How To Lose Weight With Bodyweight Exercises and HIIT
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How To Lose Weight With Bodyweight Exercises and HIIT

Over 100 bodyweight exercises and High Intensity Interval Training exercises, plus a 3 month daily workout plan!
5.0 (1 rating)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
10 students enrolled
Created by Nathanael Elmore
Last updated 4/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $45 Discount: 78% off
5 hours left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 3 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Use bodyweight and high intensity interval training exercises to get in shape and lose body fat without going to the gym or purchasing any equipment.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • You should be medically cleared for moderate physical exercise, and be in good health
Description

Discover how to get and stay in shape with NO EQUIPMENT (occasionally a pull up bar) NO GYM MEMBERSHIP, and NO HASSLE!!! BLAST AWAY THE FAT!!! Learn over 100 Bodyweight Exercises, including Upper Body Pushing Exercises, Upper Body Pulling Exercises, Lower Body, Exercises, and Core Exercises 

Fire your metabolism back up with HIGH INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING (HIIT), one of the most effective fat burning and endurance workout protocols known today. HIIT is EFFICIENT and EFFECTIVE! You can get a great HIIT workout in as little as TWO MINUTES! HIIT gives you sustained calorie and FAT BURNING for HOURS after a workout! 

At the end of the course, you'll get a three month daily bodyweight training plan. Once you get into a good routine, you can customize your plan to suit your needs, shuffle the exercises around, or choose from the 100+ exercises demonstrated in this course! 

So, to recap, you're getting…

An extensive library of over 100 bodyweight exercises 
Resources that help you understand the muscles you're using
High intensity interval training 
My 3 month daily bodyweight exercise guide

Here's what you're not getting…

Gym fees $50-$150/month
Stuck in traffic on the way to the gym
A crowded noisy gym, where all the machines are taken
The scent of other people's stank all up in your nose
Self conscious 

So take a moment, think about what you're getting, and what you're not. I'll see you in the first lesson! 


Who is the target audience?
  • People with busy schedules, who don't have time to go to the gym
  • People who want to get in shape and lose body fat, it don't know where to start.
Compare to Other Body Building Courses
Curriculum For This Course
112 Lectures
01:24:40
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Welcome!
1 Lecture 01:30

Welcome to my bodyweight exercise course! My goal is to teach you all the bodyweight exercises I know, so that you never have to rely on a gym to get in shape, and spend your hard earned money on gym fees or a personal trainer! Your body is the only gym you need, and I'll show you how to make the most of it! My course contains over 100 exercises, that will get you stronger, leaner, and healthier, in just a matter of weeks. I've also included a 3 month, daily bodyweight workout plan for you to follow along with. After following this guide, you'll be ready to design your own workouts, and build strength, stamina, and flexibility at will!

Preview 01:30
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Lower Body Exercises
27 Lectures 24:23

Having a proper hip hinge is absolutely essential to the proper execution of most lower body exercises. A properly executed hip hinge alleviates stress on the knees and back, and involves the glutes in the movement, in addition to the quads. To properly execute a hip hinge, you must ensure that the hip joint is the most mobile during the motion. This means you must keep your back straight, avoid letting your knees pass your toes, and extending your butt as far to the rear as possible, keeping your weight on your heels. 

Concept video - Hip Hinge
02:07

The basic, all encompassing lower body exercise. Start with your feet spread slightly wider than shoulder width, toes pointed straight forward, or slightly outward, whatever feels most comfortable. Next, lower yourself so that your thighs are parallel to the ground, utilizing a proper hip hinge. Raise your body, and thrust your hips forward at the top of the range of motion, and repeat. Ensure that your knees do not jut out over your toes, as this places additional stress on your knee joint. This can be avoided by having a good hip hinge. 

Preview 01:05

Lunges train the legs to press your body's weight one leg at a time. Start with your feet spread slightly wider than shoulder width, toes pointed straight forward. Next, step forward, or backward, ensuring that your step is far enough that your knee does not jut over your toes. Lower yourself until your opposite knee touches the ground, raise, and return to your starting position.

Lunges
01:36

Cherry pickers are simultaneously a stretch and exercise involving your hamstrings and glutes. Begin by standing with your feet two times your shoulder width apart. Keeping your legs straight, knees nearly locked out, bend forward and touch the ground three times, each touch coming closer towards your body, in between your legs. Then, raise your torso back up to the starting position using your hamstrings and glutes to pull. 

