Three Bible Study Methods To Help You Apply The Word of God
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Three Bible Study Methods To Help You Apply The Word of God

This exciting course will walk you through observation, interpretation, and application of God's Word.
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
25 students enrolled
Created by Matthew Rodriguez
Last updated 11/2012
English
Price: Free
Includes:
  • 2 mins on-demand video
  • 37 mins on-demand audio
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
What Will I Learn?
  • By the end of this course you will learn how to read and more accurately understand God's Word.
  • You will be able to apply the principles of God's Word to your life situations.
  • You will receive encouragement and truth from God's Word.
View Curriculum
Description

Ever want to hear the voice of God? Maybe you are going through a difficult situation and you need His encouragement. Perhaps you are recently divorced or have lost a loved one to cancer. Or maybe you have a chronic illness and have lost all hope. If this describes your situation, then there is Hope. 

The Bible is God's primary way of speaking with us today. His Word has words of encouragement and truth, which were written for you. Tragically, many of us find the Bible... well, dusty. Old and out-of-date. We even question whether it is really true? 

If you can relate, then I invite you to take this course. You will learn how to read the Bible so you can better understand it and apply its principles to your life. You will learn three Bible study methods: observation, interpretation, and application. By adopting these methods, you will come away with a better understanding of the Bible so that you can put it to use in your every-day life.

This course can be completed at one sitting, although you will probably want to reflect upon each lesson plan. The course materials contain audio lectures accompanied with interactive transcripts. These materials will challenge you to think about the topic.

You will want to take this course to grow in your knowledge of the most important book ever. Since the Bible is God's primary way of speaking with you, studying His Word allows you to hear words of encouragement and truth directly from Him.

Who is the target audience?
  • Those who are interested in spirituality.
  • Those who have heard of the Bible but don't understand what it means.
  • Those who are interested in what God's Word has to say to them.
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Curriculum For This Course
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Why Waste Time Studying the Bible?
3 Lectures 08:03

Ever want to hear the voice of God? Maybe you are going through a difficult situation and you need His encouragement. Perhaps you are recently divorced or have lost a loved one to cancer. Or maybe you have a chronic illness and have lost all hope. If this describes your situation, then there is Hope. 

Hi, my name is Matt Rodriguez and I created this course entitled, "Three Bible Study Methods To Help You Apply God's Word." Since the Bible is God's primary way of speaking with us today, it's important we know what Scripture says. Tragically, many of us find the Bible... well, dusty. Old and out-of-date. We even question whether it is really true? 

If you can relate, then I invite you to take this course. You will learn how to read the Bible so you can better understand it and apply its principles to your life. You will learn three Bible study methods, which I learned from professor Dr. Howard Hendricks: observation, interpretation, and application. By adopting these methods, you will come away with a better understanding of the Bible so that you can put it to use in your every-day life.

This course can be completed at one sitting, although you will probably want to reflect upon each lesson plan. The course materials contain audio lectures accompanied with interactive transcripts, which are located in the right-hand sidebar, underneath the "Extras" tab. Make sure to click on the hyperlinks contained within the transcripts.

My hope is this course will encourage you to explore more deeply what the Bible says. I know you will be encouraged by what God has to say to you through His Word. He loves you and has a great plan for your life.

Introduction From Matt Rodriguez
01:52

Bible Fun is a big deal!

Do you make decisions without guidance? Do you wish you had a road map to help you navigate your life? Or are you like most of us who rely on the advice of friends and personal preferences?

Tired of wishy-washy decision making and need something more reliable? If so, the Bible will provide the guidance you have been searching for. And this course will help you learn how to observe, interpret, and apply God’s Word to your life.

If you’re like most, the Bible collects dust on your bookshelf. It seems old, out-of-touch, and dry. How can something written thousands of years ago relate to me? These valid questions demand a response. This course will address these concerns.

Or how about time? Do you find yourself beat-tired at the end of your workday? Does the thought of waking up earlier to read the Bible make you noxious? Our modern pace of life seems to make Bible reading impossible but this course will help you make the most of your time.

