Boxing Coach Course | Basics
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Boxing Coach Course | Basics

Learn the basics of the sport of boxing so you can go on to teach
4.7 (6 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
30 students enrolled
Created by Glenn Smith
Last updated 9/2016
English
Curiosity Sale
Current price: $10 Original price: $20 Discount: 50% off
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 32 mins on-demand video
  • 1 Supplemental Resource
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Teach Boxing to a fundamental level.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Students should have access to a gym and ideally a full length mirror so that they can practice the learning materials. A Pair of boxing gloves and boxing pads will also be needed upon completion if the individual wishes to go on and teach students.
Description

Glenn Smith, professional Boxing Coach has over 30 years experience and has recently designed a set of Boxing Coach Courses that have been endorsed and approved by Skills Active. These courses take the student through the different levels of boxing stages. Now through Udemy, we have been able to adapt these courses and offer them to online students all over the globe. 

This is the perfect course for a Personal Trainer who’s looking to be able to add something different to each session. After learning the basics of boxing, your are all set to provide your student with hours of fresh new learning material which will help keep it interesting while also working up a sweat. 

Even if your passionate about the sport and you’d like the information to bring your own boxing ability on, this course will certainly provide that.

The Boxing Coach Course is perfect for anyone wanting to learn the basics in the current modern Boxing sport. During the course you will learn through bite-sized clips all about the correct stance, foot work and punching. We also talk you through basic skipping and our instruction is in great depth so that you can master the content and go on to teach boxing confidently. 

Course completion time is just over an hour, however the video clips are all bite-size so the learner can pick and chose which content to learn or can complete in their own time. The Course is instructed through video along with in-depth text breakdown that covers each punch.  


Who is the target audience?
  • The Boxing Coach Course is ideal for Personal Trainers within the fitness industry who want to add to their CV. It's also perfect for an individual looking to gain an insight into the technical side of boxing for their own training.
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Curriculum For This Course
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Boxing Basics
31 Lectures 31:42

Welcome to the Boxing Coach Course. Here you will learn the basics of boxing. We will be stripping it all back & starting from the very beginning. Starting with the Stance, then through to the basic punches, onto the footwork and we also touch on basic skipping technique and finish with the more complicated punches. 

Preview 00:41

The instructor stands in front of the class and asks the clients to stand in front of him in one line making sure they can all see you clearly, ask them to take their right foot straight back (if they are orthodox, and left foot if they are southpaw) about 45cm (18inches). 

Then take the same foot out away from the other foot about 30cm(12inches), These distances depend on the height of your clients, but we are looking for good balance and strength so your students may need to adjust their feet slightly.  

Once everyone is comfortable, ask your students to point their leading foot. If we compare the feet to the face of a clock; the front foot should be facing 12 o clock and the back foot should be facing 2 o clock, if they are orthodox. If they are southpaw then the same position applies but with the reversed feet positions. 

In the stance, when standing still, the leading foot should be resting flat. Whereas the back foot heel should be approx 5cm(2inches) off the floor. Then turn the body so the left shoulder is directly in line with your leading foot. Both sides of your body should now be in alignment with your foot, knee, hip and shoulder. 

Now with both hands, lift them up and gently hold your earlobes with your thumb and index finger then slowly let go and lower the hands. Now turn the hands into a loosely held fist to the level of your jaw line. Your leading hand sits 10cm(4inches) in front of the face and the back hand sits directly alongside the face. The palms of both hands face one another. Once the hands are in the correct position, the forearms should be vertically straight with the elbow sitting at the same level as the bottom rib. 

The head sits comfortably straight but the chin should be dipped slightly. 

Once the stance has been implemented successfully, we go into learning the art of punching. 

Preview 00:54

The jab is used more than any other punch in boxing. It is used as a range finder, a point scorer, to keep your opponents at bay or to close the distance.

The jab is thrown by the front hand. It travels in a straight line and stays like this. As the arm is about to lock, the leading shoulder lifts (naturally, not forced). The elbow then turns to the side and the fist turns so the palm of the hand is facing the floor. 

Then we bring the arm back into its original position. The hand, elbow and shoulder all turn at the same time; the hand turns to the side, the elbow drops and points to the floor and the shoulder drops back into the stance position. 

