Blues Guitar Lessons - Volume 2 - Slow Blues Essentials

Master the expressive, soulful art of slow blues guitar playing.
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  • Lectures 11
  • Length 2 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
    Certificate of Completion
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About This Course

Published 2/2016 English

Course Description

In this series of lessons, taught by top UK session guitarist, Bobby Harrison, we’re going to be focusing on soloing over a slow blues.

You’ve probably heard this kind of playing if you’re familiar with songs such as "Red House","Texas Flood", "How Blue Can You Get", "Be Careful With A Fool", "The Sky Is Crying”, “Five Long Years”…the list goes on.

Slow blues is an extremely expressive form of blues, since it allows for a lot of freedom in terms of phrasing and dynamics.

Since the blues is an improvisational form of music, it’s harder to teach than some other styles. For generations, blues musicians have picked up licks and soloing ideas from other players, so feel free to use the ideas presented here in your own solos. Eventually, like the generations of blues guitarists before you, you’ll make them your own.

As Bobby mentioned in Blues Guitar Lessons - Volume 1, in order to play blues, you need to be able to hear blues and in order to hear it, you need to listen to a lot of it. The ingredients are pretty straight forward in terms of the scales and chords used, but there’s so much more to this form of music in terms of feel, taste, phrasing and expression.

Again, put together a play list of your favourite blues songs and listen to it as often as you can to really internalise the style.

What are the requirements?

  • All you need in order to begin is an electric guitar, an amplifier, a pick and a desire to play the blues.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Learn how to solo authentically over a 12 bar slow blues groove.
  • Master many essential blues licks and techniques in the styles of B.B. King, Albert King, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Johnny Winter.
  • Build your soloing and phrasing vocabulary.
  • Add feel to your solos, using a lyrical approach.
  • Learn a deeply expressive, slow blues solo and re-use the licks in your own playing.
  • Learn how to play rhythm guitar over a slow blues groove.
  • Play along with our downloadable backing track.

What is the target audience?

  • Some prior experience of electric guitar is required i.e. at least a basic grasp of chords and scales. This course would suit the intermediate player, but would also be perfect for the advanced player looking to add blues to their skill set.
  • This course can be studied as a standalone subject, or the perfect accompaniment to FretHub’s “Blues Guitar Lessons - Volume 1 - Blues Shuffle Essentials”.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Let's play slow blues!
14:32

In this series of lessons, we’re going to be focusing on soloing over a slow blues.

You’ve probably heard this kind of playing if you’re familiar with songs such as "Red House","Texas Flood", "How Blue Can You Get", "Be Careful With A Fool", "The Sky Is Crying”, “Five Long Years”…the list goes on.

Slow blues is a very expressive form of blues, since it allows for a lot of freedom in terms of phrasing and dynamics.

Since the blues is an improvisational form of music, it’s harder to teach than some other styles. For generations, blues musicians have picked up licks and soloing ideas from other players, so feel free to use the ideas presented here in your own solos. Eventually, like the generations of blues guitarists before you, you’ll make them your own.

As Bobby mentioned in Volume 1, in order to play blues, you need to be able to hear blues and in order to hear it, you need to listen to a lot of it. The ingredients are pretty straight forward in terms of the scales and chords used, but there’s so much more to this form of music in terms of feel, taste, phrasing and expression.

Again, put together a play list of your favourite blues songs and listen to it as much as you can to really internalise the style.

08:16

Slow Blues is actually in the time signature of 12/8, as opposed to 4/4. If you’re not a theory buff, don’t let that confuse you, since your drummer is not likely to count to 12 before the band kicks in. You can still count the song’s pulse as “1, 2, 3, 4”.

Here, Bobby shows us the rhythm guitar part he played on the backing track, using some classy sliding 9th chords.

08:07

Now it’s time to learn the solo Bobby played in the intro video. Bobby plays 3 times over the the 12 bar progression. In the blues, one time around the 12 bar progression is sometimes known as a chorus.

Bobby will break the solo down note for note, a few bars at a time since it contains lots of useful phrases and ideas that you can incorporate into your own playing.

It’s recommended that you listen to the solo at the start of the first video as many times as you can, in order to really internalise the phrasing and melody before you begin learning it.

In the first chorus, Bobby borrows heavily from BB King, mixing both the major and minor pentatonic scales.

07:15

We continue to learn the solo Bobby played in the intro video. Bobby plays 3 times over the the 12 bar progression. In the blues, one time around the 12 bar progression is sometimes known as a chorus.

Bobby will break the solo down note for note, a few bars at a time since it contains lots of useful phrases and ideas that you can incorporate into your own playing.

In the first chorus, Bobby borrows heavily from BB King, mixing both the major and minor pentatonic scales.

11:04

We continue to learn the solo Bobby played in the intro video. Bobby plays 3 times over the the 12 bar progression. In the blues, one time around the 12 bar progression is sometimes known as a chorus.

Bobby will break the solo down note for note, a few bars at a time since it contains lots of useful phrases and ideas that you can incorporate into your own playing.

In the first chorus, Bobby borrows heavily from BB King, mixing both the major and minor pentatonic scales.

09:21

In the second chorus of the solo, Bobby expands on the first chorus, continuing to mix both the major and minor pentatonic scales, but also playing some sophisticated chord tone ideas.

06:23

In the second chorus of the solo, Bobby expands on the first chorus, continuing to mix both the major and minor pentatonic scales, but also playing some sophisticated chord tone ideas.

11:52

In the second chorus of the solo, Bobby expands on the first chorus, continuing to mix both the major and minor pentatonic scales, but also playing some sophisticated chord tone ideas.

10:49

The final 12 bars of our solo are Bobby’s tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King and Johnny Winter. Bobby also throws in some fast Gary Moore-esque licks in order to demonstrate the freedom of timing that’s possible in your phrasing.

05:47

The final 12 bars of our solo are Bobby’s tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King and Johnny Winter. Bobby also throws in some fast Gary Moore-esque licks in order to demonstrate the freedom of timing that’s possible in your phrasing.

17:37

The final 12 bars of our solo are Bobby’s tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert King and Johnny Winter. Bobby also throws in some fast Gary Moore-esque licks in order to demonstrate the freedom of timing that’s possible in your phrasing.

Recommended listening for slow blues:

Stevie Ray Vaughan – Texas Flood

B.B. King – Live At The Regal & Live At Cook County Jail

Albert King – Blues At Sunrise & Blues At Sunset

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Instructor Biography

FretHub Guitar Lessons, Learn from two highly qualified, professional guitar teachers with over 50 years of combined experience.

FretHub is a fresh and comprehensive collection of online guitar lessons, offering hundreds of hours of video tuition, from two highly qualified and respected teachers with over 50 years of combined professional experience.

As session guitarists, between us, we have played alongside artists such as Queen's Brian May, Alice Cooper, Cliff Richard, Olivia Newton-John, Tony Hadley and Gabrielle. As tutors, we have taught thousands of students worldwide.

Our guitar lessons are taught in a down-to-earth manner and presented in a logical and progressive order, providing the consistency and familiarity you get from taking guitar lessons with a private tutor.

Our aim is to give you a solid foundation and equip you with the necessary tools to learn, recognise and employ the guitar techniques and tricks that are used in the making of the music you love.

From beginners through to advanced players, FretHub has everything you need to help you become the guitarist you've always wanted to be.

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