Perhaps you question the accuracy of the Bible. Is what we have reliable or are there contradictions? How can we be sure the books of the Bible we currently have reflect the words of the original authors who penned them? This course will help put to rest these reservations.

The Bible is God’s Word to You

Have you ever questioned if God was listening to you? Ever want a response from Him? Ever pray but don’t get answers?

Did you know God wants to speak with you through His Word, the Bible. That’s right. The Bible is God’s primary way of talking with you. It’s His way to give you answers to your questions.

Some may think the Bible is old. Like some stale bread, they find old testament regulations out of touch with reality. But a look at the Bible reveals it is actually living and active (Heb 4:12). It’s wisdom and instructions are up-to-date and current.

And the Bible’s principles and guidance have stood the test of time. They are not a fad. Like a mature redwood in Big Sur, Scripture towers above all other sources of self-help. The Bible points us toward heaven, toward God. It’s His Word to us.

The Bible is inspired by God (2 Tim 3:16-17). It is God-breathed. It’s not a collection of ancient rambling by smart people, but a treasure trove of truths from God Himself. He speaks to us through His biblical writers. He uses messengers to deliver answers to questions we have about who He is, who we are, and how we are to connect with Him and each other.

What's the Big Deal?
03:20

There are dangers in neglecting God’s Word

“Moses my servant is dead. Get ready!” the LORD said to Joshua. Have you ever wondered what it must have felt like to be the new leader of God’s people, Israel? That’s the situation Joshua embraced as he obeyed God’s Word to lead His people to the promised land.

For those who’ve lead others, you know the difficulty of guiding people. Joshua would have faced this challenge while leading the Israelites. Remember, the Israelites descended from Jacob—the heel-grabber who deceived his father Isaac and stole his brother Esau’s birthright (Gen 27). It’s no wonder why Jacob, later named Israel, fathered a people (i.e. the Israelites) the Bible describes as stiff-necked (Exo 32:9).

Neglecting the LORD’s commandments (Exo 20), the Israelites fashioned a golden idol at Mount Sinai. They disobeyed God’s very first command: “You shall have no other gods before me.” Instead of listening to God, the Israelites used their gold earrings to mold a calf. “These are your gods, O Israel…” they said.

So when Moses died, Joshua found himself in charge of leading these stiff-necked Israelites. “How am I gonna get these stubborn people to listen to me?” Joshua likely said to himself. “C’mon God, give me some help here!”

Ever felt like Joshua? “C’mon God, these people won’t listen!” “They won’t do what I say!” Every leader has shrugged these same thoughts while encountering opposition. People, like you and me, are stiff-necked. We neglect what God says. We neglect God’s Word.

It’s no wonder why the LORD provides Joshua a little tip:

Make sure you are very strong and brave! Carefully obey all the law my servant Moses charged you to keep! Do not swerve from it to the right or to the left, so that you may be successful in all you do. This law scroll must not leave your lips! You must memorize it day and night so you can carefully obey all that is written in it. Then you will prosper and be successful. (Joshua 1:78 NET)

Joshua was to treasure God’s Word, if he wanted to be successful.

Do you also want success? Do you want to lead others with wisdom? Do you find yourself questioning whether you have what it takes? If so, you are in familiar company. We all need help. We all need His help.

Rather than neglecting the Bible, consider treasuring God’s Word like Joshua. Obey it, don’t swerve from it, memorize it. Then you will prosper and be successful in carrying out God’s will for your life.

Scripture and/or notes quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NET) are from the NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://bible.org All rights reserved.

Dangers of Neglect
02:51
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Where Do We Begin?
2 Lectures 04:10

Ask these four questions!

Ever wonder why some people appear to get more out of a Bible passage than you do? They seem to identify more details. Perhaps, their take on a verse is a little more balanced and refined.

So how’d they do it? Why do others find it easier to interpret Scripture? Is there guidance that can help you get better with understanding the Bible?

One reason others may get more out of Scripture is because they have learned the key to Bible observation. Observation answers the question, “What do I see?” It doesn’t ask, “What does it mean?” or “How can it help me?” Instead, Bible observation uncovers details that you may have previously glanced over.

