Learn Avid Media Composer

Learn the critical fundamentals of Avid Media Composer. Improve your skills with these simple techniques.
  • Lectures 88
  • Video 5 Hours
  • Skill level intermediate level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
    30 day money back guarantee!
    Available on iOS and Android
    Certificate of Completion

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Course Description

This training class provides the critical fundamentals of learning Avid Media Composer from the ground-up.

It is recommended that you have a recent version of Avid Media Composer installed. Avid offers a 30 day fully functional trial if you do not own an active license.

This training represents a culmination of 20+ years experience of using Avid Media Composer. Each lesson has been methodically scripted and presents specific concepts at an easy to learn pace.

  • Practice media is provided so you can follow along.
  • Special rights to use REAL movie footage from the short-film Legacy.
  • Support is provided via 'Udemy's' Question/Answer forum.
  • Quizzes after each section to help you review critical concepts.
  • Special lecture descriptions are available for each lesson to enhance the instruction.
  • Extra bonus lessons on specific Media Composer effects are available.

* Please note: There are a few bonus lessons that require Avid FX, and Boris Continuum. Depending on the version of Avid Media Composer that you are running you may not have these third party plug-ins. This online training does not require these plug-ins, but if you have access to them, please enjoy the free bonus lessons.

What are the requirements?

  • A licensed copy of Avid Media Composer (version 7.0 is preferred)
  • Optional: A licensed copy of Photoshop CS6 or higher
  • Optional: A licensed copy of Avid FX and Boris Continuum

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Over 88 lectures and 4.5 hours of content!
  • By the end of this course, you should be able to complete an entire project from beginning to end.

What is the target audience?

  • This training focuses on editing techniques from the ground up. It is intended for those who are new to Avid Media Composer.
  • Intermediate to Advanced users may find some lessons that will enhance their current workflows and save them time.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee

Forever yours.
Lifetime access

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion

Curriculum

Section 1: Preparing for Avid Media Composer Training
Read Me First - Download the Media Files here
Text
Section 2: Avid Media Composer Interface Windows
03:17

Author Notes:

When you start a new project, you have three choices. 

  • Private: (Use this is you need to hide your projects from other users using a different PC account)
  • Shared (Use this, if you need a common place for everyone's project(s).
  • External (Use external, if you would like to manage the location of your projects manually)

The first two choices are fixed directories, and the third choice 'external' allows you to specify your own directory path.

Also, it's very important that you choose the correct project format before ingesting media.  In particular, pay special attention to the different frame rates available.  Make sure the project format matches the majority of your content to avoid lengthy render and transcode times.

01:56
Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on the three main interface windows, which are:

  • The Project window
  • The Composer Window
  • The Timeline

The project window is the heart of Avid Media Composer, and it must always remain open.  The project window contains a list of all your bins, settings, and effects.

02:49
Author Notes:

It's very important that you learn to keep things organized in Avid Media Composer.  Most importantly, I recommend that you always rename your first bin to 'sequences'. 

It is critical that you remember where 'sequences' are stored.  Therefore it makes sense to put your sequences inside a bin named that is also named sequences.

Then you may want to create additional bins for your media, graphics, titles, effects, etc.
01:33
Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses on using bin window tabs. 

Make sure you are comfortable with opening, closing, and attaching bin windows together before moving onto the next lesson.
Interface Windows
4 questions
Section 3: Working with Media
05:22
Author Notes:

This lesson is extremely important, because it explains the traditional method of importing content into Avid Media Composer. This lesson focuses on importing media, which creates new files wrapped within an .mxf file extension.

Avid Media Composer has maintained a stronghold in longer format projects, due to it's unique media management capabilities.  It's important to understand the differences between importing media and linking to media.

Avid Media Composers unique method of importing media, prevents users from having to relink media.

Each media drive will always have an Avid MediaFiles Folder, and media will be placed in the following path.

Media Drive / Avid MediaFiles / MXF / 1 / mediafilename.mxf
02:10
Author Notes:

The capture tool is only necessary if you are capturing from a tape-based format.

Please note: If you are running a software only version of Avid Media Composer, the easiest way to ingest from a tape based format is to connect your camera to your computer via a 'firewire' cable. 

If your camera and/or tape machine does not have an output for firewire, then you will need a hardware converter. I recommend a company Grass Valley  that sells high quality analog to digital convertors.  They key is too make sure your you purchase a convertor with a frame synchronizer.  This is because most consumer based VHS machines do not have a built in time based corrector, which makes it difficult to get a good quality transfer into Avid.
 
If you are trying to ingest content from a DVD disk, then you can purchase a less expensive convertor (without a frame synchronizer) n order to get your video content in Avid.

