exam all exam objectives

►14 module exams (280 practice questions) covering every chapter of the PMBOK® Guide, fifth edition

►630-page PDF course workbook; entire course for note-taking and following along

►Math and concept worksheets for CAPM exam formulas

►Worksheet of the 47 processes and their ITTOs

►Flashcards of every term used in the PMBOK Guide, Fifth Edition, and this course

►CAPM Memory Sheets (PDF document) for printing, review, and on-the-go learning

►All exams are distributed in PDF format for easy printing and studying on-the-go

►Course discussions with the Instructor and peers

►30-day satisfaction guaranteed

What are the requirements?

  • Students should already know the fundamentals of project management
  • They should be dedicated to completing this course and have a deep desire to pass the CAPM exam

What am I going to get from this course?

  • You’ll get all the resources you need to pass the PMI CAPM certification exam
  • You will earn 25 exam contact hours from a PMI Registered Education Provider
  • You will be able to discuss the PMBOK Guide 5th edition with confidence
  • Explain the project management processes
  • Discuss the project management knowledge areas
  • Demonstrate the formulas, charts, and theories of project management
  • Calculate float for complex project network diagrams
  • Apply the formulas for earned value management
  • Compare and contrast processes, knowledge areas, theories, and project management best practices
  • Reinforce your learning with 13 bonus learning games!

What is the target audience?

  • Project managers who are preparing to PASS their PMI CAPMexamination
  • Project managers who need 25 contact hours to qualify for the CAPM examination
  • Project managers who want to pass their CAPM exam on the first try
  • This course is NOT for new project managers
  • This course is NOT for project managers seeking a project management guide
Who is the target audience?
  • Project managers who are preparing to PASS their PMI CAPM examination
  • Project managers who need 23 contact hours to qualify for the CAPM examination
  • Project managers who want to pass their CAPM exam on the first try
  • This course is NOT for new project managers.
Compare to Other CAPM Courses
Curriculum For This Course
152 Lectures
22:19:02
+
Earn Your CAPM Certification
5 Lectures 33:49

Let's begin by talking about this course as a whole. We'll discuss what you can expect in this course, how the class operates, and how to use this course to pass your CAPM.

You need to pass the CAPM® exam and you need quality training that'll help you in your role as a project manager. You also want to learn from an authority in project management, in an online environment with plenty of exercises, videos, and concise explanations. This course provides 35-contact hours of project management education and is taught by project management author and expert Joseph Phillips.

Preview 06:40

Not everyone can take the CAPM, only qualified applicants. Do you really qualify? This lecture will explain what it takes to qualify for the CAPM exam and how to apply.

  • Become a member of the Project Management Institute
  • CAPM® exam requirements
  • Document your application
Preview 10:20

I'm often asked how long should it take to pass the CAPM? Well, technically you only have four hours to pass the test, but you can prepare to pass the CAPM in four weeks. Four weeks?! Absolutely!

In this lecture I'll walk through a sample four-week strategy and a six-week strategy that you can adapt to pass the CAPM.

Activity: Create a Study Strategy
06:33

It's possible that your CAPM exam application will be audited. This means you will:

  •  Verify education experience
  • Photocopy of your degree or transcripts
  • Proof of course completion

 Verify project management experience

  • Your project experience becomes a PDF doc
  • Project supervisors will have to sign what you wrote
  • Envelope also signed across the back seal

 Mail all documents back to PMI Headquarters

Consider the CAPM Exam Application Audit
03:59

There is a difference between contact hours and Professional Development Units (PDUs). For the CAPM exam you want contact hours, not PDUs. In fact, CAPMs don't really have to worry about PDUs at all! In this lecture I'll compare and contrast the two and share some insight into when you'll need to earn PDUs.

Earn Contact Hours -Not PDUs
06:17
+
Review CAPM Exam Domains
4 Lectures 19:36

Here's something lots of people don't get: the CAPM exam has a list of tasks that you need to know how to perform. That's right - it's activity based, not only process-based. Yes, you can study from the PMBOK, but you had actually better know what tasks will happen in each of the five process groups.

This section explores these project management tasks that you can expect to be tested on.

