Beginner Guitar Lessons - Your Complete Foundation Course
4.5 (32 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
299 students enrolled
Wishlisted Wishlist

Please confirm that you want to add Beginner Guitar Lessons - Your Complete Foundation Course to your Wishlist.

Add to Wishlist

Beginner Guitar Lessons - Your Complete Foundation Course

From beginner through Intermediate. All of the information that anybody needs to know.
4.5 (32 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
299 students enrolled
Last updated 7/2016
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $60 Discount: 83% off
5 hours left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 18.5 hours on-demand video
  • 22 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • This is a complete foundation course which teaches the right stuff in the right order at the right pace. Perfect for beginners, intermediate players with gaps in their knowledge, or anybody with a desire to finally learn to play the guitar properly. There are very few more experienced teachers and musicians than Bobby Harrison and Nick Radcliffe.
  • Learn to play the guitar to a good level and fully understand everything you are playing while developing your ear for music!
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • What do you need? A guitar!!
Description

The Frethub Foundation Course for contemporary guitar - taught by top UK session guitarists Bobby Harrison and Nick Radcliffe - is a crash-course that we hope will get you playing well in a relatively short space of time, since we’ve cut out any unnecessary exercises and just kept the valuable stuff. Whether you’re into rock, metal, country, blues or jazz, the techniques and approaches presented in these lessons apply to all styles of modern music. We teach you all of the essential chords, scales and techniques you need to be able to play in a band, write your own songs or to simply make good music at home. You don’t need to be able to read music to learn with FretHub and we’ve even cut out the need to read guitar Tab, since everything is explained thoroughly, in a note-for-note fashion. 

PLEASE NOTE: The Promo video for this course is designed to represent all of our courses available on this website. However our Foundation course should prepare you sufficiently to be able to tackle the more advanced techniques on display, so why not give us a try and most importantly....have fun!

Who is the target audience?
  • If you can already play, why not dive in half way through? The course is neatly broken down so you can choose the start level for your ability and there should be plenty to gain from the lessons.
  • If you are already a Guitar God but feel there might be the tiniest room for improvement, we have plenty of other courses to suit you!
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
162 Lectures
18:32:19
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 1
18 Lectures 01:41:43

The FretHub Foundation Course for Contemporary Guitar is a fresh and comprehensive course of guitar lessons weighing in at over 18 hours of video tuition, from two highly qualified and respected teachers with over 50 years of combined professional experience.

Our guitar lessons are taught in a down-to-earth manner and presented in a logical and progressive order, providing the consistency and familiarity you get from taking guitar lessons with a private tutor.

Our aim is to give you a solid foundation and equip you with the necessary tools to learn, recognise and employ the guitar techniques and tricks that are used in the making of the music you love.

From beginners through to intermediate players, this course has everything you need to help you on your journey to become, not just a good guitar player, but a great all round musician

Preview 01:29

In this first series of videos, Bobby and Nick take you from never before having picked up a guitar to being able to play some classic songs in just a few short lessons.
You will learn: The anatomy of the guitar and the names of the open strings; lots of essential chords and how to change between them; how to strum, plus many popular chord progressions and classic songs. Remember, you get out what you put in, so be sure to practice regularly. However, when you’re starting out learning guitar, it’s natural to experience some soreness in your fingertips. Please do not play through pain. If you feel discomfort at any point, please stop. Rest assured your fingertips will soon toughen up.

Before we learn anything on the guitar, it’s important that you know the anatomy of the instrument. Here, in our first video lesson, Bobby and Nick show you the main types of electric and acoustic guitars and give you a basic run down of what everything’s called and what its function is.

Preview 08:01

Now we’re going to look at the six open strings and learn their names.

2. Naming The Strings
01:43

Now that we know the names of the strings, it’s important that you learn how to keep your guitar in tune. In this video, Bobby shows you how to alter the pitch of the open strings using the guitar’s machineheads. As explained in this lesson, it’s recommended that you keep the “Tuning Notes” video open in a separate tab when studying with Frethub. This will give you a reference for when you feel your guitar needs re-tuning.

Incidentally, Bobby is a left-handed guitarist. To make his lessons easier for most people to follow, we decided to horizontally flip his videos when we edited them. However, we left this lesson un-flipped in order to avoid confusion when Bobby goes on to demonstrate several electronic guitar tuners and apps later in the video.

2a. Tuning Your Guitar
07:44

In this lesson, Nick shows us the E and A minor chords. These two chords are similar in shape, so it’s a great place to start as we can practice changing between the two and begin making music straight away.

3. Introducing Chords 1 (E & Am)
10:37

Using the E and A minor chords we learned in the previous lesson, we’re now going to look at strumming and changing between the two chords.

4. Changing Between Chords & Strumming
08:57

Next, Nick shows us the chord of C. It’s fairly easy to change between the chords of C and A minor.

5. Introducing Chords 2 (C)
02:52

Now that we know three chords, we can practice changing between them with very musical results. Nick shows you how.

6. Changing Between Chords 2
02:51

Now it's time to learn another new chord: The very commonly used open chord of D.

7. Introducing Chords 3 (D)
01:28

In this lesson, we learn yet another very commonly used chord: The chord of G.

8. Introducing Chords 4 (G)
02:12

With five chords under already our belts, we’re well on our way to playing some great guitar! In this video, Nick gives you some tips on changing between all five chords.

9. Changing Between Chords 3
02:48

In this lesson, we learn yet another very commonly used chord: The chord of A.

10. Introducing Chords 5 (A)
02:40

Now it’s time to learn our first song as Bobby shows you how to play the 1960s classic, “Wild Thing”. This song features the chords of A, D and E and will serve as a valuable exercise to improve your chord changes.