Throwing the back hand requires the same body dynamics as the leading hand. Only this time, as soon as the hand leaves its position, the back foot pivots (turns) this will also naturally turn the back hip. Once the arm is in the extended position, the back foot should be turned so it is facing forward and is facing in the same direction as the extended arm. The hips should now be parallel to one another, then the reverse to bring the hand back. 

Preview 01:07

From the stance position, all at the same time, we throw our back hand forward, keeping the elbow pointing towards the floor. We start rotating our back foot, so the back foot starts to face forward and turn our rear hip forward. 

Then, once the arm is almost locked out, the elbow starts to turn and face outwards, and the hand turns, so the palm of the hand turns towards the floor and the back foot turns so it faces forward. 

Once the arm is fully locked, we reverse the above, bringing the arm and foot back into the stance position. 

Preview 01:00

This combination is putting the jab and the straight backhand together. The same techniques as above will apply but this time once the jab has been thrown and is at full extension, as soon as the leading hand starts to come back, the back hand will start to travel forward. At this midway point, both hands should be in line with one another. The leading hand returns to its stance position and the back hand carries on to full extension, including the rotation of the hip and foot. 

Preview 01:18

Once we are comfortable in our stance, we are going to move forward. We move the leading foot approx 17cm (7’). We go from a flat foot to landing on the ball of your foot. The foot does not touch the floor while its moving, it just hovers above it. 

When you are mobile, your leading foot should keep all of its weight on the ball of your foot. The heel should stay approx 5cm (2’) off the floor. 

Once the leading foot lands on the floor, the back foot then glides on the ball of the feet, across the floor, moving the same distance as the front foot. 

The back foot should stay at the two o clock foot position. Once the foot is in this position, the procedure should start again with the front foot moving. Whilst on the move, keep the body in the correct stance position. 

Then repeat the procedure moving forwards 5 to 6 times. 

Now we are going to move backwards, so it’s the reverse action; 

The back foot moves backwards approx 17cm (7’), taking the foot slightly off the floor, once on the floor, the front foot then glides and makes the same distance. Then move back a further 5 steps. 

Preview 01:32

Adding to footwork; Here I teach you some tips for moving left to right. 

Preview 01:09

Once you are comfortable in your stance, we are going to defend against an oncoming punch. 

Keeping our upper body in the same position, we slowly start to straighten the back leg and at the same time the front leg starts to bend with the front knee travelling over the front foot, approx 13cm (5’) with the back leg straightening. Then reverse the action to get back into your stance.  

Preview 01:09

From our stance we throw a jab as explained earlier, after the jab has been thrown to full extension, then the instant you start to bring the arm back, you start slipping forward and on completion of the slip the leading hand should be back on the jaw position.

Preview 00:53

This time, from our stance as we throw the jab we start to slip to the side at exactly the same time. Once the jab has been fully extended, the slip will be fully executed. 

Preview 00:54

Going back to the jab and forward slip where the jabbing hand returns to the face once the slip is completed. Now we are going to throw the jab from the slip position. As we are in the slip, the jab will be thrown upwards and diagonally forward. At the same time we will also pivot (turn) the feet; the front foot will go from a flat foot pointing towards 12 o clock to turning to 3 o clock, with the heel raised. The back foot will go from raised heel and pointing to 2 o clock, to a flat foot  and point towards 3 o clock.

When the jab is being thrown, the front leg will start to extend to normal stance position when the jabbing arm is fully extended. The front leg will be extended to normal stance position.  

Preview 01:01

When we have completed the jab and slip backwards as before, we are going to throw the straight back hand diagonally forward and at the same time extending the back knee and pivoting the back foot from 2 o clock to 12 o clock on the arm reaching full extension (southpaw the back foot goes from 10 o clock to 1 o clock).   

Preview 01:05

Even though we are going to bob & weave, we always start by teaching the slip. So we are going to slip to your right (left if southpaw), on completion of the slip you push from your back leg, then drop your body weight even lower by pushing your body weight  towards the front leg. Once the upper body has reached the centre point between both legs, we start to ascend with our weight being pushed onto our front leg. 

Our back leg keeps pushing until it is almost locked at the knee. In this position, our front leg is bent forward with the knee over our front foot. Keeping our upper body in the stance position, then we once again drop back down, this time using the front leg to push our body weight towards your back leg, and once again, once we reach centre point, we start to ascend. The front leg almost locks at the knee, whilst the back knee is pushed over the back front and throughout the movement, the front foot stays flat and the heel of the back foot stays off the floor. Keeping in our stance the whole time. 