Section Overview
03:41

Did you know this course has lots of cool resources? Ok, maybe they aren't cool, but this course includes:

  • Flashcards
  • Memory sheets
  • Participant workbook
  • Games
  • Worksheets
Download the Course Resources
07:38

The PMBOK Guide is not necessarily needed for this course, but it's a good idea. The PMBOK is:

  •  Generally recognized approach to project management
  •  Describes good practice for project management
  •  Common lexicon of project management terms
  •  Fundamental for PMI Exams:
    • CAPM
    • CAPM
    • PgMP
    • PMI-ACP
    • PMI-RMP
    • PMI-SP
Explore the PMBOK Guide, fifth edition
05:34

This section is all about the project management exam domains and the tasks the CAPM exam will test you on. In this section we discussed:

  • CAPM Exam Objectives
  • Project Integration Management
  • Project Scope Management
  • Project Time  Management
  • Project Cost Management
  • Project Quality Management
  • Project HR Management
  • Project Communications Management
  • Project Risk Management
  • Project Procurement Management
  • Project Stakeholder Management
Section Wrap
02:43
+
Define Project Foundations
7 Lectures 55:58

We all have to start somewhere and in the PMBOK it's all about defining the project and the project manager. In this section we'll explore:

  •  Temporary endeavors
  • Definite beginnings and endings
  • Creating a unique product, service, or result

 Projects can involve:

  • A single person
  • A single organizational unit
  • Multiple organizational units
Section Overview
05:02

In order to be a project manager you need to understand what a project is, what a project manager does, and how your personality can help you be a better project manager.

  • The difference between projects and operations
  • Management skills you’ll need
  • Using your personality
Define Project Basics
11:31

The organization structure can influence how the project manager manages all aspects of a project including:

  • Scope
  • Changes
  • Planning
  • Management
  • Success
  • Monitoring
Manage Projects and the Organization
17:47

You'll be tested on the role of the project manager, the stakeholder-project manager relationships, and how projects operate in organizations. Stakeholder management is a new knowledge area in the PMBOK Guide, fifth edition, so you can expect many questions on stakeholder management throughout the exam.

  • Working with senior project managers
  • Working with programs
  • Working with a project management office
  • Using enterprise environmental factors
Establish the Project Management Role and Responsibilities
06:28

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Basics Quiz
13:34

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Game Show for Project Fundamentals
00:09

We talked about projects, project management, organizational structures, and much more in this section. Some important topics we covered included:

  • Application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to meet the project requirements
  • 47 project management processes
  • Five project management process groups
    • Initiating
    • Planning
    • Executing
    • Monitoring and Controlling
    • Closing
Section Wrap
01:27
+
Describe Organizational Influences and the Project Life Cycle
7 Lectures 01:16:11

In this lecture you will explore:

  • Organizational structures and their influences
  • Organizational factors
  • Project life cycles
Section Overview
04:37

Stakeholders can influence how smoothly your project operates. Depending on the structure your project is operating in you will manage and influence the stakeholders differently. It's important for the CAPM exam to recognize the different organizational types and how the project manager may operate within each structure.

The CAPM exam will test your understanding of how project managers get things done in different types of organizations.

  • Influencing the organization
  • How organizations operate
  • Considering the organizational structure
Discuss Organizational Influences
15:54

Throughout the course you'll see organizational process assets and enterprise environmental factors. 

Organizational process assets:

  • Process and procedures (historical)
  • Corporate knowledge base (prepared)

Enterprise environmental factors

  • Organizational policies
  • Industry standards and regulations
  • Rules that the project manager must abide by
  • Processes that must be followed
  • Geographic distribution of facilities
  • Marketplace conditions
Describe Organizational Factors
19:42

Project stakeholders can be affected by the project life cycle. The project life cycle is unique to each project and is different from the project management life cycle. This lecture covers:

  • Project stakeholders influence
  • Project stakeholders and their contributions
  • Project life cycle characteristics
Review the Project Life Cycle
14:57

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Organizational Influence Quiz
16:03

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Organizational Influences and Project Life Cycle Pyramid Game
00:05

This was an important section covering lots of information for your CAPM exam:

  • Organizational influences and structures
  • Project governance
  • Project teams
  • Project life cycle
Section Wrap
04:53
+
Examine the 47 Project Management Processes You Must Know for CAPM Exam Success
11 Lectures 55:58

What is a process? A process is a set of interrelated actions and activities, that will create a pre-specified result. Quick facts:

  • Five groups of processes
  • 47 project management processes
  • Inputs, Tools and Techniques, Outputs


Section Overview
05:08

There are 47 project management processes that a project manager and the project team use to move a project along. The goal of these processes is to have a successful project, but a project’s success is based on more than just leveraging these processes. A successful project depends on five things:

  • Using the appropriate processes at the appropriate times
  • Following a defined project management approach for execution and project control
  • Developing and implementing a solid project management plan that addresses all areas of the project
  • Conforming the project and the project management approach to the customer requirements
  • Balancing the project time, cost, scope, quality, resources, and risks while meeting the project objectives


Explore Project Management Processes
11:14

The project manager is assigned during initiation, and the inputs from the original project initiator and/or the project sponsor are considered throughout the initiation processes. Project initiation is, of course, the first process that kicks off the project. This is exam-essential information includes:

  • Getting the project initiated
  • Developing the project charter
  • Identifying the project stakeholders


Walk-through Initiating Processes
02:22

Projects fail at the beginning and not the end. A project needs effective planning, or it will be doomed. The whole point of the planning process group is to develop the project management plan. The good news is that the entire project plan doesn’t have to happen in one session; in fact, planning is an iterative process, and the project manager and the project team return to the planning phase as needed to allow the project to move forward. Planning is key to project, and CAPM, success. This lecture introduces:

  • Developing the project management plan
  • Planning the project scope
  • Collecting project requirements
  • Defining the project scope
  • Creating the Work Breakdown Structure
  • Planning for schedule management
  • Defining the project activities
  • Sequencing the project activities
  • Estimating the activity resources
  • Estimating the activity duration
  • Developing the project schedule
  • Planning project cost management
  • Estimating the project costs
  • Planning the project budget
  • Planning for quality
  • Completing human resources planning
  • Planning for project communications
  • Planning the project risks
  • Identifying the project risks
  • Performing qualitative risk analysis
  • Performing quantitative risk analysis
  • Planning for risk responses
  • Planning procurement management
  • Planning stakeholder management


Analyze Planning Processes
02:59

The executing processes allow the project work to be performed. They include the execution of the project plan, the execution of vendor management, and the management of the project implementation. The project manager works closely with the project team in this process group to ensure that the work is being completed and that the work results are of quality. The project manager also works with vendors to ensure that their procured work is complete, of quality, and meets the obligations of the contracts. The executing processes are all about getting the project work done. This lecture covers:

  • Directing and managing project execution
  • Performing quality assurance
  • Acquiring the project team
  • Developing the project team
  • Managing the project team
  • Managing project communications
  • Conducting project procurements
  • Managing stakeholder engagement


Survey Executing Processes
02:08

The executing processes allow the project work to be performed. They include the execution of the project plan, the execution of vendor management, and the management of the project implementation. The project manager works closely with the project team in this process group to ensure that the work is being completed and that the work results are of quality. The project manager also works with vendors to ensure that their procured work is complete, of quality, and meets the obligations of the contracts. The executing processes are all about getting the project work done. This lecture covers:

  • Directing and managing project execution
  • Performing quality assurance
  • Acquiring the project team
  • Developing the project team
  • Managing the project team
  • Managing project communications
  • Conducting project procurements
  • Managing stakeholder engagement


Review Monitoring and Controlling Processes
02:49

This process group focuses on monitoring the project work for variances, changes, and discrepancies so that corrective action can be used to ensure that the project continues to move toward its successful completion. This means lots of measuring, inspecting, and communicating with the project team to ensure that the project plan is followed, variances to the plan are reported, and responses can be expedited. Closing process include:

  • Closing the project
  • Closing procurement


Complete Closing Processes
02:39

Project events determine which processes to utilize. You'll also create and use work performance data, work performance information, and work performance reports with the project processes.


Work With Project Processes
07:12

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Management Processes Quiz
14:53

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Card Stack Game for 47 Project Processes
00:05

For many CAPM candidates it's all about the processes. That's fine and dandy, but it's better to study according to the exam objectives and the distribution of questions among the knowledge areas. Spend some extra time really knowing and understanding the ITTOs of the processes.

Section Wrap
04:29
+
Master Project Integration Management for the CAPM Exam
11 Lectures 01:48:38

There's much to discuss in project integration management as this is the only project management knowledge area that has at least one process in every process group!

In this section you'll learn about:

  • Selecting projects for initiation
  • Launching new projects
  • Planning the project
  • Executing the project
  • Monitoring and Controlling the project
  • Closing the project

And much more...

Section Overview
03:49

Do you know why some projects are initiated and
some are not? This lecture will explore the main themes of project integration
management beginning with project selection and initiating.