11. 1st Song – Wild Thing
07:11

Using the same chords Bobby showed you in “Wild Thing”, we’re now going to learn a 12 bar blues in the key of A. This will further improve your chord changes and you’ll also learn a new and effective strumming pattern.

12. 12 Bar Blues In A
06:46

In this lesson, Bobby shows us how to play the classic song “Hey Joe”, made famous by Jimi Hendrix. This song is based around just five chords. Once again, it serves as a fantastic exercise for improving both our chord changes and our strumming.

13. Five Chord Song – Hey Joe
06:46

In this lesson, Bobby introduces us to a new chord: The chord of E minor. We’re going to learn a very popular four chord sequence that features in countless classic songs. If you’re interested in songwriting, you can even take this chord progression and come up with a song of your own.

14. Popular 4 Chord Sequence
06:02

Over the next 2 lessons, Nick shows us some very useful strumming patterns and techniques. These patterns are used in countless songs and also work very well if you want to write your own songs too.

15. Learning To Strum 1
13:24

In this lesson, Nick continues to shows us some very useful strumming patterns and techniques. These patterns are used in countless songs and also work very well if you want to write your own songs too.

16. Learning To Strum 2
08:12
+
The FretHub Foundation Course - Level 2
15 Lectures 02:00:37

In this second series of lessons, Nick and Bobby introduce us to many more exciting techniques and ideas to further improve our guitar playing.
Subjects covered include: The 1st position chords of D minor and F; Power chords; Palm muting; Rock n’ roll/Blues 12 bar shuffle riffs; Finding the notes on the neck and some classic riffs and songs including: “The House Of The Rising Sun”; “Everybody Hurts”; “You Really Got Me”; “All The Small Things” and “Save Tonight”.

In this first lesson, Nick teaches us yet another very commonly used chord: The chord of F.

1. Introducing Chords 6 (F)
02:17

Now that we know the chord of F, we can learn another classic song. In this lesson, Nick shows us how to play The Animals version of “The House Of The Rising Sun”.
This is a great song to practice as it will also improve your picking hand technique.

2. Song – House Of The Rising Sun
13:12

Another song that will improve both your chord changes and your picking hand technique is the REM classic “Everybody Hurts”. In this lesson, Nick shows us how to play the intro, verse and chorus sections of this great song.

3. Song – Everybody Hurts
11:28

Now it’s time to learn Power Chords. Learning these shapes will open a lot of doors for your riff playing, since power chords are used in countless classic songs. In this lesson, Nick also shows us how to play The Kinks classic “You Really Got Me”. The Kinks are often credited with introducing the overdriven, power chord-based riff to mainstream audiences and paving the way for the rock bands of the late 60s, 70’s 80’s and beyond.

4. Power Chords and Riffs
13:02

Another song that uses power chords to great effect is the 2004 U2 classic “Vertigo”. In this lesson, Bobby shows us the main riff from the song. This is a great riff to practice since it will improve the speed at which we change from one power chord to the next.

5. Power Chord Riff – Vertigo
04:35

In this lesson, Bobby introduces us to palm muting. This technique is common in all kinds of music and used to great effect by many rock, metal and punk bands as it’s an effective way of altering dynamics within songs. Bobby shows you the technique, using the intro section of the Foo Fighters classic “All My Life”, as well as parts of “All The Small Things” by Blink 182.

6. Introducing Palm Muting
04:27

As promised in the previous lesson, we’re now going to learn the verse and chorus riffs from “All The Small Things” by Blink 182. This is a great song to practice if we want to improve our palm muting, dynamics and power chord changes.

7. Song – All The Small Things
10:19

Over the next two lessons, Nick shows us some essential rock ‘n’ roll/blues 12 bar shuffle riffs that feature in countless classic songs. Nick also demonstrates different variations of grooves and how to add palm muting to create dynamics.

8. 12 Bar Rock ‘n’ Roll Riff pt1
09:42

In this lesson, Nick continues to show us some essential rock ‘n’ roll/blues 12 bar shuffle riffs that feature in countless classic songs. Nick also demonstrates different variations of grooves and how to add palm muting to create dynamics.

9. 12 Bar Rock ‘n’ Roll Riff pt2
03:38

In this lesson, Nick teaches us the chord of D minor and shows us a cool chord sequence that features three minor chords. This chord progression will help us practice our changes. If you’re a songwriter, you could even try taking these minor chords and coming up with your own original composition.

10. Introducing Chords 7 (Dm)
04:26

In this video, Bobby teaches us the Eagle Eye Cherry hit “Save Tonight”. This song features just four chords throughout, including the chord of F. Not only will learning this song be great pratice for our chord changes, but it will also improve our strumming. Bobby also demonstrates several other well known songs that share this same chord progression. If you’re a songwriter, you could try taking these four chords and coming up with your own original composition.

11. 4 Chord Song – Save Tonight
11:18

Over the next four lessons, Bobby teaches us the notes on the neck. It’s essential at this point, for the progress of your playing, that we at least know how to find the notes on the low E and the A strings as this will allow us to locate the roots of power chords and later, barre chords, scales, riffs and much more. Bobby takes us through each note, step by step, so that it’s easy to follow. We also have available on this website an intensive course named “Learning The Neck” that explores this subject deeper. Think of these four short lessons as a kind of “Learning The Neck Lite”, since they contain as much information as you need at this point to navigate your way around the fretboard.