Preview 01:19

Same as above, we start with slipping backwards, taking the upper body weight over our back leg, bending at the rear knee, then we begin to weave. This time, as we pass midway and as soon as we start to ascend forward we start to throw the jab and begin to pivot the front foot and back foot. We keep ascending upwards until the jab is fully extended. The back leg is extended. The front leg is bent at the knee with the knee over the front foot, and both feet are in the pivot position, with the heel of the front foot raised and the back foot flat. 

Preview 00:58

Same as above, but now the jab has landed, we start to bring the arm back. And at the same time we start dropping our weight onto our front leg and our feet begin to pivot back to their original position, then as we meet our midway point with the weave, our upper body weight, your front foot should be flat. Our back heel is raised, then as we start to push our body weight onto our back leg, we start to ascend, as we do we start to throw the back hand diagonally forwards, pivoting the back foot towards 1’ o clock (11’ o clock 

if southpaw). Once the arm is fully extended the front leg should be slightly bent at the knee, and the back leg is facing forward and the back foot facing 12’ o clock with the heel raised. 

Preview 00:52

This is a simple and effective defence to the jab. The movement is the same wherever you use your left or right hand. The backhand parry will be used against an opponent who has the same stance as yourself and the front hand parry against the opposite stance.

Techniques of the parry 

Whilst in your stance position as an orthodox fighter against another orthodox fighter, when your opponent throws a jab towards your face at the same time your backhand leaves its position and your wrists and hands start to rotate forward. The hand travels approx 15cm (6’) in front of your face, with the wrist and hand turned fully forwards, and it will then block your opponents jab from scoring. 

Once you have blocked your opponents jab start to rotate your forearm and your wrist at the same time whilst bringing your hand back to the stance position. 

Preview 01:12

From our stance position, we throw a jab. Once the jabbing arm is fully extended we start to bring the hand back to the stance position and at exactly the same time we start to parry with our back hand. When the jabbing hand is fully back, our parry is at the blocking position, then we reverse the above, we jab once again and the same time we bring our parrying hand back to its stance position. Then, once our jabbing arm has hit it’s target we bring it back to the stance position. 

Preview 00:31

From our stance position, we throw a jab and at the same time we start to parry. Once the jab is fully extended, our parry is in the block position, then on completion we bring the jab & parry back at the same time to the stance position. 

Preview 00:43

Like above, from our stance, we throw a jab and parry. Then once we have parried, leaving our back hand in that position, we start to throw our back hand, in a clenched position towards our target, remembering to turn our hip and foot to the pivot position.

Preview 00:45

From our stance position, we step forward with our leading foot approx 61cm (24inches) landing on the ball of our foot. And at exactly the same time we start to step. We throw a jab towards the mid-section of our opponent, when this foot lands on the floor. Our jabbing hand hits the body, our leading foot is now flat. 

Also at the same time, to allow for the step, our back leg bends at the knee and we push off of our back foot. We slightly increase the gap of our heel from the floor 3cm (1inch) to 10cm (4inch) whist our knee on our rear leg drops to approx 18cm(7') from the floor.

Then on completion of our jab landing, we push on the ball of our leading foot and we start to bring our leading foot, leg, and arm back to the stance position all at the same time whilst bringing our back leg to an upright position and bringing our back heel to the stance position.

Preview 01:12

From your stance position, we push from our back foot and make a step with our front foot approx 61cm(24'), our leading foot hovers above the floor and lands on the ball

of our foot. then placing the front foot flat and at exactly the same time we start to step. we throw a jab towards the mid-section of our opponent when we put the leading foot 

flat on the floor. Our jabbing hand hits the target area. Also, at the same time, to allow for the step, our back leg bends at the knee, we increase the gap of our back heel from the floor to 10cm(4') whilst the knee of our back leg drops approx 18cm(7') from the floor. 

We now stay in this position and bring the leading hand back to the face and at the same time we throw the backhand towards the mid-section of our opponent whilst pivoting our back foot.

When our leading hand is back at the stance position, our back hand is hitting the target area.

Preview 00:52

From our stance position, we throw our leading hand forward as a jab, once it has travelled approx ¾ of the way out, we then bring the jabbing hand back approx 12cm(4.5’), then straight away we jab forward and complete the jabbing position. 