Cherry pickers
00:46

Toe Tapping places one leg at a time in a very unstable position, and forces the inner part of the quad to work on supporting your weight, while you change your center of gravity. Begin by standing on one leg. With your other leg, extend your foot out as far as possible and touch the ground with your toes. In front, to your sides, behind, at random order. 

Toe Tappers
01:05

Sunken squats place more emphasis on your glutes due to the wider stance. Start by standing with your feet two times your shoulder width. Then, using a good hip hinge motion, lower yourself until thighs are parallel to the ground. Raise back up. 

Sunken Squat
00:29

The Hindu squat is a fast paced version of the standard air squat. Start by standing with your feet shoulder width apart, toes pointed forward. Try to keep your weight on your toes. Quickly lower yourself until you are able to brush the ground with the back of your fingers, then raise up quickly, and repeat, keeping the same rhythm. Because of the faster exercise tempo, it is ok for your knees to briefly pass your toes. 

Hindu Squat
00:59

The Low Hindu Squat contains the same steps as the standard Hindu squat, the only difference being the range of motion. During the upward portion of the movement, do not fully straighten your legs, but only come ¾ of the way up, and repeat. 

Low Hindu Squat
00:21

The catcher squat is a two part exercise that targets your glutes and quads. Start by standing with your feet together. Lower yourself with a good hip hinge until your thighs are parallel to the ground, while keeping your arms fully extended in front of you. Keeping your arms parallel to your thighs, unbend and straighten your knees until your hands touch the ground. Reverse the last movement, and return to the starting position. 

Catchers Squat
00:36

The Bear Squat is a unique way to challenge your glutes and quads. Get down into a modified downward dog position, then lower your knees until they're a few inches off the ground. Move your butt close to your heels. This is the starting position. Using your quads push your body forward until your head passes your hands, then return to the starting position. 

Bear Squat
00:24

The High Bear Squat is a variation on the standard bear squat. Get into the bear squat starting position. From there, straighten your legs while also keeping your back straight. Lower back to starting position. 

High Bear Squat
00:53

The Extended Bear Squat takes the range of motion farther than that traditional bear squat. This brings your chest and shoulders into play. From the bear squat starting position, push forward until your head and shoulders pass your hands. Then return to the starting position. 

Extended Bear Squat
00:40

Dirty dogs place emphasis on the muscles in the hips that help with lateral movement. Start by getting down on all fours. Next, keeping your knee locked in place at a 90 degree angle, raise your leg straight out to the side, then return to the starting position.

Dirty Dogs
00:33

Start by getting down on your hands and knees. Next, straighten and extend one leg as far back as possible, raising the leg as high as possible. Return to starting position and switch legs. This exercise places tension on your glutes by putting your leg in a position in which the glutes have very little leverage, and must therefore work harder to keep the leg stabilized. 

Mule Kick
00:55

Follow same steps as a standard Mule Kick. When leg is fully extended, move leg from left to right, then return to starting position.

Dynamic Mule Kick
00:38

This is a hamstring isolation exercise. Start with your feet together. Keeping one leg in place on the ground, lean forward, while lifting your other leg behind you, in a straight line with your torso. Maintain a straight back. Bend forward until you're able to touch the ground with your arm extended straight down, then, using your hamstring and glute, pull yourself back up to the starting position. 

Single Leg Romanian Deadlift
01:27

Hip thrusts are a great glute isolation exercise. Start by laying flat on your back, with your knees bent and raised. Placing all your weight on your heels, and upper back raise your hips off the floor as high as possible, pause for a moment at the top, then lower to the starting position. 

Hip Thrusters
00:43

Beat your boots is primarily a quad isolation exercise. With your feet together, bend forward and grab your ankles. Keeping your hands on your ankles, lower your butt towards the ground all the way. Press back up into the starting position. 

Beat Your Boots
00:28

Sumo Squats place major emphasis on your glutes. Taking a wide stance, turn your feet outward roughly 45 degrees. Then, using a hip hinge, lower yourself down until your thighs are parallel to the ground. Raise back up to the starting position. 

Preview 00:38

Side Lunges strengthen your hips, glutes, and quads. Starting with your feet together, step out to one side about 2 1/2 times your shoulder length, and lower your body in a squatting motion. Press back up, and return to the starting position. 

Side Lunges
01:00

The Boat Exercise uses the strength of your quads to pull your upper body off the ground. Laying down on your stomach, reach behind and grab your ankles. Holding on to your ankles, use your quads to pull your torso off the ground. This exercise can be done in a static hold, or for reps. 

Boat Exercise
01:05

The Sinking Boat Exercise differs from the boat exercise only in that you only use one hand instead of two. This forces each individual quad to work harder. 