12. Finding Notes On The Neck 1
07:58

In this lesson, Bobby continues to teach us the notes on the neck. It’s essential at this point, for the progress of our playing, that we at least know how to find the notes on the low E and the A strings as this will allow us to locate the roots of power chords and later, barre chords, scales, riffs and much more. Bobby takes us through each note, step by step, so that it’s easy to follow. We also have available on this website an intensive course named “Learning The Neck” that explores this subject deeper. Think of these four short lessons as a kind of “Learning The Neck Lite”, since they contain as much information as you need at this point to navigate your way around the fretboard.

13. Finding Notes On The Neck 2
04:55

In this lesson, Bobby continues to teach us the notes on the neck. It’s essential at this point, for the progress of our playing, that we at least know how to find the notes on the low E and the A strings as this will allow us to locate the roots of power chords and later, barre chords, scales, riffs and much more. Bobby takes us through each note, step by step, so that it’s easy to follow. We also have available on this website an intensive course named “Learning The Neck” that explores this subject deeper. Think of these four short lessons as a kind of “Learning The Neck Lite”, since they contain as much information as you need at this point to navigate your way around the fretboard.

14. Finding Notes On The Neck 3
04:28

In this lesson, Bobby continues to teach us the notes on the neck. It’s essential at this point, for the progress of our playing, that we at least know how to find the notes on the low E and the A strings as this will allow us to locate the roots of power chords and later, barre chords, scales, riffs and much more. Bobby takes us through each note, step by step, so that it’s easy to follow. Elsewhere on this website, there’s an intensive course-within-a-course named “Learning The Neck” that explores this subject deeper. Think of these four short lessons as a kind of “Learning The Neck Lite”, since they contain as much information as you need at this point to navigate your way around the fretboard.

15. Finding Notes On The Neck 4
14:52
+
The FretHub Foundation Course - Level 3
16 Lectures 01:42:46

In this third series of lessons, Bobby and Nick take your playing to new heights, introducing you to more exciting techniques and ideas.
You will learn: alternate picking; great picking exercises to improve left and right hand co-ordination; how to tune your guitar by ear; dominant 7 chords; major and minor bar (or barre) chords and many classic songs.

In the first four lessons of Level 3, we’re going to concentrate on alternate picking. Bobby breaks down this technique step by step, allowing you to pick as efficiently and accurately as possible.

Preview 03:30

First, we isolate the picking hand, making sure we’re holding the pick correctly for maximum efficiency when using alternate picking.

2. Introducing Picking Part 2
09:57

Next, we learn a very useful linear chromatic exercise that incorporates alternate picking. This exercise is designed to improve co-ordination between both hands and will serve you well as a warm up routine for many years to come.

3. Introducing Picking Part 3
12:34

Next, we learn another very useful chromatic exercise that incorporates alternate picking. Again, this exercise is designed to improve co-ordination between both hands and will serve you well as a warm up routine for many years to come.

4. Introducing Picking Part 4
06:02

In this video, Nick explains relative tuning. Using this tried and tested technique, you’ll always be able to keep your guitar in tune without the aid of a tuner.

5. Relative Tuning
04:19

In this lesson, Bobby shows you the main riff, verse and chorus parts from Green Day’s “American Idiot”. As well as featuring a great riff, this song serves as a very useful exercise to practice quick changes between power chords.

6. Power Chords – American Idiot
13:01

Here, Nick shows you the Dominant 7 chords of G7, C7, A7, D7, E7 and B7. These are very common chords and essential to know, since they crop up in countless classic songs.

7. Dominant 7 Chords
07:37

Now we’ve learnt some Dominant 7 chords, we can practice some common chord changes.

8. Changing Between Chords 4
02:49

So far, we’ve covered 1st position chords incorporating open strings and power chords. By now, your hands should be strong enough to learn bar chords (or “Barre” chords). In this lesson, Nick shows you the 2 main barre chord shapes that will enable you to play major chords all over the neck. You may feel some strain in your wrist or hand, so please don’t play though pain, but rest assured, barre chords get easier with regular yet careful practice. Using the tips you learned in the “Finding Notes On The Neck” videos in the last module, it should be easy for you to locate your root notes and move these 2 barre chord shapes up and down, creating new chords. Try putting 2 or 3 barre chords together to create your own chord progressions, riffs or even whole songs.

9. Barre Chords
05:05

In this video, Nick shows you the main riff from the Nirvana classic “Smells Like Teen Spirit”. As well as being a classic riff, it’s a great way to practice your barre chords, since it features the 2 major barre chord shapes we learned in the previous lesson.

10. Riff – Smells Like Teen Spirit
03:27

In this lesson, Nick shows you the 2 main minor barre chord shapes that will enable you to play minor chords all over the neck. You may feel some strain in your wrist or hand, so please don’t play though pain, but rest assured, barre chords get easier with regular yet careful practice. Using the tips we learned in the “Finding Notes On The Neck” videos in the last module, it should be easy for you to locate your root notes and move these 2 barre chord shapes up and down, creating new chords. Try putting 2 or 3 barre chords together (including the major shapes you already know) to create your own chord progressions, riffs or even whole songs. Knowing these shapes will also open the doors to learning many more classic songs.

11. Minor Barre Chords
02:46

A great song to practice changing between barre chords and moving them around the neck is the 1978 Undertones classic “Teenage Kicks”. In this lesson, Bobby shows you the main riff, verse, chorus and outro of the song.

12. Song – Teenage Kicks
11:34

Another great song to practice changing between barre chords is “Molly’s Chambers” by Kings Of Leon. In this video, Bobby shows you the main riff, verse and chorus parts.

13. Song – Molly’s Chambers
07:23

In this short lesson, Bobby shows us how to play the Bob Dylan classic “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door”. This great song features just four first position chords that you should already know.