Master Project Integration Management
16:29

Preparing to create the charter is often trickier than actually writing it. However, before the project management team can actually create a charter, there needs to be a project. This means the organization, the project steering committee, or the project portfolio management team needs to choose a project to initiate. There are reasons why some projects are selected and others are not. This lecture will explore:

  • Why projects are selected by organizations
  • Benefit measurement methods for project selection
  • Time value of money
  • Introduction to constrained optimization selection methods
Launch a New Project
10:03

It's imperative for the project manager to know why a project management plan, what's included in the project management plan, and how to create the plan. This lecture defines:

  • Examining the project management plan
  • Creating project management subsidiary plans
  • Working with a Configuration Management System
  • Comparing the project plan to the project documents


Plan the Project
11:41

The product of the project is created during these execution processes. The largest percentage of the project budget will be spent during project execution. The project manager and the project team must work together to orchestrate the timing and integration of all the project’s moving parts. A flaw in one area of the execution can have ramifications in cost and additional risk, and can cause additional flaws in other areas of the project. Once you have a plan you'll execute it. This lecture covers:

  • Executing the project work
  • Directing the project team
  • Examining the project deliverables
  • Applying project actions


Execute the Project Plans
07:56

As soon as a project begins, the project management monitoring and controlling processes also begin. These processes monitor all the other processes within the project to ensure they are being done according to plan, according to the performing organization’s practices, and to ensure that a limited number of defects enters the project.

  • Examining project performance
  • Tracking and monitoring project risks
  • Maintaining product information
  • Forecasting the project’s success
  • Monitoring approved changes


Monitor and Control the Project
13:41

Changes can affect all areas of the project. Consider a change in the project scope and how it could affect the project budget, schedule, quality, human resources, communications, risks, procurement and even other stakeholders.

  • Using change control tools
  • Examining integrated change control
  • Applying configuration management


Perform Integrated Change Control
19:04

Every project manager that I know loves to close a project. There’s something rewarding about completing a project and then transferring the deliverable to the customer or project user. I’ve also learned from participant feedback in my CAPM Exam Prep seminars that this topic is the category where exam candidates missed the most questions on their way to their CAPM certification. I believe it’s because folks have a tendency to study in the order of the process groups: initiation, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and then (finally) closing. I imagine they’re winded by the time their studying efforts get to closing. With that in mind, really home in on this closing discussion. I want you to pass your exam!

  • Performing administrative closure
  • Closing the project contracts
  • Closing the project
  • Update the organizational process assets


Close the Project
05:16

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Integration Management Quiz
15:33

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Project Integration Management Millionaire Challenge
00:05

Yes, this was a big section - one of the largest of the whole course! Project integration management is the only knowledge area which has a project process in every process group. We discussed:

  • Selecting projects for initiation
  • Launching new projects
  • Planning the project
  • Executing the project
  • Monitoring and Controlling the project
  • Closing the project
Section Wrap
05:00
+
Manage the Project Scope for Project (and CAPM!) Success
10 Lectures 01:25:10

This lecture is an overview of the entire project scope management knowledge area.

Participants will be able to define the project scope, its characteristics, and how to protect the scope from change. The project scope defines what the project is aiming to achieve.

Section Overview
03:28

One of the first things you’ll have to achieve in your role as the project manager of a new project is to define the project’s scope management plan. Now, your organization may rely on organizational process assets in the form of a template for all projects, but it’s possible that you’ll be creating this scope management plan from scratch. In this section, you’ll learn both approaches that you can apply to your projects and your PMI exam. This lecture includes:

  • Relying on project information
  • Using templates and forms
  • Creating the Project Scope Management Plan
  • Performing product analysis
  • Using alternative identification
  • Interviewing experts and stakeholders


Plan Project Scope Management
06:16

The second plan that comes out of this process is the requirements management plan. While similar in nature, this plan explains how the project will collect, analyze, record, and manage the requirements throughout the project. Like the scope management plan, this plan doesn’t list the actual requirements, but sets the rules for how the project manager, team, and stakeholders will interact with the project’s requirements. This plan is also a subsidiary plan for the overall project management plan. The project requirements are defined through many tools and techniques to help document the requirements and to create a requirements traceability matrix. This lecture details:

  • Working with stakeholders to define requirements
  • Requirement gathering techniques
  • Documenting and publishing requirements
  • Creating a requirements traceability matrix