For some of you, if you have a qualified hardware option for Avid Media Composer , then you will not have to worry about purchasing an analog to firewire converter.  This is the preferred method of ingesting content from tape that is HD, or SD, but there can be considerable costs in purchasing the required hardware.
AMA - Avid Media Access
04:11
04:34
Author Notes:

The best way to manage your media within Avid Media Composer is to import it.  Here are the important concepts to remember if you choose to import media.

  • Importing Media takes up additional space, because Media Composer re-wraps the media within an .mxf extension.
  • Importing Media takes time to import.
  • Importing Media makes it easy to manage your media using the media tool.
  • Importing your media creates meta-data that provides critical information for archiving a project.

I recommend that you spend the extra time and storage requirements to import your media into Avid Media Composer for larger projects.

Also, there are two third party products that will help you archive media that has been imported into Avid. You can read about them by clicking on the link.

03:05
Author Notes:

This is a critical lesson if you are you working with Media Volumes which come from Solid State Cameras.

Examples of Popular Media Volumes include:
  • P2 Cards (Panasonic)
  • XDCAM (Sony)
  • EX Cards Media (Sony)
  • SD Cards (from a variety of manufacturers)

It is possible to edit directly from Media Volumes when using the Link to AMA function. However, it's important to note that playback performance will be reduced based on the number of edits in your project.

Therefore, it's important to understand the consolidation process, in which a volume is converted into .mxf media.  This will improve performance if you have the time and/or storage to create .mxf files.

04:10

Author Notes:

Watch this short tutorial if you are using 4K media within Avid Media Composer. Please note, you will need Media Composer version 8.3 or higher to work within a 4K project.

Working with Media
6 questions
Section 4: Bins
03:23
Author Notes:

This video contains some critical fundamentals within this video lesson that you should master before moving forward.  This includes:

Each bin window has three different views.  These are:

  • Text View
  • Frame View
  • Script View

When working in Frame View or Text View, make sure you memorize the following keyboard shortcuts.

Command L - makes clip thumbnails larger
Command K - makes clip thumbnails smaller

04:49
Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on several key concepts, which are:

  • Creating a New Sequence
  • Naming a Sequence
  • Loading a clip into the source window
  • Using the Recent Clips Menu
  • Understanding source / sequence tracks
  • Editing a Clip to the timeline
Make sure you make a habit of always creating a bin for your sequences.  This is a critical strategy for staying organizing within Avid Media Composer.

Also, it's very important that give each sequence it's own unique name.  Do not leave your sequences 'untitled', because this will create problems later.
03:10
Author Notes:

The important concept in this lesson covers Avid Media Composer's autosave feature.

Remember, the Auto-save feature is saving bins, and not projects.  That's why it is so important that you place your sequence(s) within a sequence bin so that you'll be able find your work if you encounter a problem.

The critical concepts behind the auto-save function are:

  • The saved bins are always placed in a folder called the Avid Attic
  • Bins must be moved out of the Avid Attic folder, before you can open them.
  • Make sure all your other bins are closed when opening a previous bin, you cannot have two of the same bin(s) open at the same time.
  • On a PC, you may want to add the extension .avb (avid video bin), so any bins that you have copied out of the attic will open directly into Avid Media Composer.

If you need to find the Attic, it's best to a simple search on your internal hard drive for it.  With that being said, if you are running the current version of Avid Media Composer, here are the current locations of the Avid Attic  folder.

On a PC: c: / public / public documents / Avid Media Composer / Avid Attic

On a MAC: Mac HD / Users / Shared / AvidMediaComposer / Avid Attic

The location of the Avid Attic cannot be changed.  Therefore, it may be wise to store your projects somewhere other than the internal hard drive.  This way, you will have have back up copies of all your bins if the internal hard drive were to fail.

Bins
7 questions
Section 5: Smart Tools
06:07
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the yellow Segment Mode (Extract-Splice-in) Smart Tool. 

If you are new to Avid Media Composer, I recommend that you turn off all the smart tools, and only activate one smart tool at a time as you need them.

It's important to note, that if you have ALL the smart tools turned on, the default tool is the yellow segment arrow. 

This means, if you drag a clip directly to a sequence, it will always default to a splice-in function unless a different smart tool is turned on.
05:09
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basics of using the red Segment Mode (Lift/Overwrite) smart tool function.

For most types of projects, the red segment is a very practical tool.  The red segment smart tool allows you to easily move clips around in a sequence.  It will makes it easy to replace existing content.

If you are comfortable with how the red segment smart tool functions, you may want to leave it turned on, with all the other smart tools turned off.

You can also use the keyboard shortcut Shift A to toggle the red segment mode on/off.