14. Song – Knockin’ On Heavens Door
01:32

In this lesson, Bobby shows us how to play the Tom Petty classic “Learning To Fly”. Again, this great song features just four first position chords that you should already know.

15. Song – Learning To Fly
01:32

In this lesson, Nick shows us how to play the Neil Young classic “Heart Of Gold”. There are more chord changes in this song than in previous songs we’ve learned, but you should find it fairly easy if you’ve practiced your first positon chords.

16. Song – Heart Of Gold
09:38
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 4
13 Lectures 54:28

We cover a lot of ground in this fourth series of lessons. You will learn: Major and minor scales in the first position; how to speed up your chord changes; the finger-style technique; how chords are made; major 7 and minor 7 chords; the all-important E minor pentatonic scale, hammer-ons, pull-offs and some classic songs.


In this first lesson, Bobby shows us the scales of C major and A minor in first position. Be sure to practice these scales both ascending and descending and use alternate picking throughout. This will help you to build up speed and dexterity in both hands.

1. Basic Scales. C & A Minor
10:17

In this lesson, Nick shows us a great technique that will enable us to make quicker changes from one chord to the next.

2. Chord Changing Tips
01:56

Now it’s time to learn the Fingerstyle technique. Nick breaks things down for us, showing us the right hand technique first.

3. Finger Picking
06:56

In this lesson, Nick shows us a fingerpicking version of the classic song “House Of The Rising Sun”. This song features 5 chords that we already know, so it’s a great way to practice the fingerstyle technique. It is recommended that you first take a look at the picked version Nick taught us in Level 2.

4. Finger Picking 2 – ‘Rising Sun’
03:11

Now it’s time to learn how chords are made. This will give you a far greater understanding, not only of chords, but also of scales. This lesson will help you learn the differences beween major, minor and other types of chords. First, we look at the formula for building major chords.

5. How It’s Made 1 – Major Chord
03:32

Continuing our study of how chords are made, we now look at the formula for building minor chords.

6. How It’s Made 2 – Minor Chord
01:21

Continuing our study of how chords are made, we now look at the formula for building Dominant 7 chords.

7. How It’s Made 3 – Dominant 7 Chord
03:16

In this lesson, Nick shows us some essential Major 7 chord shapes in first position. We also learn how Major 7 chords are made.

8. Major 7 Chords
05:23

Next, we’re going to look at changing between some of the Major 7 chord shapes we learned in the previous lesson.

9. Simple Changes – Major 7 Chords
01:23

In this lesson, Nick shows us some essential Minor 7 chord shapes in first position. We also learn how Minor 7 chords are made.

10. Minor 7 Chords
03:47

In this lesson, Nick introduces the holy grail of scales: The Minor Pentatonic. This is arguably the most commonly used scale among guitar players and is featured in countless classic solos and riffs alike. Here, we look at the E Minor Pentatonic scale in 1st position.

11. The E minor Pentatonic Scale
03:43

Using the minor pentatonic scale we’ve just learned, we now look at hammer-ons and pull-offs: Two essential and very expressive techniques used in all styles of guitar playing.

12. Hammer-Ons and Pull-Offs
05:20

Now it’s time to learn a classic rock n’ roll riff: The mighty “Shakin’ All Over” – a song originally performed by “Johnny Kidd and the Pirates” and made famous in the 1960s by “The Guess Who”. This riff is based around the E minor pentatonic scale in open position and serves as a fun and very musical rhythmic technique building excercise.

13. Song – Shaking All Over
04:23
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 5 - Lead Guitar
16 Lectures 01:18:39

In this next series of lessons, Nick and Bobby present a thorough introduction to playing lead guitar, providing you with a solid foundation to become a great soloist.
We cover a wide range of techniques and ideas including: the minor pentatonic scale; fast hammer-on and pull-off trills; expressive techniques such as vibrato and string bending; lots of cool blues/rock licks that you can practice over two great backing tracks; the blues scale; extending scales by breaking out of the box shape; incorporating slides and much more.

In this first lesson, we look at the movable minor pentatonic scale. In this example, we’re going to be working in the key of A minor. The minor pentatonic scale is arguably the most common scale in lead guitar. There are countless licks and riffs we can play once we’ve mastered this scale. We’re also going to practice some fast hammer-on and pull-off trills using this scale in order to build up dexterity and strength in our fingers.

Preview 08:08

Vibrato is a very expressive technique, but it can also take a while to master. That said, it’s fun to experiment with different types of vibrato, since it can also be a very personal technique. No two guitar players have exactly the same vibrato and many are distinguishable by the way they apply the technique.

2. Introducing Vibrato
09:58

In this lesson, we’re going to look at string bending. Like vibrato, string bending is a very experssive technique and can also be combined with vibrato for a vocal-like effect. Be sure to have a spare set of strings close by, since it’s not uncommon to break the odd string when you’re experimenting with string bends.

3. Introducing String Bending
06:49

Next, we’re going to learn four blues/rock licks that incorporate string bending. Try putting these licks together to come up with your own solo ideas.

4. String Bending Licks
03:55

Next, we’re going to learn five more blues/rock licks that incorporate string bending, hammer-ons, pull-offs and vibrato, all based around the A minor pentatonic scale. Try playing these licks over the backing track. You can even experiment by coming up with your own ideas.

5. Five Simple Licks
07:02

Now we’re going to put together a selection of the licks we’ve learnt so far and play them over the backing track. With just a few fairly simple licks, it really starts to sound like we’re playing lead guitar now. Try this yourself and see what else you can come up with.