Collect Project Requirements
20:10

The project scope statement is one of the most important documents in the project. This lecture covers:

  • Detailing the project objectives
  • Describing the product scope
  • Defining the project requirements
  • Establishing the project boundaries
  • Defining the project acceptance criteria
  • Identifying the project constraints
  • Listing the project assumptions
  • Defining the initial project organization
  • Defining the initial project risks
  • Determining the schedule milestones
  • Setting fund limitations
  • Estimating the project costs
  • Determining the project configuration management requirements
  • Identifying project specification documents
  • Documenting the project approval requirements


Define the Project Scope
12:33

A key concept for your CAPM exam, and often your projects, is the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). The WBS is all about the project deliverables. It’s a breakdown of the project scope into hierarchical deliverables. The WBS takes the project scope and breaks it down into smaller, manageable chunks of deliverables. Each layer of the WBS breaks down the layer above it into smaller deliverables, until it arrives at the smallest item in the WBS, the work package. This lecture details:

  • Defining the WBS
  • Using a WBS template
  • Decomposing the project scope
  • Creating the WBS
  • Creating the WBS dictionary
  • Defining the scope baseline


Create the Work Breakdown Structure
11:07

Scope validation is the process of the project customer accepting the project deliverables. It happens either at the end of each project phase or as major deliverables are created. Scope validation ensures that the deliverables the project creates are in alignment with the project scope. It is concerned with the acceptance of the work. A related activity, quality control (QC), is concerned with the correctness of the work. Scope validation and QC can happen in tandem because the quality of the work contributes to scope validation. Poor quality will typically result in scope validation failure. How do you know your scope and deliverables are valid? This lecture will help you to understand:

  • Defining scope validation
  • Performing scope validation
  • Group-decision making techniques
  • Gaining project acceptance


Validate Project Scope
05:02

Scope control is about protecting the project scope from change and, when change does happen, managing those changes. Ideally, all requested changes follow the scope change control system, which means that change requests must be documented. Those changes that sneak into the project scope are lumped into that project poison category of scope creep. Scope creep is, of course, bad, bad news. You must protect the project scope from changes and this lecture will help. You'll learn:

  • Establishing a change control system
  • Studying variances
  • Replanning the project work
  • Revisiting the configuration management system


Control the Project Scope
07:02

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Scope Management Quiz
14:02

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Mad Scientist or Genius? Game for Project Scope Management
00:05

Project scope management is a paramount portion of the CAPM exam. As much of the project hinges on the project scope, it's no wonder the CAPM exam will to. In this section we discussed:

  • Collecting requirements
  • Defining the project scope
  • Planning the project scope
  • Create the WBS
  • Validating scope
  • Controlling scope


Section Wrap
05:25
+
Plan and Control Project Time Management
14 Lectures 02:26:17

Project time management is an important concept for the CAPM exam. Participants will be able to define schedule management, create a project schedule, and manually calculate float. Time management is crucial to exam and project success.

This is the section you're after if you're looking for how to calculate float!

Section Overview
05:49

The project management planning processes are iterative, as you know, and will happen over and over throughout the project. You and the project team—and even some key stakeholders—will work together to define the project’s schedule management plan. This will happen early in the project’s planning processes, but chances are good you’ll need to return to schedule management planning to adjust, replan, or focus on the schedule you’ve created for the project. Schedules are created and designed throughout the project. This lecture will help you to understand these concepts:

  • Examining policies and procedures
  • Working with a deadline
  • Creating the schedule based on scope


Plan Schedule Management
05:18

When a project is first initiated, project managers often focus immediately on the labor and activities that will be required to complete the project work. But that focus ignores the scope. In Chapter 5, I discussed the project scope and the work breakdown structure (WBS) as prerequisites to defining the project activities. Before the work actually begins you'll need to work with the project team to define the activities to schedule. This lecture covers:

  • Examining the inputs to activity definition
  • Decomposing the project work
  • Relying on project templates
  • Using rolling wave planning
  • Planning for more work
  • Examining the project activities and their attributes


Define the Project Activities
19:09

Now that the activity list has been created, the activities must be arranged in a logical sequence. This process calls on the project manager and the project team to identify the logical relationships between activities, as well as the preferred relationship between those activities. Once you have the activities defined you'll need to put them in the correct order. That's what this module is all about:

  • Defining the activity relationships
  • Determining the network structure to use
  • Establishing activity dependencies
  • Applying leads and lags