Please note:  In terms of a good editing workflow, I do not recommend trying to edit exclusively with the smart tools.  However, it's important to understand how each tool function.
04:24
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basics of using the ripple trim smart tool function.

The key thing to remember about the ripple trim function, is that it will change the duration of your sequence.  Therefore, be very careful when using the ripple trim, and insure you have the correct tracks indicators turned on when performing a trim. Otherwise, you risk moving clip segments out of sync from their associated audio elements.

When preforming a ripple trim, pay special attention to the 'link selection toggle' icon. By leaving this icon turned on, it less likely you will move segments out of sync when performing a ripple trim edit.


02:42
Author Notes:

The video lesson covers the basics of using the red overwrite trim tool.

The red overwrite trim tool is a very practical tool learn master.

When using the overwrite trim function, you will never have to worry about accidentally trimming something out of sync.

One important thing that the video lesson doesn't mention, is  you can use the keyboard shortcut Shift D to toggle the overwrite trim function on/off.

03:13
Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on using the smart editing tools if they are all turned on.

It's important to note that if these smart tools are all turned on, the placement of the mouse cursor plays a critical role when moving or trimming clips.  Again, I recommend that you only turn on the individual smart tools when you need them.

With the being said, pay special attention to this lesson if you choose to leave all the smart tools enabled while editing.

There is a critical setting within Avid Media Composer that allows you to configure the default smart tool when you drag and drop clips into a sequence.  I highly recommend that you change the default timeline settings so the Segment Overwrite Smart Tool becomes the default smart tool.

Editing (Smart Tools)
9 questions
Section 6: Trim Mode
03:20
Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses on the basics of using the rolling trim function.

Critical fundamentals in this lesson include:
  • Learning the difference between a rolling trim, and the smart trim tools
  • How to create a split edit

You can press the U key to enter directly into rolling trim mode.

02:47
Author Notes:

This lesson covers the fundamentals of using the slip trim function.

Slipping a clip is a very important editing technique.  It allows you to change the starting and ending point of a clip segment without affecting it's placement or duration within a sequence.

There are several ways to enter into slip mode.  These are:
  • Highlight a clip using the red segment arrow, and then press the trim button (or the U key)
  • Hold down the ALT key and draw a reverse lasso around the entire clip segment
  • Drag a reverse lasso from within the upper empty grey area above the sequence around the entire clip segment
  • Enter into trim mode, and hold down the shift key to select outgoing and incoming edges of the clip segment.
02:44
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of sliding a clip in trim mode.

Sliding a clip is similar to moving a clip with the red segment smart tool.  However, when you slide a clip using trim mode, it will not leave filler.  It will extend the media from the clip on the left to fill the gap.

In my experience sliding a clip using trim mode isn't a common editing function, but it's important to understand how it works.
Trim Modes
3 questions
Section 7: Editing
03:39
Author Notes:

This lesson covers the basic fundamentals of using the overwrite edit function within Avid Media composer.

The overwrite edit function is one of the most widely used editing tools within Avid Media Composer.  It is critical that you master the concept of performing an overwrite edit.



The keyboard shortcut for the overwrite edit is the B key. Using the overwrite edit function is one of the most efficient methods of editing within Avid Media Composer.


02:36
Author Notes:

This lesson covers the basic fundamentals of using the splice edit function.

The splice edit function is a commonly used editing tool for narrative style video editing.  Be careful when using the splice-edit function, because it will always change the duration of your sequence.

It's critical that you pay special attention to the sync relationship of video and audio segments when using the splice edit function.  Using the splice edit function can move items out of sync if you are not mindful of the tracks that are selected within the timeline window.
04:09
Author Notes:

The lesson focuses on the fundamentals of using the replace edit function. 



The Replace Edit function is one of this hidden gems within Avid Media Composer.  It's similar to the overwrite edit, but provides additional functionality that is a must-have for professionals.

The replace edit function, allow you to easily replace content within a sequence without having to mark in-out points.  It also allows you to edit your content based on a sync point, which makes it easy to pin point where specific action within a clip takes place.

I urge you to become efficient in using the replace edit tool.  The replace edit tool is hidden, and I recommend that you map it to your keyboard to use as a shortcut.

Note: If you do have in/out points with a timeline, the replace edit will obey those in/out points instead of replacing the clip segment based on the position of the playhead indicator.

01:24
 Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on adjusting user settings to configure Avid Media Composer so you can easily jump between edit points using keyboard shortcuts.

Depending on the Version of Avid Media Composer you are using, you may need to re-configure the keyboard so you can easily jump between edit points without having to use the mouse.

