Beyond Arduino, Part 2: Analog Input Output
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Beyond Arduino, Part 2: Analog Input Output

Learn how to actually interact with the analog world in your favorite microcontroller platform
4.9 (23 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
736 students enrolled
Last updated 11/2016
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $200 Discount: 95% off
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Includes:
  • 3 hours on-demand video
  • 1 Article
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Design analog hardware around your IoT applications
  • Design add-on analog circuitry for popular development boards such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi.
  • Understand how a microcontroller interacts with its supporting analog hardware
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • A development platform is recommended to get the most out of this course. Anything from Arduino to Raspberry Pi to the BASIC Stamp, TI Launchpad or NXP Freedom board will do. Even stand alone microcontrollers such as NXP s08, microchip PIC or TI MSP430 will do.
  • Some actuators and sensors, not necessarily designed to work with your development platform. Anything you'd like to experiment with, such as RC servos, LCD displays, temperature sensors, motors, accelerometers, optical encoders, potentiometers and so on.
  • Some basic knowledge of how to run your code in your development platform is assumed.
  • Some basic knowledge on electronics is assumed, such as Ohm's Law, Series and Parallel Circuits, Voltage, Current, and so on
Description

In this course you will learn that there's more to life than the Arduino Uno and that there's probably a better way to do what you've been doing with microcontrollers. Yes, Arduino is an excellent platform to get you started, but you will learn that Arduino is not part of the day to day electronics you use like your TV, microwave oven or car dashboard. 

Do you know how the analog interfacing elements in a microcontroller work? Well, you will learn that here. 

This is not exactly a hands-on course, not if you don't want it to be. There are no promises on the projects you’ll make because I won’t force you to build something you didn’t choose to. However, I strongly recommend that you code along. Several microcontroller development platforms are showcased, but you should follow the examples with your own microcontroller.

Who is the target audience?
  • Makers who have some experience with hardware and would like to learn how these circuits work with as few equations as possible.
  • Coders who were introduced to hardware through some development board popular in the Maker movement, such as the Raspberry Pi or Arduino (e.g. blinking an LED, reading push button input)
  • Beginners who would rather skip the boring theory and math, and dive into fun hands- on applications that move, light up and make sounds instead.
  • This course is not for advanced hardware designers or electrical engineers.
  • This is not an introductory Microcontroller course. You will not learn to use an Arduino board by taking this course.
  • This is not a theoretical electronics course. Some of the basics are covered but we won't study differential equations, transforms, or transfer functions.
Compare to Other Arduino Courses
Curriculum For This Course
70 Lectures
03:09:34
+
Introduction
2 Lectures 04:35

Instructor Introduction
00:54
+
What's an Amplifier, Anyway?
6 Lectures 13:11
What's an Amplifier?
01:42

A Time Plot
02:07

Modelling an Amplifier with a 2-port System
01:45

Dependent Sources
02:45

Desired Parameters
03:16

Where do Dependent sources get their Power from?
01:36
+
Operational Amplifier Basics
5 Lectures 16:54
What's an OpAmp?
03:09

Internal OpAmp Model
02:42

Ideal OpAmp Characteristics
03:12

Typical OpAmp Characteristics
03:28

Some views of the 741
04:23
+
OpAmps as Comparators
9 Lectures 24:58
The Question it Answers
02:09

The Saturation Voltages
02:15

The Open Loop Gain
04:30

Comparator Example #1: A Potentiometer
02:58

Comparator Example #2: A Light Sensor
02:01

Not TTL Levels
03:59

Adding a Comparator
03:28

Output Plot
02:05

+
OpAmps as Inverting Amplifiers
6 Lectures 09:29
Negative Feedback
01:58

High Input Impedance
00:49

KCL Node Analysis
01:29

Virtual Ground
03:18

Punchline with Some Algebra
01:06

Recap and Key Ideas
00:49
+
Inverting Amplifier Analysis
3 Lectures 11:44
Two Port Networks
03:43

The Voltage Gain
03:27

The rest of the Parameters
04:34
+
Digital to Analog Converters
9 Lectures 31:04
Let's Recall Some Stuff
01:30

Digital to Analog Conversion
04:48

Pulse Width Modulation
05:22

The Usual DAC Pinout
01:43

The Binary Weighted DAC
06:46

The R-2R DAC
02:50

R-2R DAC Circuit Analysis, Part 1
02:10

R-2R DAC Circuit Analysis Punchline
03:23

R-2R DAC Advantages
02:32
+
Analog to Digital Converters
7 Lectures 22:46
Let's Recall Some Stuff
02:02

Analog to Digital Conversion
03:09

Analog to Digital Conversion Example
02:42

Encoding
03:15

Flash ADC
04:50

Flash ADC Example
02:52

Flash ADC Details
03:56
+
The Successive Approximation Analog to Digital Converter
7 Lectures 18:05
Successive Approximation Analog to Digital Converter
01:01

How it Works
02:42

The Successive Approximation Register
01:23

SAR Example, part 1
02:31

SAR Example, part 2
05:27

Breaking the 4th Wall
01:41

A Time Diagram
03:20
3 More Sections
About the Instructor
Eduardo Corpeño
4.4 Average rating
148 Reviews
1,776 Students
5 Courses
Electrical & Computer Engineer

I'm an Electrical and Computer Engineer. I've been teaching Electrical and Computer Engineering at undergraduate and graduate for over 10 years now. 

I love hardware, software and teaching.

I have 5 courses on Udemy so far, one on a technique to solve engineering problems easily, and a series of 4 courses (so far) on the electronics and algorithms behind microcontroller platforms.

Among the subjects in the classes I teach on campus, my strongest are Electrical Circuit Theory, Electronic Devices, Digital Design, Computer Architecture, Microcontrollers, Assembly and C Programming for Embedded Applications, Hardware Description Language, Field Programmable Gate Arrays, Artificial Intelligence, Printed Circuit Board Design and Real Time Operating Systems.

Along with two of my finest colleagues, I created one of the first MOOCs in spanish, an introduction to the Raspberry Pi. We wrote a conference paper on the outcome of this very successful course. 

I recently got a Master of Science in Computer Science at Georgia Tech and I loved every minute of it.

Marissa Siliezar
4.4 Average rating
148 Reviews
1,776 Students
5 Courses
Telecom Engineer

Telecom Engineer passionate about new technologies and my family. The general background I have revolves around value added services in mobile services and also product marketing for a major brand of mobile devices. When it comes to hardware design I came across various developer platforms when designing my bachelor's thesis. After 6+ years of experience I became a mommy to my dear Ignacio and a stay at home mommy.