Preview 00:44

From our stance position, our jabbing hand travels forwards to approx 3/4 of the way out, then immediately start to bring the leading hand back and at the same time we throw our back hand forward in a straight line on completion of the back arm being straight and our back foot in the pivot position, we bring our arm and foot  back to the stance position.

Preview 00:44

From our stance, we start to extend our leading leg, pushing our bodyweight backwards and at the same time we start to bend our rear knee slightly over our back foot, our upper body moves over the back leg approx. 8cm(3’). 

Preview 00:42

Same as above but now when we are in the leanback position, we push off our back leg and start to take our bodyweight forward and at the same time we throw a jab, once our bodyweight is in the central position our jabbing arm is fully extended, we then return the jab back to the stance position.

Leanback Jab
00:47

From our stance we throw a jab, once the jab is fully extended, we start to go into the leanback and at the same time we start to bring back the jab. Once we have reached the 

leanback position our leading hand is back to the stance position, then straight away, we start to straighten the back leg we start to throw the jab, when we are back in the upright stance position, our jab is fully extended.

Jab Leanback Jab
00:48

From our stance, we bend the back leg and straighten the front leg and go into our leanback position. Once completed, we start to throw our backhand and pivot our back foot at the same time, as well as come back to the stance position, when our upper body is central our backhand should be straight out in locked position and our back foot is in a full pivot movement. Then we bring the arm back to the stance position and turn our back foot back to its original position.  

Leanback Straight backhand
00:42

From our stance we throw a jab, then we slip forward, bringing the hand back as the slip is completed. Then we drop our weight and push with our front leg, pushing our body weight onto our back leg. Then as our weight is over our back leg, we start to straighten our back leg, pushing our bodyweight upwards and slightly forwards and at the same time we start to throw our backhand forward once the weave is completed, our back arm is fully locked forward. 

Then immediately we start to pull our back arm back, we start to slip outwards, then once the slip is completed, we drop our bodyweight onto our back leg. Then we go into a weave, pushing our bodyweight from our back leg to the front leg. Once our bodyweight has transferred to the front leg, we start to raise our bodyweight over our front leg and at the same time we start to throw a jab. Then on completion of the weave our jabbing arm is fully locked out, with our feet in the pivot position’s.

We then go back into our stance position.

Jab, weave out straight backhand, then weave in and jab
01:11

From our stance, we throw a jab, then once the jab is fully extended we go into our leanback position and at the same time we bring our arm back. Then, once we are in our leanback and our jabbing hand is back, we start to throw our straight-back hand and pivot our back foot at the same time. Then, as our arm is fully extended and we have pivoted our back foot fully, once completed we return to our stance position.

Jab, lean back, straight backhand
00:47

From our stance position, we are going to jab the body, as explained previously. Once the jab has landed, our legs are bent at the knee with a 90 degree angle, we now at the same time start to throw our backhand straight and  vertically upwards. we also start to bring our leading hand back to the stance position and our back leg starts to glide forward and starts to turn to the pivot position, your back leg glides approx 38cm (15cm) forward with the back foot now is in the full pivot position and our front leg starts to straighten, once completed we bring ourselves back into the stance position.  

Jab to the body, straight backhand to the head
00:45

Adults will use a 9’ rope. Hold the rope behind you with your arms fully extended. Start with the rope resting on the floor. Holding the rope loosely; slowly start to rotate your arms forwards. Take the rope over your head and then towards the floor. When the rope approaches your feet, jump by just clearing the rope, bending your knees slightly. Landing on the balls of your feet. Continue repeating this action but keeping your hands by yours slides at all times. Your hands should be slightly adrift from your body and there should only be a small rotation in your forearms. 

Basic Skipping
03:25
About the Instructor
Glenn Smith
4.7 Average rating
6 Reviews
30 Students
1 Course
Professional Boxing Coach

Professional Boxing Coach with more than 30 years experience. British Board of Boxing official coach, I've coached professional Boxers, Amateur Boxers and also UFC Fighters. 

I own the award winning Red Corner Gym in my home town, Coventry, UK. Over the years I have set up the first grading system in boxing for my students. I have also created Boxing Coach Courses which have been endorsed by Skills Active and provides the learner with 8 REPs Points upon completion.