Sequence the Project Activities
15:57

Resources include materials, equipment, and people. After the project manager and the project team have worked together to determine the sequence of the activities, they now have to determine which resources are needed for each activity, as well as how much of each resource. As you can guess, resource estimating goes hand in hand with cost estimating. This lecture will define:

  • Considering the project work
  • Examining the labor availability
  • Estimating the resource need
  • Creating a resource calendar


Estimate the Activity Resources
12:53

First, you identify the activities, sequence the activities, define the resources, and then estimate durations. These processes are needed to complete the project schedule and the project duration estimate. These four processes are iterated as more information becomes available. If the proposed schedule is acceptable, the project can move forward. If the proposed schedule takes too long, the scheduler can use a few strategies to compress the project. We’ll discuss the art of scheduling in a few moments.

Activity duration estimates, like the activity list and the WBS, don’t come from the project manager—they come from the people completing the work. The estimates may also undergo progressive elaboration. In this section, we’ll examine the approach to completing activity duration estimates, the basis of these estimates, and allow for activity list updates. In order to predict when the project will end you'll need to examine project activity duration. That's what this module covers:

  • Estimating the project duration
  • Using analogous estimates
  • Using parametric estimates
  • Using three-point estimates
  • Creating a management reserve


Estimate the Activity Durations
12:40

The project manager, the project team, and possibly even the key stakeholders, will examine the inputs previously described and apply the techniques discussed in this section to create a feasible schedule for the project. The point of the project schedule is to complete the project scope in the shortest possible time without incurring exceptional costs, risks, or a loss of quality.

Creating the project schedule is part of the planning process group. It is calendar-based and relies on both the project network diagram and the accuracy of time estimates. When the project manager creates the project schedule, she’ll also reference the risk register. The identified risks and their associated responses can affect the sequence of the project work and when the project work can take place. In addition, if a risk comes to fruition, the risk event may affect the scheduling of the resources and the project completion date. Do you know how to calculate float? If not, this is the module you'll want to spend some time in. This module includes:

  • Examining the project network
  • Finding the critical path and float
  • Compressing the project schedule
  • Simulating the project work
  • Leveling the project resources
  • Using the critical chain methodology
  • Applying calendars and updating the project schedule


Develop the Project Schedule
13:29

Float, or slack, is the amount of time an activity can be delayed without postponing the project’s completion. Technically, there are three different types of float:

  • Free float: This is the total time a single activity can be delayed without affecting the early start of any successor activities.
  • Total float: This is the total time an activity can be delayed without affecting project completion.
  • Project float: This is the total time the project can be delayed without passing the customer-expected completion date. 

There are a couple of different approaches to calculating float. I’m sharing the approach that I learned and that I think is the best approach. You may have learned a different method that you prefer. You won’t hurt my feelings if you use your method to get the same result as my method. What’s most important is that you understand the concepts of forward and backward passes, and that you can find the critical path and float in a simple network diagram.

Most project management software will automatically calculate float. On the CAPM exam, however, candidates will be expected to calculate float manually. Don’t worry—it’s not too tough.

Find Float in a Project Network Diagram
18:16

In this exercise you will work through the process of finding float for a project. You can print out the Float Worksheet resource or, to better emulate the actual CAPM exam, draw the project network diagram on paper.

Let's try out this float exercise now!

Activity: Finding Float
12:35

Like most things in a project, the project manager will need to work to control the schedule from slipping off its baseline. A schedule control system is a formal approach to managing changes to the project schedule. It considers the conditions, reasons, requests, costs, and risks of making changes. It includes methods of tracking changes, approval levels based on thresholds, and the documentation of approved or declined changes. The schedule control system process is part of integrated change management. This lecture will help you to understand:

  • Examining the project schedule characteristics
  • Examining the schedule baseline
  • Reporting the project progress
  • Using a schedule change control system
  • Examining schedule variances
  • Using schedule comparison bar charts


Consider Resource Availability for Scheduling
07:53

A tiny section in the PMBOK Guide, fifth edition, is the critical chain method of project network diagrams. This approach, while similar to the critical path method, uses feeding buffers rather than float. In this short video we'll explore what you need to know about the critical chain method for your CAPM exam.