6. String Bending & Simple Licks Demo
00:38

At this point, it’s a good idea if we learn the riff that’s being played on our backing track in A. If you know your power chords, this is a fairly simple rhythm part. It’s especially handy to learn this part if you want to team up with a friend and trade solos.

7. Backing Track Rhythm Part
03:11

The Blues Scale is very commonly used variation of the Minor Pentatonic Scale.

8. The Blues Scale
04:08

Now we’re going to look at another way of playing the minor pentatonic scale. This time, we’re breaking out of the box shape and incorporating slides for a very expressive feel.

9. Expanding Pentatonic Scales 1
05:00

In this lesson, we’re going to extend the range of the minor pentatonic scale even further, giving us a bigger playing area for our solos.

10. Expanding Pentatonic Scales 2
04:36

In this video, Nick shows us how to play the blues scale in the open E position.

11. Blues Scale Open E Position
01:34

Next, Nick shows us how to expand the E minor pentatonic and E blues scales, enabling us to add more range to our lead breaks.

12. Expanding Open E Pentatonic & Blues Scales
03:41

In this video, Nick shows us four more cool blues/rock licks. This time, we’re playing over a new backing track in the key of E.

13. 5 More Simple Licks
09:49

Here is the riff to our backing track in E as used in the previous lesson. It’s always handy to know what you’re soloing over and great if you’re planning to get together with a friend for a jam, taking turns to solo.

14. ‘5 More Simple Licks’ Backing Track Riff
03:00

Here’s how to play the E minor pentatonic and the E blues scales in 12th position. This is the same shape we learned in A minor, but this time, we start on the 12th fret. We also look at extending the E minor pentatonic scale in the same way we did with the A minor pentatonic. By practicing these ideas, you should eventually should be able to play minor pentatonic and blues scales in any key.

15. More Blues and Pentatonic Scales
05:23

Finally, Nick summarises what we’ve covered so far before playing us out with a solo over our backing track in E, using the various scales and ideas we’ve developed during the course of this module.

16. Beginner Lead Demo & Summary
01:47
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 6
17 Lectures 02:03:40

This essential module is all about chords. You could be the world’s best lead guitar player, but chords and rhythm guitar make up 95% of the playing of most working guitarists - so get watching!
The songwriters among you will also benefit greatly from this module as we cover: primary chords (or the i, iv, v chords); relative minors; the seven diatonic chords available in each key; the diminished chord; extending the harmony of chords using major 7, minor 7, dominant 7 and minor 7 flat 5 voicings; getting more from power chords; Add9 chord shapes; Sus (or suspended) chord shapes; 9th chord shapes; Dominant 7♯9 shapes (or the “Hendrix” chord) and lots of tips and advice on songwriting and how to incorporate these ideas and approaches into your own playing and compositions.

Preview 00:59

In this first lesson, we look at the primary chords or the i, iv, v chords. A vast amount of classic songs contain just three chords. If you’ve ever heard the term “Three chord trick”, this usually refers to a song written using the three primary chords.

2. Primary Chords
05:15

In this next lesson, we look at the relative minor, which now gives us four chords (i, iv, v & vi). Each major key has a relative minor and each minor key has a relative major. If you’re a songwriter, there are countless hit songs that feature the four primary chords we looked at in the previous video, along with and the relative minor. Here, Bobby gives you some songwriting tips and demonstrates some very popular progressions containing just 4 chords.

3. Relative Minors and Chord Progressions
08:06

Next, we look at more chords that belong to the key of C major, giving us more options when writing songs as well as providing us with a greater knowledge of music theory, which will help us figure out how to play our favourite songs.

4. Simple Chord Theory
09:45

Here we look at the diminished chord, giving us a total of seven chords in each key.

5. Simple Chord Theory 2
06:37

Now we’re going to extend the harmony or our chords. Previously, we’ve been working with three note major, minor and diminished chords (or triads). We can make these four note chords, adding more colour to our chord progressions. In other words, we’ll be working diatonically with major 7, minor 7, dominant 7 and minor 7 flat 5 chords. If the terminology baffles you at this point, don’t worry as all will be explained over the next few videos.

6. Simple Chord Theory 3
09:55

Now we’re going to extend the harmony of our chords. Previously, we’ve been working with three note major, minor and diminished chords (or triads). We can make these four note chords, adding more colour to our chord progressions. In other words, we’ll be working diatonically with major 7, minor 7, dominant 7 and minor 7 flat 5 chords.

7. Simple Chord Theory 4
09:48

Now we’re going to extend the harmony of our chords. Previously, we’ve been working with three note major, minor and diminished chords (or triads). We can make these four note chords, adding more colour to our chord progressions. In other words, we’ll be working diatonically with major 7, minor 7, dominant 7 and minor 7 flat 5 chords.

8. Simple Chord Theory 5
05:50

In this lesson, we look at getting more from power chords. You may already be familiar with power chord shapes with their roots on either the low E or the A string, but here, Bobby shows you how to stack roots and fifths to create some huge sounding power chord voicings and some fat, heavy inversions. These ideas are particularly useful when playing with a two guitar band or for thickening up rhythm guitar parts in the studio as well as providing you with extra power if you’re the only guitarist in your band.

9. Exploring Power Chords
11:36

In this lesson, Nick shows you you some very useful Add9 chord shapes that will add colour to your chord playing as well as inspire your songwriting. Movable shapes are also covered.

10. Add 9 Chords
12:59

In this next lesson, Nick shows you you some very useful Sus2 (or suspended 2nd) chord shapes that will add colour to your chord playing as well as inspire your songwriting. Movable shapes are also covered.