So the first step in observing is to ask the four W’s: Who? What? Where? and When? “Who is mentioned in this passage?” “What terms does the author use in this verse?” “Where is this person from?” or “What time of day is this action happening?” Asking these four W’s help you observe what the author is saying. They help you identify important clues along the way.

Ask the Four W's
01:20

Compare your translations!

Ever wonder why we have numerous translations of the Bible? Why does one translation differ from others. Which translation accurately reflects the words of the original authors? Or are there multiple reliable ones?

Many of us get frustrated with sifting through questions like this. We want to know which translation is the best. We feel uncomfortable with acknowledging multiple translations may offer a reliable interpretation. To us, we see different translations as problematic—not advantageous.

But the reality is most good translations, such as the New International Version, New American Standard Bible, or New English Translation employ a host of experts in Hebrew and Koine Greek. These translators have gained the respect of the academic community for their fine scholarship in accurately interpreting the Masoretic and Koine texts.

So why does the NET interpret passages differently than the NIV? The simple reason is because we don’t have the original writers of Scripture alive to explain what they wrote! Instead, Bible interpreters rely on the best manuscripts available to them. And because the Bible was originally written a long time ago, cultural and language differences make it challenging to figure out the original meaning of Bible passages.

But this doesn’t mean translation is impossible. Instead, linguists use their expertise in making educated decisions on what certain ancient terms and phrases mean. For example, the Hebrew term Har carries the meaning of a mountain, hill, or hill country. Because there are multiple meanings associated with this one term, translators must decide which interpretation best fits the biblical author’s original meaning. In doing so, linguists choose which interpretation they believe the ancient author meant.

At first glance, this sounds problematic. “Which one is it, mountain, hill or hill country?” we mumble. “Why can’t there be only one term?” But once we trust the scholarship behind each good Bible translation, we can utilize the different translations to our benefit. By comparing translations with each other, we can see how each translation surfaces different nuances. And in doing this exercise, we get a more balanced view of the range of meanings a certain passage may contain.

So go for it! Get a few different translations. And when you read a difficult passage, consult one of your other translations to see another perspective. In doing so, you’ll gain a better understanding of what the Bible means.

Pick Several Translations
02:50
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Method 1: Begin With Observation
3 Lectures 07:12

Observe before interpreting!

If you’re like me, you probably read a Bible verse and then jump to the question, “What does it mean?” Let’s face it, we all want to know the meaning of what we’re reading. So we glance over the text and jump into interpretation.

But after reading the Bible, how many pause and ask, “What do I see?” before “What does it mean?” Asking “What do I see?” uncovers important details, which prove essential to figuring out what the verse means. Without discovering what we see in a verse, we can’t expect to know what the verse means. And without understanding what the verse means, we can’t expect to apply the verse to our lives.

So the first step in Bible study, is observation. In his famous Bible Exposition class, Dr. Howard Hendricks asks his students to make a list of observations taken from Acts 1:8. My wife and I had the privilege of taking this class and doing this exercise.

Just as an athlete must exercise his muscles, observing Acts 1:8 takes hard work. After about 30 observations, your mind becomes tired. But if you keep at it, you’ll observe more details that you previously missed. And the more details you observe, the more interesting Acts 1:8 becomes. Let’s take a look.

But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the farthest parts of the earth.” (Acts 1:8 NET)

The first observation you encounter is the contrastive conjunction “but.” Because it is contrastive, you then need to ask, “What comes before Acts 1:8?” So you read Acts 1:1–7 to understand the context of Acts 1:8.

The second observation you’ll notice is the second person pronoun “you.” So you ask, “Who is the author referencing?” “Is it one person or a group of people?” Because you’ve already read Acts 1:1–7, you’ll see the author, Luke, speaks of “you” as being the apostles (vv. 2–3).

As you observe important details in the verse, you begin to discover important clues. But if you jump straight from reading to asking, “What does this mean?” you fail to uncover important clues, which may affect the meaning of the verse. So before you jump into finding the meaning of what you read, pause and observe. Ask yourself, “What do I see?” In doing so, you’ll likely come to a better interpretation of what the verse means.