Sinking Boat Exercise
01:12

One Legged Bird Squats challenge you to maintain your balance while squatting with one leg. Standing with your feet together, arms fully extended out to the side at shoulder level, lean forward, keeping your non standing leg completely straight. Try to make your entire body, except the leg you're standing on, parallel to the ground. From there, squat on that one leg as low as you can, before pressing back up to the starting position. 

One Legged Bird Squat
00:47

The Falling Tower Exercise not only looks cool, it's a great and unique way to strengthen your quads. Starting on your knees, with your thighs and shins at a 90 degree angle to one another, lean back moving only your knee joint. Keep your back straight and your hips locked. Lean back as far as you can without falling, then, using your quads, pull yourself back up to the starting position. 

Falling Tower Exercise
00:43

Duck Walks are a great quad and glute conditioning exercise. Start by squatting down like a baseball catcher, keeping your weight in your toes, walk from point A to point B, staying at that level the entire time. 

Duck Walks
00:38

Good mornings are similar to cherry pickers. The same concept of keeping straight legs and a straight back still applies. Use the hamstrings and glutes to pull your torso. Start with your feet spread apart slightly wider than shoulder width, toes pointed forward. Place your hands behind your head. Keeping a straight back, and straight legs, bend forward in a bowing motion, until you begin to feel tension on your hamstrings and glutes, then reverse, and raise back up.

Good Morning Exercise
01:36

Pistol Squats are one of the highest level leg exercises available. It requires a tremendous amount of strength in each leg, as well as hamstring flexibility. Starting with your feet together, begin lowering your body in a squatting motion. As you lower your body, begin to extend one leg straight out in front of you. Get as low as you're able to. If you do not have the flexibility and strength to hold out your other leg straight out in front of you, grab your knee to hold your leg up. Press back up to the starting position. 

Pistol Squats
00:59
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Upper Body Pushing Exercises
31 Lectures 26:02

Having a straight back is essential in order to get the most out of these exercises. Not all the exercises in this section call for a straight back, but it is nonetheless important to be familiar with the concept. 

Concept video - Straight Back
01:19

Push ups are easily the most well known body weight exercise in existence. What isn't so well known however, is how to properly execute a push up. Start with your hands directly beneath your shoulders, fingers pointed directly ahead. If needed, rotate hands outward until shoulders feel most comfortable. Spread fingers. Maintain a straight back, not arched, not sagging. Lower yourself down, ensuring that elbows flare out at a roughly 45 degree angle, until your chest touches the ground. Push back up until your elbows lock out. 

Preview 01:36

Spider push-ups add in leg moment to the standard push up. During the lowering portion of the movement, attempt to make one knee touch your elbow on the same side, then return leg to original position. Push back up. Repeat on opposite side. 

Spider Push Up
00:34

The Rolling Push Up is a fun variation of the standard push up. Start in the down position of a standard push up. Push up to the top, lower back down, then roll to your right, push back up to the top, then repeat. 

Rolling Push Up
00:39

The leaning tower push up emphasizes the pectoral muscle on one side, and takes the other out of the equation. Get into standard push up position, then place one elbow on the ground. From there, lower yourself. You'll notice that your body will drift to the side with the hand on the ground. Push back up, and your body will torso will shift back towards the other side.

Leaning Tower Push Up
00:45

Hindu Push Ups are an all encompassing, nearly complete upper body workout in one movement. Starting in a downward dog position, keeping your head between your arms, and your back straight, leading with your chest. Dip your chest down, brush the ground lightly, and continue to push forward and up, in a U motion. Return to downward dog position. 

Hindu Push Up
01:14

Heart Push Ups are a variation of the diamond pushup that gets more shoulder involvement. Get into a pushup position. From there, make a diamond with your hands, and place the diamond at heart level. Spread your legs for balance. Lower your body, allowing your elbows to flare out to the side. Push back up to the starting position. 

Heart Push Up
00:40

The Frog Push Up is another variation of the standard push up that places emphasis on your shoulders. Starting on all fours, with your knees and elbows about 6 inches apart, lower yourself headfirst diagonally forward, letting your head touch the floor, then pushing back up. 

Frog Push Up
00:30

Earthquake push ups are more of a core exercise than a push up, however, it does involve pushing. Starting from a standard push up position, lower one elbow to the ground, followed by the elbow on the other side. Next, raise the first elbow off the ground, then the second. The idea is to keep your back straight as possible while you are put in unstable positions. 