The default keyboard layout defines the A and S keys, as the ability to jump between edit point (forward or backward).  These keys must be configured so they do not automatically enter into trim mode.
04:01
Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on the fundamentals of using Multi-Camera Mode with Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts in this lesson include:
  • Options for creating a grouped clip
  • Switching Cameras in real-time
  • Replacing clip segments after a Multicam edit
  • Trimming Clip Segments
  • Adjusting Composer Window Settings
The maximum number of clips that can be grouped together is 9.
04:20
Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on how to export a sequence.

Key concepts in this lesson include:
  • The importance of the video output quality button
  • How to export to a tape device
  • How to add filler to the beginning of a sequence
  • Creating an export file template
  • Exporting a customized movie file
Editing
6 questions
Section 8: Title Tool
04:13
Author Notes:

This lesson focuses on the basic fundamentals of creating a lower third title using the standard title tool within Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:
  • Using the text tool to create a title
  • Adding an edge to a title
  • Adjusting the kerning between individual letters
  • Adding a drop shadow to a title
02:35
Author Notes:

The video lesson covers the fundamentals of adjusting the color of a text object.

Key concepts covered in this video lesson include:
  • Moving layered text objects forward or backward within the canvas area.
  • Creating a color blend
  • Adjusting the transparency of a text object
  • Saving a title to a bin

Note: A title object can contain a single color or a blend of colors.  However, you cannot change the color of each glyph within a title object. 

The following rules apply to title objects.

  • Each character (or glyph) within an object can be it's own font size
  • Each character can be a different font
  • Each character can not contain it's own unique color. Adjusting the color of one character will change the color of all the other characters.

The work around would be to create a separate object for each character and then group them together into a single object.


04:37
Author Notes:

The lesson focuses on editing a title to a sequence.

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:
  • Editing a title to a sequence
  • Auto Patching source tracks to edit a title to V2
  • Adding a fade in/out to a title
  • Making a change to a title that's already in a sequence
  • Adjusting the settings for the video monitor icon
03:18

Author Notes:

A new title tool is available for those who own Media Composer 7.X. It's called NewBlue Titler Pro.

It's located within the effects palette under the NewBlue Titler category within the effects palette.

02:47

Author Notes:

Avid FX is a plug-in that now ships with Avid Media Composer. If you have a current version of Avid Media Composer, you can download Avid FX from Avid's Download Center.

Avid FX is essentially the same thing as 'Boris FX' which is licensed to be used with Avid Media Composer.

Title Tool
6 questions
Section 9: Sound Mixing
04:41
Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses on configuring an audio workspace so you can easily work with audio within Avid Media Composer.

Key fundamentals in this lesson include:
  • Creating new audio tracks (Command U will add a new audio track.)
  • Configuring the audio workspace
  • Adjusting the size of Audio Tracks
  • Turning on the audio gain displays within a sequence
  • Saving a timeline view
  • Linking an audio workspace to a timeline view
05:10
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of using the audio mixer tool to adjust audio levels within Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts in this lesson include:
  • Adjusting audio levels within the Audio Mixer Tool
  • Linking audio mixer channels together
  • Copying level adjustments to other clip segments
  • Ramping up/down audio levels
  • Adding multiple audio cross fades between clip segments
02:15

Author Notes:

You must have a minimum of Media Composer Version 7 in order to adjust volume sliders directly within a clip segment.

This lesson will also demonstrate how to much a menu function to a shortcut key. So for example, you could map the Audio Waveform functional to 'Shift W'.

04:53
Author Notes:

The video lesson focuses on using audio keyframes within Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts covered in this video lesson are:
  • Adding keyframes to adjust audio levels
  • Adjusting the position of keyframes

If you don't have one of those fancy Avid Video Editing Keyboards , the keyframe button is mapped to the comma key.

Otherwise, I recommend that you map the add-keyframe button to an empty tool palette location by using the command palette.

Please note:  If you have a version of Media Composer that is earlier than 6.5, this lesson may not be relevant.

If you have a previous version of Avid Media Composer please note:

  • You cannot move multiple keyframes (left/right). You can only move one keyframe at a time.
  • When deleting a keyframe, you do not need to select it, just make sure the sequence  track indicator is turned on, and make sure the position indicator is parked over the audio keyframe.  Then press the delete key.
  • To delete multiple keyframes - mark in-out points around the keyframes you want to delete.  Make sure the sequence track indicators are turned on for those tracks.  Then press the delete key.
  • To move a section of keyframes up/down, mark in-out points around the keyframes you want to delete. Make sure the sequence track indicators are turned on for those tracks.  Then press the delete key.
04:32

Author  Notes: 

The video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of using the RTAS (Real Time Audio Suite) filters within Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Using the Solo / Mute buttons within audio tracks
  • Applying a RTAS filter to a track
  • Looping an area of the timeline while adjusting a RTAS filter
  • Inserting an additional audio track

Note: It's important to remember that when using a RTAS filter, the audio filter will affect the entire track.  If you need to apply a filter to an individual clip segment you have two options.