Scripture and/or notes quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NET) are from the NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://bible.org All rights reserved.

Observe Before Interpreting the Bible
02:36

Identify the context!

Ever come across verses such as “And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away…” (Mt 18:9), “As he [Elisha] was traveling up the road, some young boys came out of the city and made fun of him, saying, ‘Go on up, baldy! Go on up, baldy!’” (2 Kg 2:23), or “Your stature is like a palm tree, and your breasts are like clusters of grapes” (Song 7:7) and wondered, “What’s that about?”

Or perhaps you talk with a friend who mentions a so-called discrepancy in the Bible and wondered, “They do have a point.” For example, Proverbs 26:4–5 appears to offer contradictory advice: “Do not answer a fool according to his folly, lest you yourself also be like him. Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own estimation.” So which is it? Answer a fool, or not!

Encountering difficult verses like these mentioned above will provide road bumps in our spiritual journeys if we don’t consider the context. We must ask, “What comes before this verse?” and “What follows?” Without asking these, we run the risk of coming to wrong interpretations.

In fact, many religions make this error. They rip Scripture out of context to support their weird beliefs. Jehovah’s Witnesses, in their New World Translation, interpret John 1:1 to support their claim that Jesus was “a god” rather than “God” because of the lack of a definite article (i.e. “the”) in the verse.

Tragically, Jehovah’s Witnesses fail to ask, “What follows this verse?” If they did, they would notice that just thirteen verses later it says this “Word” refers to Jesus (Jn 1:14). And we know John’s purpose statement for writing was, “… so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name” (Jn 20:31). Remember to identify the context when reading Scripture.

Types of Context

In their book, Living by the Book, Howard and William Hendricks identify five types of context (pg. 227–28). Literary context asks, “What words come before and after?” Historical context, “When is this occurring?” Cultural context, “What was the situation like?” Geographic context, “Where did this happen?” And theological context, “What was the writer’s relationship with God like?”

So when you read the Bible and feel puzzled, identify the context of the verse. Figure out what verses come before and after. In doing so, you’ll come away with a better perspective on what this passage means.

Scripture and/or notes quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NET) are from the NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://bible.org All rights reserved.

Identify the Context
02:58

Reflect on words repeated!

Biblical authors use repeated terms or phrases like strategically placed signposts on a curved mountain road. They point us in the right direction. They warn us from dangers ahead. They remind us about which way we need to turn ahead.

But if you’re like me, you speed through reading your Bible verses for the day and often fail to recognize repeated terms and phrases. You overlook important signs the author posted to make his point. Whizzing by, you don’t identify these special markers and road signs in the biblical text.

Take Hebrews 11, how many times is the word faith mentioned? Twenty-five! You’d think the author was trying to grab our attention with all these references to faith.

Imagine driving on a highway and seeing twenty-five road signs for a rest stop a few miles down the road. Twenty-five of them. I’d bet you’d at least think, “What’s the big deal about this place?” And some of us might even exit the highway to see what’s so special about this rest stop. Perhaps they have a Dairy Queen or In-N-Out or something else fun.

So the next time you are studying the Scriptures, look for repeated words and phrases. These are like road signs along a highway. They point you in the direction the author wants you to go.

Now faith is being sure of what we hope for, being convinced of what we do not see (Hebrews 11:1 NET). May you, as readers of God’s Word, be encouraged in your faith as you reflect upon repeated words and phrases that you do see.

Scripture and/or notes quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NET) are from the NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://bible.org All rights reserved.

Reflect on Words Repeated
01:38
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Method 2: Follow With Interpretation
2 Lectures 06:29

Interpret before applying!

We’ve all done it. Read a verse and then jumped over to how it applies to our lives. Forgetting to lay the foundation by asking “What do I see?” (observation) and then, “What does that verse mean?” (interpretation). Instead, we often go straight for the gold—“How does this help my dilemma?” (application).