Earthquake Push Up
00:30

The Stretch Push Up is a challenging variation of the standard push up, which takes away leverage, and forces the muscles in your arms to work harder to keep your body elevated. Start in the standard push up position. Slowly walk your hands out forward as far as you are able while staying elevated. From there, lower your body in a push up manner, then push back up to the starting position. 

Stretch Push Up
00:41

The Stretch Walk Push Up emphasizes your core triceps, shoulders and chest. Starting from a standard push up position, walk your hands forward slowly as far as you can, keeping your back straight. Walk your hands back to the starting point. 

Stretch Walk Push Up
00:43

The Grand Canyon Push Up is used to place greater emphasis on your chest. Hand width can be adjusted to preference. Start from a modified push up position, in which your hands are spread farther apart than shoulder length. Then, keeping your elbows flared diresctly out to your sides, lower yourself to the ground until your chest touches. Push back up to the starting position. 

Preview 00:38

Diamond Kiss Push Ups are yet another more difficult version of the standard push up. This particular variation is designed to destabilize you, forcing your arms to work harder to keep you elevated. Starting in a modified push up position, with your feet spread for balance, your hands in diamond shape, directly beneath your mouth. Lower yourself down until your nose touches the back of your hands, then push back up to the starting position. 

Diamond Kiss Push Up
00:52

The Clap Push Up is designed to develop explosive strength in your chest and triceps. Starting from a standard pushup position, lower yourself down to the ground, until your chest touches. From there, explode up off the ground, launching your upper body off the ground. While in mid air, quickly clap your hands once before you fall back down. Repeat at a quick and consistent tempo. 

Clap Push Up
00:46

The Three Prong Push Up is designed to involve your flutes one at a time, as well as develop balance. Starting from a standard push up position, lower yourself down to the ground, while at the same time elevating one leg off the ground. Push back up to the starting position, repeat, while alternating legs. 

Three Prong Push Up
00:53

Condensed push ups are designed to place emphasis on your triceps. Starting from a standard push up position, keeping your elbows tucked against your sides, lower yourself down to the ground, until your chest touches, then push back up to the starting position. You want your upper arms to maintain contact with your sides at all times. 

Condensed Push Up
00:45

Rocker Push Ups are a hybrid of the Bear Squat, and a traditional Push Up. Start in a modified push up position, with your feet slightly spread. Lower yourself down, then push back up. When you push back up, push yourself all the way back into the starting position of a bear squat. 

Rocker Push Ups
00:45

Staggered Push Ups force your chest and triceps to work in different ways than the standard push up. Start in a traditional push up position. Place one hand above the shoulder, the other below. From there, lower yourself to the ground, then push back up. 

Staggered Push Ups
00:58

The Dive Bomber is very similar to the hindu push up. The key difference is the position of the hands and elbows. Starting from a modified downward dog position, with your head between your arms, imagine you're going under a fence and move your torso, leading with your head in a U shaped motion. From there, reverse, and push yourself backwards up into the starting position. 

Dive Bomber Push Ups
01:02

The Half Dive Bomber is very similar to the hindu push up. The key difference is the position of the hands and elbows. Starting from a modified downward dog position, with your head between your arms, imagine you're going under a fence and move your torso, leading with your head in a U shaped motion. From there, raise your butt and return to the starting position. 

Half Dive Bomber Push Ups
00:36

The One Arm Push Up Hold is the first step in the progression up to a true one handed push up. Start in a modified pushup position, with legs spread far apart for balance, and one hand on the ground, centered under your sternum. Place your other hand behind your back. From there, hold the position, concentrate on your triceps and chest. If this position is too easy, slowly lower yourself down until you can't any longer, then push back up, and repeat. Over time, you will be able to do more and more, ultimately resulting in a true one handed push up. 

One Arm Push Up Hold
01:15

Table Push Ups are a departure from the usual face down position of most push up variations. Instead, start by sitting on your butt, with your hands braced on the floor on either side, just behind your hips. Place your feet on the ground in front of you, with your knees elevated. From there, thrust your hips upward, so that your back and hips are straight, your arms are straight, and your knees are bent at 90 degrees. Your body should somewhat resemble a table. Lower your body back to the starting position, then repeat. 

Table Push Up
00:44

The Crab Walk builds on the table push up concept, and introduces total body movement. Get into a table push up position, with your hips slightly sagging. Staying in this position, walk from point A to point B. 

Crab Walk
00:43

The No Arm Push Up utilizes your upper back and chest, and takes your arms out of the movement. Get into a modified push up position, with your elbows on the ground. From there, raise and lower your body, using only your chest and upper back and shoulder blades. 