  1. Create a separate track for a single clip segment.
  2. Use a standard Audio Suite Filter (covered in the next video lesson)
03:27
Author Notes:

This video lesson incorporates a couple of concepts in order to demonstrate how you would use an Audio Suite filter.

Key concepts in this lesson include:

  • Using the Timewarp - Trim to Fill effect
  • Applying an Audio Suite Filter - Time Shift effect to a clip segment

It's important to note a few limitations of using audiosuiite filters:

  • You can only apply 1 audio suite filter per clip segment. 
  • You cannot preview a video clip in real-time while adjusting an audiosuite filter
  • Audio Suite Filters must always be rendered to hear the final result
Audio Editing
8 questions
Section 10: Effects
02:48
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of applying a video filter to a clip segment.

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:
  • Applying a video filter to a clip segment
  • Adjusting parameters of an effect filter
  • How to remove an effect
  • Applying a video transition
04:07
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of creating a picture-in-picture effect.

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Creating a basic Picture in Picture Effect
  • Adjusting the parameters of a picture- in-picture effect using the wireframe within the composer window.
  • Nesting an effect within a picture-in-picture

When adjusting a picture in picture within the composer window, it's important that you keep the playhead indicator parked over the pink keyframe.  Otherwise, you may accidentally create unwanted additional keyframes.

If you need slide a keyframe within the composer window, hold down the alt key and you will be able to drag the keyframe to the left or right.

03:47
Author Notes:

The video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of animating a graphic within Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts in this lesson include:
  • Importing a graphic with an Alpha Channel
  • Adding keyframes to animate a graphic
  • Adjusting effect parameters within the effect editor window
  • Sliding keyframes by holding down the alt key.


01:55

Author Notes:

Learn the basics of applying an effects filter to create a lightning bolt strike.

01:28
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to use a Boris Continuum filter on text created within Avid Media Composer.

Important Concepts in this lesson include:

  • Building a title in Media Composer
  • Using the Rays Puffy Filter from the BBC Category
  • Adjusting the parameters of the Rays Puffy Filter to 'Apply to Title-Matte"
  • Creating keyframes for the light rays

Note: The most recent version of Avid Media Composer no long ships with BCC (Boris Continuum).  However, many previous retail version of Avid Media Composer did ship with BCC.

If you own Avid Symphony, the most recent version still ships with BBC.

If you'd like to follow along, but do know have a BCC license, you can download a 15 day trial version by visiting BorisFX.com and clicking on the free trial button.


03:08
Author Notes:

This video lesson will walk you through creating a customized wind blur effect.

Key concepts in this lesson include:

  • Creating an area of filler for an effect
  • Using the paint effect to blur an image
  • Keyframing a paint effect to create a transition
02:11
Author Notes:

This video lesson will walk you through the basics of creating the 'Pleasantville Effect'

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Using a color effect to create a black/white clip segment
  • Using the Spectra Matte effect to key out a color
  • Inverting a Key
Video Effects
5 questions
Section 11: Marquee Title Tool
02:11
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to animated individual characters (glyphs) within a text object.

Important concepts in this lesson include:

  • How to select individual characters (glyphs) within a text object
  • Turning on the animation mode function
  • Adding keyframes for individual glyphs
  • Utilizing the the rotate tool
03:24
Author Notes:

This video lesson also focuses on animating individual characters (glyphs) within a text object.

Important concepts in this lesson include:

  • Animating individual glpyhs
  • Working with individual tracks for each glyph
  • Offs-setting tracks for glyphs to create a type-on effect
01:46
Author Notes:

The video lesson covers the basics of animating a light within the Avid Marquee title tool.

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Creating an edge for a text object
  • Creating an additional light source
  • Changing a light into a spot light
  • Animating a light
03:26
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basic fundamentals displaying and working with a light graph in the timeline window.

Important concepts in this lesson include:

  • Display the light graph within the timeline window
  • Adjusting keyframes for a light object
  • Adjusting light parameters within the Light Properties window

02:34
Author Notes:

The video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of creating a lower third title the blurs onto the screen.

Important concepts in this lesson include:

  • Creating a title blur using a drop shadow
  • Animating the kerning parameter

Note: Since there isn't a method within Marquee to blur characters, you can perform a trick by creating a soft drop shadow that matches the color of the title object that you want.

02:20
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the steps of using the auto-titler within Avid Marquee.

The auto titler function is a fantastic way to save time, having having Marquee automatically generate and render titles for you based on a template.  If you have a long format show that requires a lot of lower thirds, pay close attention to this video lesson.