Does it matter what order we do it—whether we start with observation or start with interpretation? Or maybe begin with application and then move into interpretation? Or maybe we start with all three questions at the same time. Can we still end up with the same understanding of Scripture, no matter which order we ask these foundational questions?

Take building a house for example. Does it matter if we begin with laying the framework before the concrete foundation? Or can we assemble the roof prior to framing the walls? Or can we do all three at the same time? Does the order in which we construct a house matter?

Yes! Of course order matters. Just like order matters in how we approach Bible study. It would be foolish to read a passage and then create an application without first observing important clues and then interpreting the meaning of the passage.

Take Matthew 5:29, “If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away! It is better to lose one of your members than to have your whole body thrown into hell.” If I jumped straight to application, I wouldn’t be able to write this blog post because my eye would be in the garbage. So yes, order of Bible study does matter!

Let’s tackle this verse in proper order. First, I observed the context of this verse falls within Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. It is part of a series of lessons. And a careful investigation of 5:28 reveals Jesus is addressing matters of the heart. This helps us understand Jesus isn’t advocating self-mutilation by tearing out our eyes. Instead, Jesus cares about whether we’re serious about rooting out sinful behaviors, such as lust, which originate from a sinful heart. So rather than jumping from reading to application, commit to a systematic approach: Observation “What do I see?”, Interpretation “What does it mean?”, and then Application “How does it work?”

Scripture and/or notes quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NET) are from the NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://bible.org All rights reserved.

Interpret Before Applying the Bible
02:57

Identify timeless truth!

At my mom’s home in Gardena, California, hangs a valuable wall clock. It’s the kind with fancy wood and a real wind-up spring. And every hour it ding-dongs to remind us of its presence. And with time its value has increased.

This wall clock, although important, often gets overlooked. It just hangs out, keeping quiet for the better part of each hour of the day. It is one of those furnishings we rush by without paying any attention to. That is until…

We need to be somewhere and are running late. During these fiascos, we jerk our head toward the clock to gauge the time, calculate how late we’re running, and then we rush out the back door.

Now suppose we open our Bible and rush through reading a chapter without stopping to see what its timeless truth is? What if we fail to grab the author’s main point? What if we miss that advice which works well in all generations and proves worthy in all of life’s circumstances?

Identifying the timeless truth proves crucial. It gives us greater perspective on life. It teaches us about God’s character. It guards us from misinterpreting His Word by giving us an eternal perspective.

So how do you find the timeless truth in a Bible passage?

First, start with a paragraph of Scripture, which is the basic building block of Bible study. Read a paragraph and ask yourself, “What does this say about the character of God?” And “How does this fit with other Bible verses?” Asking these questions will prompt you to view this text from a larger vantage point.

Next, ask yourself how this paragraph fits within the book’s chapter? At this point, you can compare your proposed interpretation to see if it meshes with what the whole chapter says. Your timeless truth statement should fit within what the chapter argues or states. If not, you may need to revisit that paragraph in light of the chapter.

For example, take the challenging verse in Philippians 2:7 where Paul says Christ emptied Himself. By reading the verse alone, one can misinterpret that Paul is claiming the timeless truth is that Jesus was not divine since He emptied Himself of divine privileges. But this interpretation misses Paul’s point.

So we read verse seven in light of the paragraph, which begins with verse one and ends with eleven. This paragraph argues for unity. That we should look out for others’ interests. And then Paul gives us the example of Christ who exampled how to sacrificially serve others. And in serving, Christ united Himself to His Father’s will. Jesus and the Father were united just as we are to be united with other Christians.

From this, we learn the timeless truth that Jesus is united with the Father’s will. We also learn Jesus is humble and a servant. But lest we minimize Jesus to a non-divine man, we learn He will receive our confession of His Lordship to His Father’s glory.

Identify the Timeless Truth
03:32
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Method 3: Finish With Application
2 Lectures 05:28

Application for transformation

In the famous chapter discussing the value of Scripture, the psalmist writes, “Open my eyes so I can truly see the marvelous things in your law!” (119:18). The psalmist recognizes the Bible contains incredible gems. But if the psalmist only saw marvelous things, he’d miss out on the last step of Bible study—application.