Explore the Critical Chain Method of Project Network Diagrams
01:33

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Time Management Quiz
13:59

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Gameshow! Project Time Learning Game
00:05

Project time management is an important knowledge area. In this section we discussed:

  • Planning schedule management
  • Defining the project activities
  • Estimating activity resources
  • Developing the project schedule
  • Float and the critical path
  • Controlling the schedule


Section Wrap
06:41
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Estimate, Budget, and Control Project Costs
9 Lectures 01:36:14

Stakeholders, especially stakeholders that are paying for the project, will want to know how much the project will cost as soon as possible. This section discusses how to:

  • Plan project costs
  • Estimate project costs
  • Create the project budget
  • Control project costs
  • Earned value management


Section Overview
04:41

You need a plan just for project costs. You need a plan that will help you define what policies you and the project team have to adhere to in regard to costs, a plan that documents how you get to spend project money, and a plan for how cost management will happen throughout your entire project. Well, you’re in luck! This plan, a subsidiary plan of the project management plan, is the project cost management plan. You'll need to understand all about the project's cost management plan for your CAPM exam. This lecture covers:

  • Creating the cost management plan
  • Adhering to organizational policies and procedures
  • Relying on organizational process assets and enterprise environmental factors


Plan Project Cost Management
07:26

Assuming that the project manager and the project team are working together to create the cost estimates, there are many inputs to the cost-estimating process. For your PMI exam, it would behoove you to be familiar with these inputs because these are often the supporting details for the cost estimate the project management team creates. Cost estimating uses several tools and techniques. You'll learn in this module:

  • Following the organizational process assets
  • Building a cost management plan
  • Creating an analogous estimate
  • Determining resource cost rates
  • Create a bottom-up estimate
  • Building a parametric estimate
  • Using the PMIS
  • Analyzing vendor bids
  • Considering the contingency reserve
  • Presenting the cost estimate


Estimate Project Costs
19:49

Now that the project estimate has been created, it’s time to create the official cost budget. Cost budgeting is really cost aggregation, which means the project manager will be assigning specific dollar amounts for each of the scheduled activities or, more likely, for each of the work packages in the WBS. The aggregation of the work package cost equates to the summary budget for the entire project. There is a difference between what was estimated and what's actually being spent on the project. This lecture defines:

  • Aggregating the project costs
  • Completing project cost reconciliation
  • Creating the project cost baseline
  • Examining the project cash flow


Create the Project Budget
13:22

Once a project has been funded, it’s up to the project manager and the project team to work effectively and efficiently to control costs. This means doing the work right the first time. It also means, and this is tricky, avoiding scope creep and undocumented changes, as well as getting rid of any non-value-added activities. Basically, if the project team is adding components or features that aren’t called for in the project, they’re wasting time and money.

Cost control focuses on controlling the ability of costs to change and on how the project management team may allow or prevent cost changes from happening. When a change does occur, the project manager must document the change and the reason why it occurred and, if necessary, create a variance report. Cost control is concerned with understanding why the cost variances, both good and bad, have occurred. The “why” behind the variances allows the project manager to make appropriate decisions on future project actions. Managing cost control is an ongoing activity within a project. This lecture defines cost control, including earned value management. You'll learn:

  • Working with a cost change control system
  • Measuring project performance
  • Earned Value Management fundamentals
  • Finding project variances
  • Calculating the project performance
  • Forecasting the project performance
  • Earned Value Management formula review


Control Project Costs
20:18

You will likely have a few questions on earned value management on your CAPM examination. 

This exercise will challenge you to calculate all of the earned value management formulas. Try this activity out first and then make up some sample scenarios to experiment with. Once you do these formulas a few times - okay, several times, you'll begin to memorize the actions. 

Knowing the formulas means correct answers on your exam!

Activity: Earned Value Management
12:05

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Cost Management Quiz
13:34

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Climb the Project Cost Management Pyramid
00:04

You'll have plenty questions on project cost management and the topics discussed in this section on your CAPM exam. In this section, we discussed:

  • Plan project costs
  • Estimate project costs
  • Create the project budget
  • Control project costs
  • Earned value management


Section Wrap
04:55
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Plan, Assure, and Control Project Quality Management for the CAPM
9 Lectures 01:09:49

Learners will be able to compare and contrast quality planning, quality assurance, and quality control. This module includes all needed quality charts and theories. Dig into this section and really know what quality is and how to achieve it in your projects.