11. Suspended Chords – The Sus2
06:58

In this next lesson, Nick shows you you some very useful Sus4 (or suspended 4th) chord shapes that will add colour to your chord playing as well as inspire your songwriting.

12. Suspended Chords – The Sus4
03:55

In this next lesson, Nick shows you you some useful 7 Sus4 (or dominant 7th suspended 4th) chord shapes that will add colour to your chord playing as well as inspire your songwriting. Movable shapes are also covered for the 7 sus4 as well as regular sus4 chords.

13. Suspended Chords – The 7Sus4
07:22

Now Nick shows you you some more useful Add9 chord shapes that will add colour to your chord playing as well as inspire your songwriting. Most of these shapes are movable and may require more stretching than the previous shapes we looked at.

14. Add 9 Chord Variations
05:29

Here, Bobby shows you some 9th chord shapes. These are very common in all kinds of music, especially blues, funk, rock, country and jazz. 9th chords are not be confused with the Add9 chords we looked at earlier. The shapes we’re going to look at in these examples are an extension of the dominant 7 chord.

15. Introducing 9th Chords Pt1
05:03

Here, Bobby shows you some more 9th chord shapes. These are very common in all kinds of music, especially blues, funk, rock, country and jazz. 9th chords are not be confused with the Add9 chords we looked at earlier. The shapes we’re going to look at in these examples are an extension of the dominant 7 chord.

16. Introducing 9th Chords Pt2
06:24

In this video, Bobby shows you the very popular ‘Dominant 7♯9’ chord. The 7♯9 is what is known as an altered chord and is arguably one of the most commonly used altered chords in modern music. This chord has it’s roots in jazz, but was made popular in mainstream rock and blues by Jimi Hendrix, who used it to great effect.

17. Introducing 7#9 Chords
07:39
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 7
24 Lectures 03:35:56

In this comprehensive module, Nick shows you how to spice up your chord playing by creating more movement in your chord progressions. This will inspire you if you’re a singer/songwriter or if you want to make your rhythm guitar parts more interesting and musical.
We cover: Using a Capo and Harmonising using 3rds, 6ths, Octaves and 10ths. We also look at some Jimi Hendrix-esque rhythm and blues approaches to embellishing chord progressions.
A huge amount of information is provided within this set of lessons so don’t worry if your brain starts to hurt!

In this first lesson, we look at embellishing the A Minor chord. You’ll be surprised at just how much more melodic and interesting your chord progressions can become by simply adding fingers or taking them off.

Preview 09:03

Next, we look at embellishing the C major chord. As with Am i the previous lesson, you’ll be surprised at just how much more melodic and interesting your chord progressions can become by simply adding fingers or taking them off.

2. Spicing Up Your Chords 2
05:39

Next, we look at embellishing the chords of D and E.

3. Spicing Up Your Chords 3
04:50

Next, we look at embellishing the chord of G as well as other cool songwriting tips in first position. 

4. Spicing Up Your Chords 4
07:16

Yep, more chord spicing!

5. Spicing Up Your Chords 5
04:40

Next, we look at embellishing the chords of D minor and E minor.

6. Spicing Up Your Chords 6
07:41

In this lesson, Nick shows you how to use a capo. The capo is a great tool for songwriters as it allows guitarists to easily transpose songs to different keys.

7. Using A Capo
06:09

If you want to make your rhythm guitar parts more interesting and musical, we look at some Jimi Hendrix-eque, rhythm and blues approaches to embellishing chord progressions. This very tasteful approach is where lead guitar and rhythm guitar meet. You can use these ideas to spice up your chord progressions, or drop them into a lead break for a more chordal approach to soloing.

8. Playing With Inversions 1
07:40

If you want to make your rhythm guitar parts more interesting and musical, we look at some Jimi Hendrix-eque, rhythm and blues approaches to embelishing chord progressions. This very tasteful approach is where lead guitar and rhythm guitar meet. You can use these ideas to spice up your chord progressions, or drop them into a lead break for a more chordal approach to soloing.
9. Playing With Inversions 2
10:47

More versions of inversions to invert your brain with.

10. Playing With Inversions 3
11:27

In this video you will learn....more useful chord ideas!

11. More Useful Chord Ideas
09:00

Following on from the four previous lessons, we’re now going to look at some useful embelishments using movable minor chord shapes.

12. Spicing Up Minor Chords
11:59

Over the next 4 lessons, Nick presents a deep study into the technique of playing with octaves. Octaves are very common in rock, metal, jazz, funk and many other styles of music. We start by locating octaves and playing scales up the neck using octaves.

13. Playing With Octaves 1
11:53

Continuing with our study of octaves, Nick shows us some cool rock ideas that incorporate muting and open strings.

14. Playing With Octaves 2
12:55

Continuing with our study of octaves, Nick now shows us some cool funk rhythm playing ideas.

15. Playing With Octaves 3
09:32

Continuing with our study of octaves, Nick now shows us some more mellow, jazz-tinged applications of the technique incorporating the right hand thumb. This lesson also includes tips for creating our own solos, riffs and melodies using octaves.

16. Playing With Octaves 4
07:13

The next three lessons are dedicated to harmonising melodies using thirds. Nick shows us this very useful technique common in all kinds of music from rock to blues to country and many other styles.

17. Harmonising Using 3rds pt 1
11:03

We continue our study on harmonising melodies using thirds. Nick shows us this very useful technique common in all kinds of music from rock to blues to country and many other styles.

18. Harmonising Using 3rds pt 2
06:38

We continue our study on harmonising melodies using thirds. Nick shows us this very useful technique common in all kinds of music from rock to blues to country and many other styles.