I often find myself reading Scripture to check it off my spiritual disciplines list. “Ok, done.” I make sure to read at least an entire chapter so I can feel better—more spiritual.

Sometimes, I see something in the text that proves insightful. Like the psalmist, I see good stuff in God’s Word. This truth proves encouraging to my soul. It makes me feel secure. But if I stop there, I miss out on the reason for Bible study—application.

Having graduated from seminary in 2010, I have sat under the world’s most respected scholars. I’ve listened to their wisdom in the classroom. I’ve also read their books and gained invaluable knowledge. But often I see great truth without ever letting it move me to action. Instead, like a fat sponge, I soak up wisdom without ever using it to cleanse my soul.

In contrast, the psalmist commits to action. He writes, “Spare me shame and humiliation, for I observe your rules” (v 22). He obeys Yahweh’s rules. Notice he doesn’t make Scripture reading his end goal. Instead, the psalmist treasures God’s Word so he can do something—observe God’s rules. And not only that, observing God’s rules proves delightful to him for “they give me guidance” (v24).

So when we read Scripture, let’s remember the last step of Bible study—application. Apply what you learn. Let the Bible move you to action. Do something with it. Start out with small action steps. For then you’ll find great delight in observing God’s rules when you see they give practical guidance that works.

Scripture and/or notes quoted by permission. Quotations designated (NET) are from the NET Bible® copyright ©1996-2006 by Biblical Studies Press, L.L.C. http://bible.org All rights reserved.

Apply For Transformation
02:14

Learn within community!

We learn from others. We gain knowledge through our family, friends, coworkers, and teachers. Listening to their experiences and guidance provides wisdom. These people strengthen our thinking and challenge our biases. They help us learn. Without them, we wouldn’t.

Yet how many times do we read the Bible with others? How often do struggle together over difficult verses? How often do we discuss those—well—frustrating passages? The ones that we just don’t get but accept because everyone else seems to. How often do we invite others to help us learn God’s Word?

May I suggest we learn Scripture within the context of community?

“Ok, so what do I do?” you may ask. “It’s hard enough to read by myself. Now you wanna get me with others?”

If you’re like me, questions like these prove difficult. It feels like including others in my Bible reading proves lofty but unrealistic. The truth, however, is we must read the Bible in the context of community. Without others, we risk erring in how we apply Scripture to our lives!

Take church history for example. How many of us read the writings of our church fathers. Do we compare our Biblical opinions with those of our predecessors? If not, perhaps today would be a good time to start. These godly people have invaluable experience we can learn from. The writings of Augustine help us understand grace. His Confessions provide an intimate view of how he struggled with selfishness. (Something that you and me definitely don’t struggle with, right?)

Or how about church creeds? Did you know our Christian ancestors have already put together well-articulated statements of faith? These statements were not haphazardly put together but involved countless hours of Scripture interpretation in the context of community. So if you’re interested in what some very smart people have said about important topics such as who Jesus is, who the Holy Spirit is, and who you and me are, check out Creeds of the Churches: A Reader in Christian Doctrine from the Bible to the Present, edited by John H. Leith.

Or how about small groups? Meeting regularly with other Christian men or women encourages us to persevere in our Bible reading. They keep us accountable. The sage explains, “As iron sharpens iron, so a person sharpens his friend” (Prov. 27:17). Small groups provide a great way to let others help sharpen our Biblical understanding.

So let’s commit to community. Let’s read Scripture with others. Let’s talk about it with our friends. Let’s learn from what our Christian ancestors have to say about the Bible. And in doing so, we guard against misinterpreting and misapplying God’s Word in our lives.

Learn Within Community
03:14
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What Is Next?
5 Lectures 07:06

Teach what you learn!

You’ve grown in your Bible study abilities, so now what? You’ve learned how to observe key terms and phrases. You’ve practiced interpreting verses within their context. You’ve applied what you’ve learned to your own spiritual life. Now you’re ready for the next step in Bible study: teach others what you’ve learned!