Key concepts in this lesson include:

  • Building a title template with multiple objects
  • Renaming object layers to (text 1, text 2, ect.)
  • Importing a .txt file for auto-titler
  • Saving multiple titles to a bin

In order for the auto tilter function to work, the text file must be a plain .txt file.

03:13
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basics of creating a DVE (Digital Video Effect) within Avid Marquee

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Importing a still image into Marquee
  • Promoting a still into into a DVE object
  • Adjusting DVE parameters for an object
  • Creating an animation using DVE controls

Note:  DVE objects can only be created from still images.



01:10
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basic fundamentals of adding and animating text on a path.

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Creating a path using the shape tool
  • Converting a shape to a path object
  • Changing the motion parameters of a path from static to crawl.
01:56
Author  Notes:

This video lesson will walk you through the process of creating a giant crawling title that appears like glass.

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Creating a giant sized text object
  • Animating the text object
  • Adding a beveled edge to the text object
  • Removing the fill from a text object
03:14
Author Notes:

This video lesson is an advanced lesson that will walk you through the steps of putting moving video into each character of a giant crawling title.

Key concepts covered in this lesson are:

  • Creating a giant crawling title
  • Saving each individual letter of a crawl into Avid Media Composer
  • Replacing the fill of each letter using Avid Media Composer
03:32
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates the difference between 2D and 3D object layers in Marquee

Key concepts in this lesson include:

  • Creating an object
  • Changing an object layer from 2D to 3D
  • Animating a 3D object

Note: In Marquee, the default layer type for an object is always 2D.  This is done to enhance real-time play back within the Marquee software.  Object's may still appear that they are in 3D, but they will exist in separate planes.

If you need all your object's to exist in a single 3D plane, then you will need to convert your layers to 3D. This is done by right clicking on a layer within the layers property window, and choosing 3D for the layer type.

Marquee Title Tool
5 questions
Section 12: Advanced Editing
01:53
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to edit directly a bin window by using the Video Thumbnails.

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:
  • Using the J, K, L keys to play video thumbnails
  • Marking in and out points on the fly within a video thumbnail
  • Enabling the Edit from Bin function

Note:  This lesson was created in Media Composer version 5, but the same steps still apply to Media Composer 6.5.  The only difference being, in Media Composer 6.X, the frame view mode has been moved to the lower left corner of the bin window.
04:28
Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses on using a filler track to re-format video segment for either 4:3 or 16:9 format.

This is an important lesson, because it demonstrates how to reformat older 4:3 media into a 16:9 sequence.  Please note that this video lesson was created with Media Composer 5.0.  The same are identical when using Media Composer 6.5.

Important concepts in this lesson are:

  • Adding an empty video track (filler)
  • Assigning a specific video track number
  • Using the reformat effect
  • Using the film mask effect
  • Reposition content within a mask
01:49

Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the fundamentals of using the Pan and Zoom effect within Avid Media Composer.

This is an important lesson if you plan on incorporating hi res images into a sequence.  The Pan and Zoom filter allows the Avid to reference hi-res images externally from the standard location of the Avid MediaFiles folder.  This Pan and Zoom effect plug-in will allow the Avid to reference the hi-res content, so you will not lose quality when zooming into a hi-res image.

Note:  This video lesson was created with Media Composer version 5.0.  In this version, when you enter into effect mode, there are two fixed keyframes at the beginning and end of the clip segment.

In Media Composer 6.5, you will have to manually create your own keyframes as shown below.  If you are usnig Media Composer 6.5, I recommend that you create your first and last keyframes ahead of time by clicking on the pink Keyframe button at the bottom of the composer window before following the rest of the  video lesson.

03:01

Author Notes:

If you are running Avid Media Composer 7.X there is a new feature called Frame Flex. It allows you to pan and zoom within an image that exceeds HD resolution.

Section 13: Transition Effects
02:23
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates the simple technique of creating a graphic wipe.

Important concepts within this lesson include:

  • Importing a graphic into Avid with an Alpha Channel.
  • Creating a wipe transition
  • Keyframing a graphic to match a graphic wipe
02:20
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to create a slideshow of images that all have the same duration.  This is a critical lesson if you are working with large amounts of still images.

Key concepts in this lesson include:
  • Entering into script view
  • Adding header to all your clip segments
  • Marking in - out points for all your clip segment at the same time
  • Editing all your clip segments to a sequence at the same time
  • Adding multiple transitions to all the clip segment at the same time

Please note:  This video lesson was created using Avid Media Composer version 5.  If you are running Avid Media Composer version 6.X,  T click on the bin view menu located in the bottom left corner of the bin window to enter into Script View.

01:15

Author Notes: 

This video lesson focuses on how to create a customized quick transition that can be accessed through the quick transitions menu within Avid Media Composer.