Section Overview
03:50

Quality planning is the process of first determining which quality standards are relevant to your project and then finding the best methods of adhering to those quality standards. This is a great example of project integration management, which was referred to earlier. Quality planning is core to the planning process group because each knowledge area has relevant standards that affect quality, and quality planning is integrated into each planning process. Quality can be an esoteric topic, but this lecture will help. You'll learn:

  • Defining project quality
  • Completing a cost-benefits analysis
  • Benchmarking the project
  • Performing a design of experiments
  • Determining the cost of quality
  • Creating the Quality Management Plan
  • Establishing quality metrics
  • Using quality checklists
  • Creating a Process Improvement Plan
  • Establishing a quality baseline


Plan Project Quality Management
18:34

Know these seven basic quality tools for your CAPM exam:

  • Cause and effect diagrams
  • Flowcharts
  • Check sheets
  • Pareto Diagrams
  • Histograms
  • Control charts
  • Scatter diagrams


Using Seven Basic Quality Tools
13:14

Know these seven basic quality tools for your CAPM exam:

  • Cause and effect diagrams
  • Flowcharts
  • Check sheets
  • Pareto Diagrams
  • Histograms
  • Control charts
  • Scatter diagrams


Completing Quality Management Planning
05:36

Quality assurance (QA) is the sum of the creation and implementation of the plans by the project manager, the project team, and management to ensure that the project meets the demands of quality. QA is not something that is done only at the end of the project, but is done before and during the project as well. Quality management is prevention-driven; you want to do the work correctly the first time. Quality Assurance is a prevention-driven activity. This lecture will explore that concept through these topics:

  • Defining QA
  • Performing a quality audit
  • Examining the project processes
  • Recommending corrective actions


Perform Quality Assurance
04:55

This is the section of the project where the project manager and the project team have control and influence. Quality assurance (QA), for the most part, is specific to your organization, and the project manager doesn’t have much control over the QA processes—he just has to do them. Quality control (QC), on the other hand, is specific to the project manager, so the project manager has lots of activities. Quality control is an inspection-driven activity and you'll learn that concept through this lecture.

  • Performing quality control measurements
  • Creating a cause and effect diagram
  • Creating a control chart
  • Completing project flowcharting
  • Creating a histogram
  • Examining a Pareto chart
  • Creating a run chart
  • Examining a scatter diagram
  • Completing a statistical sampling
  • Inspecting the project work
  • Review defect repair
  • Quality control and lessons learned


Implement Project Quality Control
04:37

This is a quiz on your project management experience and what you've learned so far in the course. Quizzes are part of the learning process!

Activity: Project Quality Management Quiz
15:06

I've created a learning game for you based on the contents of this section.

This is a fun way to keep learning while completing an activity. You can play this game over and over until you score it perfectly - it should you about 30 minutes to complete.

Activity: Science! Learning Game for Project Quality Management
00:05

There are just three quality management processes discussed in this section

  • Plan quality management
  • Perform quality assurance
  • Perform quality control
    These three processes, however, are big portions of your CAPM exam! Know these processes and the contents of this section.


Section Wrap
03:52
8 More Sections
About the Instructor
Joseph Phillips
4.6 Average rating
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61,287 Students
25 Courses
PMP, PMI-ACP, Project+, ITIL, Certified Technical Trainer

Joseph Phillips has more than 15 years’ experience as a project management consultant, educator, technology consultant, business owner, and technical writer. He has consulted as a project manager for a range of businesses, including startups, hospitals, architectural firms, and manufacturers.  Joseph is passionate about helping students pass the PMP certification exam.  He has created and led both in-person and web-based seminars on project management, PMP certification, IT project management, program management, writing, business analysis, technical writing, and related topics.  Joseph has written, co-authored, or served as technical editor to more than 35 books on technology, careers, project management, and goal setting for MacMillan, McGraw-Hill, Pearson Education, and AMA Press.

Certifications:

Project Management Professional (PMP)

PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)

CompTIA Project+ Professional

CompTIA Certified Technical Trainer+

Certified ITIL Foundations Professional

Author of:

PMP Project Management Professional Study Guide, McGraw-Hill

CAPM/PMP All-in-One Exam Guide, McGraw-Hill

PMP Project Management Lab Book, McGraw-Hill

The Certified Technical Trainer All-in-One Exam Guide, McGraw-Hill

IT Project Management: On Track from Start to Finish, McGraw-Hill

Project Management for Small Business, American Management Association 

Software Project Management for Dummies, For Dummies Publisher

The Lifelong Project, Amazon CreateSpace

Vampire ManagementWhy Your Job Sucks, Amazon CreateSpace