No Arm Push Ups
00:48

The Chinese Push Up is designed to emphasize your shoulders and triceps. Getting into a modified downward dog position, with your hands in a diamond shape, lower yourself down head first, keeping your head in between your arms. Touch your head to the ground, keeping your elbows tucked to your sides, then push back up to the starting position. 

Chinese Push Ups
00:37

Sun Gods are a very simple shoulder exercise. There are three working positions. The first is with your hands out to either side at shoulder level. The second is with your hands out in front of you at shoulder level. The last is your hands straight up in the air. In all positions, arms will be fully extended. The idea is to move your hands in small circles, as quickly as possible. Hands should be rotated in one direction, then the other. It is recommended that the three positions be done one after the other, for a predetermined amount of time.  

Sun Gods
01:50

The Shoulder Press is very similar to the Chinese push up. The only difference is the position of the elbow. Starting from a modified downward dog position, hands placed slightly wider than shoulder width apart, lower yourself down head first, keeping your head in between your arms. Keep your elbows pointed straight out to your sides, then push back up into the starting position. 

Shoulder Press
00:30

The Thumbs Up exercise emphasizes your triceps, by changing the hand positioning. Get down into a modified push up position, with your hands making the thumbs up sign. Your hands will naturally be forward if your shoulders. From there, lower yourself down to the ground, then push all the way back up. 

Thumbs up
00:47

The Claw Push Up is specifically designed to work on your hand and finger strength. Start in a standard push up position, with your weight on your fingers, instead of your palms. From there, lower yourself down in a standard push up motion, then push back up. 

Claw Push Up
00:53

The X Push Up is designed to involve your core more in the movement. Get into a push up position, with your hands and feet spread as far apart as you're comfortable with. From there, lower yourself to the ground, then push up to the top. 

Preview 00:49

The One Arm Push Up is the most difficult exercise in this section. It requires tremendous triceps strength. Start in a modified pushup position, with legs spread far apart for balance, and one hand on the ground, centered under your sternum. Place your other hand behind your back. Lower yourself to the ground as low as possible, then push back up to the starting position. 

One Arm Push Up
00:40
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Core Exercises
26 Lectures 15:32

The Helicopter Exercise forces you to stay balanced while in an unstable position, additionally working your core with a twisting motion. Start in a modified push up position, with your feet spread for balance. From there, take one hand and place it behind your head. Leading with your elbow, twist your body from side to side, going as far as possible in either direction. 

Helicopter Exercise
00:25

Mountain climbers are a great exercise for your core, because it forces your abdominals to hold your torso up in a plank position, while also stabilizing the torso as your knees are brought up towards your chest. Start in a push up position. Bring one knee up towards your chest, leaving the other still. Begin by quickly alternating the positions of your legs, in a jumping motion, between your chest, and the straightened out position. Can be a timed exercise, or done to a predetermined number of reps. 

Mountain Climbers
00:26

The Plank position is a basic static hold position that targets your entire core. Starting from a push up position, lower yourself down to your elbows. From there, you simply maintain the position, keeping your back straight, and your hips off the ground. Challenge yourself, and see how long you can hold the position. 

Preview 00:37

The side plank is the same concept as the standard plank, only emphasizing your obliques on one side. From a plank position, completely remove one arm off the ground, rest it at your side, and turn your body so that the side of the elbow on the ground is facing the ground. Keep your back straight and your hips off the ground. Challenge yourself and see how long you can hold the position. Repeat from the other side. 
Side Plank
00:30

Six Inches is a common abdominal conditioning exercise in most sports. Start by lying flat on your back, with your hands under your butt, for lower back support. From there, keep your feet together, and raise them approximately six inches off the ground, and hold the position for as long as you can, or for a predetermined time. 

Preview 00:31

The Scissors exercise is another modification of the six inches position. Starting from the six inches position, with your hands under your butt for lower back support, spread your legs, then bring them back to the center, crossing them. Spread again, and cross, this time with the other leg being on top. Spread, and continue to alternate the leg on top. Keep your core tight throughout. 

Scissors Exercise
00:52

The Hello Dollie is a variant of the six inches concept. Starting in the six inches position, with your hands under your butt for lower back support, spread your legs apart as wide as possible, then bring them together again. Repeat. Maintain a tight core. 

Hello Dollie
00:39

The Lunge Sit Up is a variation of the standard crunch. Lie down on your back, place your hands behind your head, and lift your legs off the ground, and bring your knees towards your chest. 

Lunge Sit Up
00:32

 Under the arch is great for developing balance. Start from a downward dog position. Keeping your balance, touch your left elbow and your right knee. Return to starting position. Touch your right elbow and your left knee. Return to starting position. 