Key concepts within this lesson include:

  • Creating a bin called Quick Transitions
  • Customizing an effect and placing that effect into the Quick Transitions Bin
  • Using the Quick Transition button to add your customized transition between two clip segments.
02:54
Author Notes:

This is an advanced video lesson that demonstrates how to create a customized plasma wipe effect.

Important concepts within this lesson include:

  • The location of the plasma wipe(s) directory on your hard drive
  • Creating a black / white wipe pattern that creates the plasma wipe transition.

The location of the plasma wipe directories are as follows:

MAC: 
Mac HD / Applications / AvidMediaComposer / SupportingFiles / PlasmaWipes / 720 x 486 / Avid
PC:
  C: / Program Files / Avid / Avid Media Composer / SupportingFiles / PlasmaWipes / 720 x 486 / Avid

To create a plasma wipe pattern, it requires five things:

  • The image must be exactly 720 x 486
  • It must be a black and white image (De-saturated)
  • It must be an RGB 8 Bit Image
  • It must be a .raw file
  • Image must reside inside a folder within the PlasmaWipes Directory

Also, you will have to re-launch the Avid software in order to see the new plasma wipe effect(s).

03:09

Author Notes:

This lesson expands on the concept of creating a customized wipe by using a combination of Photoshop and Avid Media Composer.

02:14
Author Notes:

This video lesson covers the basics of using a Fluid Morph transition to hid a jump cut.

Key concepts in this lesson include:

  • Extracting unwanted content from a clip segment (interview)
  • Adding a Fluid Morph Effect
  • Adjust the Fluid Morph Parameters

Depending on the version of Avid Media Composer you are running, you may different options available within the Fluid Morph effect.  If you are running version 6.X, you will want to make sure the pull down menu for the Fluid Morph effect is set to Stream > Stream.

In previous version(s), let it set to video stream.

Also, it's recommended that you use a direction of 3 or 4 frames when attempting to hide a jump cut as demonstrated in the video lesson.

This effect won't necessarily fix every shot that has a jump cut, but it's certainly worth a try.  The key to make this effect work, is your  talent needs to be relatively in the same position(s) before/after the cut.
Section 14: Paint Effects
01:28
Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses blurring out an unwanted area of a video frame.

Key concepts within this lesson include:

  • Applying a paint effect and changing the paint mode to blur and/or mosaic
  • Manually tracking an element in the video frame by creating keyframes

This lesson is extremely practical.  In most cases, it's much easier to manually track an image when you are trying to mask out (blur out) an area of the video frame.

As you will see in the video lesson, it's best to set your first and last keyframe positions and then go back and adjust all the 'in-between' keyframes.

01:57
Author Notes:

This video lesson will walk you the steps of creating a customized wipe using the Animatte effect.

Key concepts in this lesson include:
  • Painting a wipe pattern
  • Adjusting and keyframing a paint objects path
02:20

Author Notes:

The scratch removal tool is an incredibly easy and practical feature to repair video drop outs. The key is to create '1' frame edits for each area that needs to be repaired.

Section 15: Tracking Effects
00:33
Author Notes:

This is a short video lesson that demonstrates how to use the stabilization effect.
01:35
Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses on how to repair an image using the clone mode within the paint effect.

Key concepts within this video lesson include:

  • Using the paint effect to clone an area of the video frame
  • Tracking the motion of a clip segment
  • Applying tracking data to a cloned area
01:56
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to perform a four corner track.  This technique is useful for replacing video content within picture frames, screens, billboards, etc.

Important concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Configuring four tracking points
  • Assigning tracking data to a picture in picture
02:00
Author Notes:

The video lesson covers the fundamentals of using the magic mask function within the Paint effect.

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Applying a paint effect
  • Using paint blend modes
  • Activating the magic mask function
  • Tracking a magic mask
04:30
Author Notes:

This is an advanced video lesson covers the fundamentals of creating and tracking masks for color correction purposes.

Important concepts within this lesson include:

  • Using the Paint Effect
  • Using the Animatte Effect
  • Using a single point tracker
  • Assigning a tracking point to individual masks
  • Nesting a Color Correction effect inside an Animatte effect

Avid Media Composer is very powerful when it comes to it's ability to create and track masks.  This lesson assumes that you are already familiar with Avid Media Composer.

Section 16: Compositing Effects
01:32
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to create a 3D page curl with two different sides.

Concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Keyframing a page curl effect
  • Adjusting the radius and angle of a page curl
  • Setting the page curl priority to 'show bottom only'
01:30
Author Notes:

The video lesson will walk you through on how to create a simple light gleam through a title.