Sure, teaching involves time, patience, and preparation. Lots of reading and thinking precede teaching. In a word, teaching requires grit. Like a cowboy on the ranch, teaching Bible study techniques to others brands them on their mind.

When we teach, we unrope the Scriptures to others. We loosen the difficulties others feel in approaching passages. We show them how to untangle hard-to-understand verses, one step at a time.

Paul encouraged Timothy to continue in the knowledge of Scripture he received (2 Tim 3:14). Having received Bible study training, Timothy was equipped to teach others. Rather than hording Bible knowledge, Timothy was to train others. Granted, not everyone has the gift of teaching like Timothy, but we all can share with others the Bible study tips we have learned.

Teach What You Learn
01:16

Bible Translations

The following Bible translations are well-written and will help you when comparing one translation to the other.

  • New International Version
  • New American Standard Version
  • New English Translation
  • New Living Translation
  • The Message
  • New King James Version

Bible Dictionaries, Concordances, and Background Materials

The following books provide tools that will help you unearth the original context from which the biblical authors were writing from.

  • Harper’s Bible Dictionary
  • Zondervan NIV Exhaustive Concordance (They also have a version for the NASB)
  • Archeology & the New Testament by McRay
  • An Introduction To the New Testament by Carson and Moo
  • Figures of Speech Used In the Bible by Bullinger
  • The Religious Context of Early Christianity by Klauck

Bible Study Methods

Here are some great books outlining how to study the Bible from a grammatical, historical, and literary approach.

  • Living By the Book by Howard and William Hendricks
  • Methodical Bible Study by Traina
  • The New Joy of Discovery in Bible Study by Wald
  • How to Read the Bible as Literature …and get more out of it by Ryken

Bible Commentaries

  • The Expositor’s Bible Commentary
  • The Bible Knowledge Commentary by Walvord and Zuck
  • New English Translation Study Notes
  • The MacArthur Study Bible Study Notes

Bible Original Language Tools (Advanced)

  • Novum Testamentum Graece (NA27)
  • Biblia Hebraica (BHS)
  • A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (BDAG)
  • The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (HALOT) by Koehler and Baumgartner
  • The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon

I hope you find these resources helpful as you have fun studying the Bible. May God bless you through reading His Words of encouragement written just for you!

Build Your Bible Resources Library
03:02

Free is always nice. And online is usually convenient. So when you have free online resources, you get a win-win situation. The following are some free online resources to help you continue to hone your Bible study skills.

For more resources, visit http://valuableresourceshub.webs.com/biblestudyaids.htm  This site offers a wonderful list of Bible materials. Thanks John for putting it together so we all can enjoy it.
Free Bible Study Online Resources
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For some of you who desire more Bible training, there are many exciting opportunities. Here are some classes you may consider attending (depending on where you live).

Consider Further Bible Training
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Thank you for taking this course on how to study the Bible. My prayer is that you will continue to grow in your knowledge and love of God. And that by reading and enjoying His Word, you will apply it's principles to your life.

The Bible is not a book to just study. It is living and active and should be applied in every life circumstance. So whether you're at work, school, or home, the Bible's timeless truths will help you make wise decisions that please God.

I would like to hear your feedback on this course. So if you have any comments, questions, or concerns, feel free to email them to info@rodriguez.la . Thanks again for taking this course. 

Sincerely, 

Matt Rodriguez

Read my blog at: www.mattrodriguez.org/blog

Encouragement From Matt Rodriguez
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About the Instructor
Matthew Rodriguez
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25 Students
1 Course
Dallas Theological Seminary Graduate with a ThM degree

Matt graduated from Dallas Theological Seminary with a ThM in Pastoral Ministry. Vocationally, he is the Lead Web Developer for the Volunteer Center of North Texas, which is a 501c3 non-profit in Dallas. Matt loves to blog about the Bible, technology, and art. He is happily married to his wife Malia and is the proud papa of two beautiful children, Nathaniel and Naomi. In his free time, Matt teaches a bible study class for his church's English Language Program. He also enjoys gardening, wood working, working out, reading, and cheesecake (but not in that order!)