Under The Arch
00:55

Flutter kicks are a variant of the six inches concept. Lie down flat on your back. Place your hands under your butt for lower back support. Raise your legs, and begin alternating them up and down, kicking as if you were swimming. 

Flutter Kicks
00:23

 The Horse Sit Up is a common exercise in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Lie flat on your back. Raise your legs off the ground, spread them, and bring your knees in toward you chest, until they're in line with your hips. Freezing your legs in place, touch your toes, then lower back down. 

Horse Sit Up
00:34

The Hip Dip is essentially the same concept as the side plank, with added movement. Starting from a side plank position, lower your hips to the ground, touch, and lift back up until your back is straight. 

Hip Dip
00:30

Bicycle Crunches incorporate dynamic twisting movements into the basic crunch. Lie down on your back, place your hands behind your head. Touch your left elbow and right knee, rapidly switch, touching your right elbow to your left knee, and continue to alternate. 

Bicycle Crunch
00:32

Grandfather Clocks are another great way to challenge your obliques. Lie flat on your back, and raise your legs straight up in the air. Keeping them together, lower both to one side as far as possible, then raise back up and lower them to the opposite side. Imagine you are drawing a rainbow shape with your feet. 

Grandfather Clock
00:40

The Fallen Cross is the easiest variation of the fallen cross exercise. Set one hand on the ground, face to the side, keeping both arms straight, as well as your back. Hold for as long as you can, then repeat on opposite side. 

Fallen Cross
00:25

The Dolphin Push Up is essentially a Plank, but with movement added in. Begin in a plank position. From there use your abs to raise your butt straight up in the air. Lower back down to the starting position. Your upper arms will shift slightly at the shoulder joint, this is normal. 

Dolphin Push Up
00:36

Grasshoppers are a more dynamic version of the mountain climber. Start in a push up position. Bring one knee up towards your chest, leaving the other still. Begin by quickly alternating the positions of your legs, in a jumping motion, between your chest, and the straightened out position. When you bring your knee up to your chest, swing it underneath your body and out the opposite side as well. 

Grasshoppers
00:57

Russian Twists force your abdominals to hold your body up, while you twist from side to side. Lie flat on your back, bring your knees closer to your chest, feet elevated. Place your hands behind your head. Do a standard crunch, holding yourself in the up position. Turn your body side to side as far as you can go, for as long as you can. 

Russian Twists
00:33

The Crunch is the most basic of all the core exercises. Lie flat on your back. Place both hands behind your head. Do not grab onto your neck or head. Bring your knees closer to your chest. From there raise your torso off the ground, until you reach about a 45 degree angle. Lower back down to the ground. 

Crunch
00:25

Leg Lifts are an extremely simple exercise. Lie flat on your back. Place your hands under your butt for lower back support. Lift your legs until they're completely vertical, then lower back to six inches. Do not touch the ground. Repeat. 

Leg Lifts
00:28

The Superman Exercise is designed to target the muscles that line your spine, and your lower back. Lie flat on your stomach. Fully extend and join your hands and feet, respectively. Keeping your arms and legs straight, lift them both off the ground as high as you can. Return to starting position, and repeat. 

Superman
00:31

S&M Push Ups are a great exercise for improving balance. Start in a modified push up position, with your feet spread for balance. At the same time, taking care to maintain your balance, raise and fully extend your right arm and left leg. Return to start. Raise your left arm and right leg. Return to start. 

S&M Push Ups
00:46

Gymnastic Leg Lifts are extremely challenging for your lower abdominals, one of the hardest areas to target. Sit on the ground with your legs together and straight out in front of you. Place your hands on the ground outside your legs, at or near knee level. Lean back slightly, and raise your legs as high as possible, keeping them firmly straight and together. 

Gymnastic Leg Lifts
00:48

The Table Stretcher is good for your entire back, your glutes, hamstrings, and triceps. Sit down with your legs fully extended in front of you. Place your hands at your sides, at hip level. Thrust your hips forward, and straighten your back, so that all your weight is placed on your heels, and your hands. Your entire body, with the exception of your arms, should be in line. 

Table Stretcher
00:43

The Spider Man Walk is a total body exercise that relies on your core to stabilize your body. Your hands and feet should be the only points of contact with the ground. Crawl as low as possible from point A to point B, flaring your elbows and knees out to the sides. 

Spider Man Walk
00:32

The Bear Crawl is essentially the opposite of the Spider man walk, in that your body should be rather high off the ground. Start in a modified downward dog position. Keeping your back arched, crawl on your hands and feet from point A to point B. 