19. Harmonising Using 3rds pt 3
12:13

The next four lessons are dedicated to harmonising melodies using 6ths. Nick shows us this very useful and common technique.

20. Harmonising Using 6ths pt 1
12:50

We continue our study on harmonising melodies using 6ths. Here, Nick gives us some improvising tips for soloing over a common progression.

21. Harmonising Using 6ths pt 2
13:10

We continue our study on harmonising melodies using 6ths. We take things even further now, learning the 6th shapes on different groups of strings.

22. Harmonising Using 6ths pt 3
07:23

We continue our study on harmonising melodies using 6ths. Here, we look at harmonising scales using intervals of 6ths, plus some country-tinged ideas.

23. Harmonising Using 6ths pt 4
09:09

Next, we look at harmonising the major scale using intervals of 10ths. This approach is used in all kinds of music, from subtle acoustic playing, to thickening rock lines, since its clear sound also cuts through the mix when playing using a distorted or overdriven sound.

24. Harmonising Using 10ths
05:46
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 8
13 Lectures 01:28:32

In this lead guitar orientated module, we cover a lot of ground, taking our playing to new heights as we prepare to become even better soloists.
Subjects covered include: Improvisation techniques such as question and answer phrasing, repetition and timing; fast, descending pentatonic runs; lots of cool, bluesy rock licks; the major pentatonic scale and more. There’s plenty here to have a lot of fun experimenting with.

In our first lesson, we’re going to take a look at ‘question and answer’ phrasing or ‘call and response’ phrasing. This is a very musical and conversational approach to improvisation.

1. Improvisation – Call and Response
07:29

Now it’s time to look at repetition and timing. This is another cool approach to improvisation, where we take a short phrase and either repeat it, add to it or alter the timing with some very musical results.

2. Improvisation – Repetition and Timing
08:06

In this lesson, Bobby shows us two very useful, fast descending pentatonic runs that we can get a lot of milage from when soloing. We can either play the runs all the way through or simply use fragments of them in order to get from one lick to the next.

3. Descending Pull-Off Pattern
10:38

Following on from the previous lesson on descending pentatonic runs, Nick shows us a cool variation of Bobby’s triplet run. This time, we’re starting on a different note, but there’s less picking and more hammer-ons and pull-offs for a fast, fluid legato approach.

4. Descending Pull-Offs Variation
04:35

Proving we can get a lot of milage out of just a few ideas, Nick shows us yet another very cool variation of the previous lick. This time we’re approaching it with a 16th note feel and picking more notes. Nick goes on to demonstrate both runs over the backing track in A.

5. Descending Pull-Offs 16ths
03:26

Next, Nick shows us four popular and very cool minor pentatonic licks that we can practice over the backing track.

6. Four Popular Rock Licks
07:20

Now Bobby shows us four more popular and very cool minor pentatonic/blues scale licks that we can practice over the backing track.

7. Four More Rock Licks
10:41

Not a lesson but a demo. In this clip, Nick improvises a solo over a backing track, based around the G major pentatonic scale. This is a taster for  the next 2 lessons in which we will learn the scale shapes and techniques he is using.

8. Solo Based Around G Major Pentatonic
02:02

In this lesson, Nick shows us how to play the G Major Pentatonic scale. Like its relative, the Minor Pentatonic, this is one of the most commonly used scales in improvisation and is one of the most useful shapes we can learn, since it features in all styles of lead guitar.

9. The Major Pentatonic Scale
04:28

Next, Nick shows us how to break out of the box and extend the Major Pentatonic scale.

10. Extending The Major Pentatonic Scale
01:45

Here we learn the chord progression for the backing track in G major that we used in the previous 3 clips.

11. Backing Track Chords – G Major Pentatonic
03:24

In this next lesson, Nick shows us four great licks using the G major pentatonic scale. Practice these over the backing track and create your own solos.

12. Four Licks – G Major Pentatonic
11:07

In this next lesson, Bobby shows us four more great licks using the G major pentatonic scale. Practice these over the backing track and create your own solos.

13. Four More Licks – G Major Pentatonic
13:31
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 9
16 Lectures 02:17:36

In this more advanced lead guitar module, you will learn lots of cool double stop licks; a very useful way of extending the E minor pentatonic scale; yet more useful rock licks and new techniques; how to spice up your lead playing by adding extra notes to the minor pentatonic scale; combining the major and minor pentatonic scales; the 7 note natural minor scale; the 7 note major scale; tremolo/whammy bar techniques; all about harmonics and more.

We kick things off by learning some great double-stop ideas that we can practice over the backing track. In this video, Nick shows us four very cool sounding and very useful licks.

1. Double Stops – Four Licks
10:04

Bobby shows us four more useful double stop licks that we can practice over the backing track.

2. Double Stops – Four More Licks
17:19

Nick shows us a cool way of extending the range of the E minor pentatonic scale up the neck, allowing us to play long runs from the open E String, all the way up to the 12th fret on the high E string and beyond…

3. Extended E Minor Pentatonics
06:32

Next, Bobby shows us four cool licks that we can incorporate into our own playing, including unison bends, fast, repeating pentatonic licks and wild string bending ideas. Try these ideas out for yourself by playing over the backing track.

4. Useful Soloing Techniques – 4 Licks
16:54

Here, we spice up the minor pentatonic and blues scales by adding extra notes from outside of these scales. A lot of these notes are borrowed from the major pentatonic scale. Some people refer to this new scale as the “Hybrid Blues Scale”, but don’t get too bogged down with the terminology right now. Simply practice these ideas over the backing track in E, trust your ears and decide what works for you. The results can sound very effective.