Important concepts covered in this lesson are:

  • Editing a title to a sequence
  • Opening a nest inside a title
  • Adding an edge wipe inside the nested area of a title
02:05
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to perform a chroma key effect.

Key concepts covered in this lesson includes:

  • Applying a spectra matte effect
  • Promoting a spectra matte effect to 3D parameters
  • Cropping out unwanted areas
  • Resizing a chroma keyed object
  • Adding a particle effect that contains an alpha channel
Chroma Key Soft Drop Shadow
03:43
02:59

Author Notes:

This video lesson focuses on the steps required to create a moving filmstrip effect.

Key concepts covered in this lesson are:

  • Editing a group of clips from a bin to a sequence
  • Creating a keyframed animation for a picture in picture effect
  • Cloning a picture in picture effect to other clip segments
  • Creating an off-set of clps to create a moving filmstrip

If you are running the most current version of Avid Media Composer, you can skip the step of changing the default keyframing animation to linear.

Note: This video lesson was created with Media Composer version 5.0. In this version, when you enter into effect mode, there are two fixed keyframes at the beginning and end of the clip segment.

In Media Composer 6.5 or higher, you will have to manually create your own keyframes as shown below. If this is the case, I recommend that you create your first and last keyframes ahead of time by clicking on the pink Keyframe button at the bottom of the composer window before following the rest of the video lesson.

03:05
Author Notes:

This video lesson expands on the concepts of the previous Moving Filmstrip Effect.

Key concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Building a moving filmstrip effect
  • Creating Additional Keyframes using the 3D DVE

Note:  This lesson was created using Avid Media Composer version 5, if you are running version 6.52 I recommended that you use the advanced keyframe editor to manually add keyframes instead of using the Composer window.

Press the pink keyframe button at the bottom before making adjustments in the Composer Window.

03:10
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to collapse clip segments to create a spinning 3D world effect.

Important concepts in this lesson include:

  • Creating a full size moving filmstrip effect
  • Collapsing clip segments
  • Applying a 3D ball effect to a collapsed clip segment

Note: If you are running the latest version of Avid Media Composer, you can skip the step of changing the default motion interpolation to linear.



Section 17: Third Party Effects
01:57
Author Notes:

This video lesson demonstrates how to create a 3D cube using a combination of Avid Media Composer and Avid FX.

Concepts covered in this lesson include:

  • Sending tracks from Media Composer into Avid FX
  • Changing an Avid FX track into a 3D cube
  • Assigning faces of the cube in Avid FX to Media Composer tracks
  • Sending content back from Avid FX into Media Composer

Note:  All current versions of Avid Media Composer include now include Avid FX.  If you have a previous version of Avid Media Composer,  you will have to check to see if Avid FX would included.  Most previous non-academic versions should have Avid FX at part of the retail package.

02:27
Author Notes:

This lesson demonstrates how to create a giant crawling title effect by using Avid FX.

Key concepts in this lesson are:

  • Send content from Media Composer into Avid FX
  • Mapping tracks
  • Building a large title
  • Animating the title
  • Creating a soft edge
  • Sending the content back to Avid Media Composer
04:30
Author Notes:

This is an advanced video lesson that incorporates using Avid Marquee along with Avid Media Composer.  It also uses a light rays filter from BCC.

Key concepts in this lesson include:

  • Creating a match frame freeze
  • Using Marquee to create a matte
  • Using a matte to protect an area of the video image
  • Applying a BCC ilght filter
06:02

Author Notes:

Blackmagic Design Corporation makes an amazing software product called DaVinci Resolve. This lecture will walk you through the process of round tripping your media from Avid Media Composer to/from DaVinci Resolve.

There is a Lite version of DaVinci resolve that is fully functional, so it may be worth checking it out.

Review of Lectures
6 pages
Creating 3D Extruded Logo
02:58
Section 18: Wrap Up
Wrap Up Quiz
11 questions

Instructor Biography

John Lynn , Certified Trainer - Owner GeniusDV

John has a Masters Degree from prestigious Florida State Film School that is now one of the top 5 film schools in the country. He has worked on a variety of national television shows, and has traveled the country teaching film and video editing. High profile agencies such as ESPN, NASA, Lockheed Martin, MTV, CIA, and other film/video organizations have praised his training expertise. John is one of a very select few that is an active certified Avid Media Composer and Final Cut Pro instructor.

John has taught over 1,000 individuals covering 46 states, and a large area of the Caribbean. His recent work includes a YouTube channel that contains hundreds of Avid Media Composer and Final Cut Pro Tutorials.   He is also a writer, and has published a book called 'The Portable Genius for Final Cut Pro.

John has been editing and teaching for 20 years.  He has an active Certified Media Composer and Final Cut Pro instructor. He is also available for on-site consultation and training.

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