Bear Crawl
00:42
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Upper Body Pulling Exercises
13 Lectures 06:27

When doing any pull up variation, it is essential that you do complete repetitions. Your chin must clear the bar at the top of the movement, and your arms must be straight at the bottom, with your elbows locked out. 

Concept Video - All The Way Up, All The Way Down
00:20

The Pull Up is one of the staple exercises in the Marine Corps. We do pull ups because they are a true measure of upper body strength. You just can't fake a pull up. Pull ups engage your back and biceps. Start by grasping the bar, palms facing away from you, slightly wider than shoulder width. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Preview 00:23

The Wide Grip Pull Up is the same as the standard pull up, only with a wider grip. Start by grasping the bar, palms facing away from you, much wider than shoulder width. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Wide Grip Pull Up
00:21

The Narrow Grip Pull Up follows the same steps as the standard pull up, only with a narrower grip. Start by grasping the bar, palms facing away from you, less than shoulder width apart. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Narrow Grip Pull Up
00:28

The Side To Side Pull Up is a somewhat difficult pull up variation that further emphasizes your back muscles, by placing them under dynamic tension. Start by grasping the bar, palms facing away from you, slightly wider than shoulder width. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar. Holding yourself in the top position, move your body from side to side, as if you were trying to touch your hands with your chin. Move to each side, return to the center, then lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Side To Side Pull Up
00:25

The Alternating Pull up is a pull up variation that allows you to emphasize one side of your back at a time, which can help prevent imbalances in muscle development. Stand sideways under the pull up bar, so that the bar runs over your head from front to back. From there, grasp the bar with your palms facing each other, but staggered. Pull yourself up so that your head is on one side of the bar, then lower. Pull up again, this time with your head on the other side of the bar. Repeat. 

Alternating Pull Up
00:31

The Chin Up differs from the pull up in the way you grip the bar. Your palms will face towards you. Grasp the bar, hands at shoulder width. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Chin Up
00:25

The Wide Grip Chin Up is the same as the standard chin up, just with a wider grip. Grasp the bar, palms facing you, wider than shoulder width. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Wide Grip Chin Up
00:27

The Narrow Grip Chin Up is just like the standard chin up, only with a narrower grip. Grasp the bar, palms facing you, less than shoulder width. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Narrow Grip Chin Up
00:27

Front Lever Pull Ups are a fun pull up variation that changes the angle of movement. Gripping the bar palms facing away, at shoulder width, swing your body upward, and bring your knees to your chest. Your back should be facing the ground. Keeping that position, pull yourself up towards the bar, then lower. As you get stronger, you'll be able to move your knees farther away from your chest, eventually straightening one leg completely, then the other. This position is known as the front lever in gymnastics.

Front Lever Pull Up
00:32

The Gymnastic Pull Up is a challenging pull up variation. It is essentially a pull up with your legs fully extended in front of you. Start by grasping the bar, palms facing away from you, slightly wider than shoulder width. Keep your legs and feet together, and raise them straight out in front of you. From there, pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar, making sure to control your body movement, so that you don't swing back and forth. Lower your body back to a dead hang, elbows locked out. 

Gymnastic Pull Up
00:29

The Flexed Arm Hang is an excellent exercise for building up the necessary strength to eventually do a full pull up or chin up. Grip and hand spacing are entirely up to you. With your selected grip, jump up to the top position, with your chin over the bar, and hold. Hold that position for as long as possible. Even as your strength lessens, continue to try and hold position for as long as you can, until your arms are eventually straight and locked out at the bottom. 

Flexed Arm Hang
00:52

The Reverse Shrug is a great way to build up strength to eventually be able to do a chin up or pull up. Grip and hand spacing are up to you. With your chosen grip, come to a dead hang on the bar. Keeping your elbows locked, pull your body up slightly, imagining you are shrugging your shoulders. Once this becomes easy, pull yourself up to a comfortable height, then lower back down. Eventually, you'll build up enough strength to get your chin over the bar. 

Reverse Shrug
00:47
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High Intensity Interval Training
13 Lectures 09:27

Interval timing is an essential part of High Intensity Interval Training. The amount of time spent working, and resting determines how long you'll be able to sustain the movements, as well as the effectiveness of the workout. The most effective interval timing is known as the Tabata protocol, or the Tabata. The Tabata consists of 20 seconds of work, and 10 second of rest. This protocol can be effective when implemented as a 2 to 4 minute total workout time. 