5. Spicing Up The Minor Pentatonic
15:54

Now we’re going to look at some cool ideas that combine the major pentatonic and minor pentatonic scales. Over our backing track in E, it’s possible to use both scales and many guitarists, such as Jimmy Page and Angus Young use this concept to great effect in their solos.

6. Mixing Minor and Major Pentatonics
08:06

Next, Nick shows us the 7 note natural minor (or Aeolian) scale. Previously, we learned this scale in first position, but here’s a very useful movable shape that we can use either on it’s own along with our existing minor pentatonic and blues scale ideas.

7. The Minor Scale
04:52

We change key from A minor to E minor in this next video, but we’re still using the movable minor scale we learned in the previous lesson. Over a haunting E minor backing track, Nick demonstrates how to use the 7 note minor scale along with the minor pentatonic and blues scales.

8. Mixing Blues, Pentatonic and Minor Scales
05:47

Next, Nick shows us the 7 note major (or Ionian) scale. This time, we’re in the key of G major as we look at some very useful movable shapes that we can use either on their own along with our existing major pentatonic ideas.

9. The Major Scale
05:37

Using the movable shapes we learned in the previous lesson, Nick demonstrates how to use the 7 note major scale along with the major pentatonic scale over a backing track in G major.

10. Mixing Pentatonic and Major Scales
07:46

In this fun lesson, Bobby shows us some useful whammy bar or tremolo arm applications, from subtle vibrato on single notes and chords to some wilder dive-bomb ideas.

11. Using Whammy Bar or Tremolo Arm
08:21

Next, we delve into the wonderful world of harmonics. There are 3 main types of harmonic on the guitar: Natural harmonics, tapped harmonics and pinch (or artificial) harmonics. Bobby shows us some interesting uses of these techniques from the subtle to the downright crazy. First off, we’re going to look at natural harmonics.

12. Natural Harmonics – Part 1
08:29

Continuing with our insight into harmonics, we now look at playing chords, melodies and wild dive-bomb effects using natural harmonics.

13. Natural Harmonics – Part 2
08:28

Now we’re going to look at tapped harmonics and how to play some interesting chord and riff ideas using this cool technique.

14. Tapped Harmonics
06:08

Now we’re going to look at pinch harmonics. This technique is also known as artificial harmonics. When done correctly, it enables us to really make the guitar scream…..in a good way, of course!

15. Pinched Harmonics
04:15

In this final video on harmonics, we look at a couple more applications of the technique.

16. More Harmonics Ideas
03:04
+
The Frethub Foundation Course - Level 10
14 Lectures 01:28:22

In this series of lessons, Bobby shows us some useful chord extensions. You may already be familiar with Major 7, Minor 7 and Dominant 7 chords, but here, we extend the harmony even further, creating 6th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, 13th chords and many, many more.

All the chord extensions are shown diatonically, so we will develop a strong knowledge of harmony and will leave this series of videos knowing the right chords to play in any given key. This knowledge will also aid your songwriting and compositions and add flavour to your existing chord progressions.

In this lesson, Bobby shows us some useful chord extensions.


Preview 03:11

In an earlier series of lessons, we gave each of the seven diatonic chords in each key a number from i to vii. Firstly, we learn the available chord extensions for our first chord (the i chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 1
07:04

In this lesson, we continue learning the available chord extensions for our first chord (the i chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 2
05:46

In this lesson, we continue learning the available chord extensions for our first chord (the i chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 3
07:21

In this lesson, we continue learning the available chord extensions for our first chord (the i chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 4
06:12

In this lesson, we continue learning the available chord extensions for our first chord (the i chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 5
03:56

In this lesson, we continue learning the available chord extensions for our first chord (the i chord). We then summarise what we’ve learned so far, before we move on to the ii chord.

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 6
10:05

Things start to move a lot more quickly now as we learn the available chord extensions for our second chord (the ii chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 7
08:51

Next, we learn the available chord extensions for our third chord (the iii chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 8
03:07

Next, we learn the available chord extensions for our fourth chord (the iv chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 9
09:30

Now it’s time to learn the various extensions and embellishments for our fifth chord (the v chord). There are quite a few of these, so be sure to take notes.

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 10
07:54

We continue to learn the various extensions for our fifth chord (the v chord), before summarising its many embellishments.

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 11
05:17

Next, we learn the available chord extensions for our sixth chord (the vi chord).

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 12
03:02

Finally, we learn the available chord extensions for our seventh chord (the vii chord), before summarising and learning a few tips on songwriting and adding colour to our existing chord progressions. Have fun!

Diatonic Chord Extensions - Part 13
07:06
About the Instructor
FretHub Guitar Lessons
4.5 Average rating
221 Reviews
4,612 Students
15 Courses
Learn from two highly qualified, professional guitar teachers with over 50 years of combined experience.

FretHub is a fresh and comprehensive collection of online guitar lessons, offering hundreds of hours of video tuition, from two highly qualified and respected teachers with over 50 years of combined professional experience.

As session guitarists, between us, we have played alongside artists such as Queen's Brian May, Alice Cooper, Cliff Richard, Olivia Newton-John, Tony Hadley and Gabrielle. As tutors, we have taught thousands of students worldwide.

Our guitar lessons are taught in a down-to-earth manner and presented in a logical and progressive order, providing the consistency and familiarity you get from taking guitar lessons with a private tutor.

Our aim is to give you a solid foundation and equip you with the necessary tools to learn, recognise and employ the guitar techniques and tricks that are used in the making of the music you love.

From beginners through to advanced players, FretHub has everything you need to help you become the guitarist you've always wanted to be.