Concept Video - Interval Timing
01:07

The Burpee is a total Brady movement that is very taxing. Starting in a standing position, quickly drop down into a push up position. Execute a push up, quickly get back to your feet, and jump as high as possible, while reaching for the sky. This is done as quickly and fluidly as possible. 

Burpees
00:44

High Knees are a common conditioning exercise. The idea is to bring your knees up to your chest, in alternating fashion, as fast and as high as possible. 

Preview 00:36

Star Jumpers are very challenging to sustain over longer periods of time. They're great for your quads and glutes. Start with your feet together, and your fingers touching the ground. In one explosive movement, jump up into the air, come into a spread eagle, or star position with your hands and feet spread, then bring them back together, landing in the same position you were in before you jumped. You will start and finish the movement with your feet together, fingers touching the ground.

Star Jumpers
00:48

Four Count Bodybuilders can be thought of as a slower, broken up version of the Burpee. You may want to use this exercise as a build up to the burpee, if you are not properly conditioned. The exercise is broken up into four distinct movements, hence the name. One, drop down into a low squat, hands on the ground. Two, kick your legs back out, so you're in a push up position. Three, bring your legs back to a low squat. Four, stand back up. It is best to follow a consistent rhythm when doing this exercise. You can also count out loud to keep yourself on time. 1 2 3 1, 1 2 3 2, 1 2 3 3, 1 2 3 4, etc. 

Four Count Bodybuilders
01:10

Eight Count Bodybuilders are just a more complicated version of the Four Count Bodybuilders. One, drop down to a low squat. Two, kick out your legs into a push up position. Three, lower yourself to the ground. Four, push back up. Five, spread your feet in a quick, hopping motion. Six, bring your feet back together. Seven, bring your knees to your chest in a low squat. Eight, stand all the way back up. Follow a consistent rhythm throughout the exercise. 

Eight Count Bodybuilders
00:51

Quarter side jumps are a great way to build up leg strength, and explosive power. Start standing up, and jump sideways as far to the left as you can, as high as you can. When you land, hip hinge a quarter of the way down. Jump back to the right in the same fashion. As soon as you land, jump immediately to the other side. 

Quarter Side Jump
00:43

Half Side Jumps are the next step in the side jump progression. This time, when you land, you'll hip hinge half way down. Each time you land, explosively jump to the other side. 

Half Side Jump
00:29

Full Side Jumps are the most difficult level of the side jump progression. In this exercise, each time you land, you will executes full hip hinge on the way down. Explode back up and jump to the other side. 

Full Side Jump
00:28

Quarter squat jumps are the easiest level of the squat jump progression. Execute a quarter hip hinge one the way down, then explode up and jump as high as possible. Jump again immediately after landing. 

Preview 00:56

Half Squat Jumps are the next level in the Squat Jump progression. Execute a half hip hinge on the way down, then explode up and jump as high as possible. Jump again immediately after landing. 

Half Squat Jump
00:25

Full Squat Jumps are the highest level in the Squat Jump progression. Execute a full hip hinge, then explode up, jumping as high as possible. Jump again immediately after landing, in a continuous cycle. 

Full Squat Jump
00:32

The Jumping Lunge is a dynamic movement that takes all the mechanics of a standard Lunge, and incorporates explosive movement. Beginning by stepping forward as if doing a standard Lunge, jump off the ground as hard and fast as possible, switch leg positions in mid air, drop down into a lunge again, and repeat. 

Jumping Lunges
00:38
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3 Month Daily Workout Plan
1 Lecture 01:19

This is your three month daily workout guide! Do one block of exercises each day. Days 1 and 5 of the work week will be High Intensity Interval Training. I recommend downloading a "Round Timer" app to help you with your interval timing. It can be set for 20 second rounds with 10 seconds of rest in between. Two rounds with two rest periods adds up to a minute. Click on the resources below to get your workout plan!

Preview 01:19
About the Instructor
Nathanael Elmore
5.0 Average rating
1 Review
14 Students
2 Courses
US Marine, Podcaster, Fitness Enthusiast, Entrepreneur

Hi everyone! My name is Nate Elmore. I'm a 5 year veteran of the Marine Corps Reserve, a Podcaster, and Entrepreneur. Sharing information is one of my greatest passions in life. I regularly learn and share new things on my podcast, Achieving ALPHA, in my Marine Corps Career, and in my personal life. From the time I was a young boy, I've been fascinated with sports, including nutrition and training methods. For me, learning a new exercise routine or training method is exciting, and a great opportunity to Push the boundaries of what I'm capable of. Over the years, I've picked up quite a bit of knowledge and experience, and I'd love to share some of that with you.