ABLETON LIVE PRIMER - Digital Songwriting, Arranging, Mixing

This great comprehensive class will provide you with the foundations for writing, arranging and mixing in Ableton Live.
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Instructed by Jef Stott Music / Production
$50
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  • Lectures 28
  • Length 4.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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About This Course

Published 4/2015 English

Course Description

In this comprehensive 5 hour class, acclaimed producer and educator Jef Stott will go cover all of the main features of Ableton Live and focus on best practices for getting you started with digital songwriting and arranging techniques.

This will include extensive sections covering:

  • Ableton user interface overview
  • Importing and warping clips
  • Building custom drum kits
  • Working with samples
  • Building custom synth patches
  • Scene building and launching
  • MIDI recording and editing
  • Creating themes and variations
  • Musical idea generation techniques
  • Song structure
  • Arrangement workflow

Though out the entire course Jef will create musical examples in real time to keep the emphasis on creativity and flow to keep you inspired.

We will also be covering best practices for mixing and mastering your tracks to ensure that your tracks are presented in their best possible state.

This section includes extensive sections on the following;

  • Effects (insert, send return, master bus)
  • Mixing strategies
  • Automation lanes
  • Basic mastering techniques


We will also cover all of the essential nuts and bolts of Ableton including Preferences, Library navigation and Saving and Exporting sessions.

And finally, at the end of each section materials are provided to suggest further study on each topic.

This is a fun and inspired class to help jump start your creativity with Ableton Live.


What are the requirements?

  • Students should have a computer with the latest version of Ableton Live installed. A 30 day trial version of Ableton is available online from the Ableton website - https://www.ableton.com
  • It would be good to have a MIDI controller keyboard and headphones but those are not required for the class

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Create original music compositions quickly using Ableton's powerful MIDI instruments
  • Remix tracks quickly with warping, looping and adding beats on the fly in real time
  • Gain a solid understanding of best practices for mixing muli-track sessions in Ableton Live
  • Gain a solid understanding of working with MIDI in music production
  • Gain a solid understanding of creating basic arrangements in Ableton Live
  • And hopefully de-mystify the music production process

What is the target audience?

  • This is an introduction to the vast world of music production with Ableton Live software. In the class we will stay focused on Ableton but will be learning key components of music production including creating original parts, arranging and mixing

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: A brief introduction from Jef Stott and an overview of the class
00:39

A welcome and introduction from me, Jef Stott, your instructor for this class.

I have been teaching and producing with Ableton for nearly 10 years and this my first online class that I have produced independently. I have structured the course and lectures to be informative about Ableton specifically but also to show tools for creating engaging music compositions and best practices for editing and mixing in any audio software.

This class is going to be awesome!

15:04

In this short 15 minute video lecture, I will show the main features of Ableton Live including an overview of both the Session View (for improvising) and the Arrangement View (for song structure). We will also take a look at launching clips and scenes, remixing, adding beats and layers to tracks, recording our ideas into the Arrangement and some basic mixing technique.

Section 2: Session View Feature Set in Ableton Live
13:07

In this section we introduce the Session View in Ableton with the Mixing Board, Clip Slots, Scenes, and Transport Controls. We will discuss basic mixing, and how to improvise with Audio Clips in the Session View.

Notes on the Session View -

A Creative improvisation Space made for getting initial ideas down quickly

Mixing Board features -

These include volume, panning, and effects controls. Keep your output levles below 0dB to avoid clipping. -6dB is a good starting level for volume faders.

Transport controls-

These include Play, Stop Record.

Also included Metronome, Tempo and Global Quantizing for keeping your clips in sync.

Clips and Clip Slots-

Launch different clips to experiment with different combinations of sounds.

Scene Launch-

All clips in a horizontal row will launch together and in sync (if the clips are warped)

07:13

In this section we introduce the Session View in Ableton with the Mixing Board, Clip Slots, Scenes, and Transport Controls. We will discuss basic mixing, and how to improvise with Audio Clips in the Session View.


Notes on the Session View -

A Creative improvisation Space made for getting initial ideas down quickly

Mixing Board features -

These include volume, panning, and effects controls. Keep your output levles below 0dB to avoid clipping. -6dB is a good starting level for volume faders.

Transport controls-

These include Play, Stop Record.

Also included Metronome, Tempo and Global Quantizing for keeping your clips in sync.

Clips and Clip Slots-

Launch different clips to experiment with different combinations of sounds.

Scene Launch-

All clips in a horizontal row will launch together and in sync (if the clips are warped)

Section 3: Arrangement View in Ableton Live
13:13

This section introduces the Arrangement View, which is used to create song structure in the Timeline. We will discuss strategies for making dynamic and engaging song arrangements quickly in Ableton.

Notes on the Arrangement View-

Arrangement View is on a Horizontal axis following a timeline of bars and minutes.

This view is used to create song structure (Beginning/ Middle and End etc)

Utilize the Loop Brace to create a looping area with in the Arrangement.

Create Markers to mark different sections of the song

Use Duplication/ Cut and Paste to copy and move different sections of the song.

Utilize Fades to create fade in or fade outs on the clips as they play.

Work with Automation to control perimeters over time (volume, effects etc)

Section 4: Intro to Clips, Slots and the Art of Warping Tracks
10:14

In this Clips Introduction, we will go over how to import and work with various clips of audio data in the Session View of Ableton.

After completing this section you should be able to-

Import Clips from Folders in Your Library
Launch clips
Create and Launch Scenes
Rename Clips by Right Clicking and Renaming or Command/Click>Rename
Change color of Clips by right clicking and selecting a new color.

06:30

We now explore the enigmatic world of "warping" in Ableton. This is the process of pinning audio to a timeline so loops and tracks play in sync.

By the end of this section you should have a clear definition of how to warp tracks and then how to create loops of these warped tracks

Notes on Warping-

Click on Clip to open Clip Editor. This gives more editing features for the Clip.
Clips must be Warped to play in sync with Ableton song tempo.
Clips must be Warped to loop the Clip.
Add yellow warp markers to down beat of song.
Warping is difficult! Practice often….
Utilize different Loop Points and Start Points to start and loop Clips in different places in the waveform.
There are different types of Warp modes. Use Complex mode for highest resolution.
Use different loop points in different clips to use Ableton to DJ live.

07:16

We now explore the enigmatic world of "warping" in Ableton. This is the process of pinning audio to a timeline so loops and tracks play in sync.

By the end of this section you should have a clear definition of how to warp tracks and then how to create loops of these warped tracks. You should also now be able to play several "warped" tracks together in sync, mixing and matching them in the Session View.

Notes on Warping-

Click on Clip to open Clip Editor. This gives more editing features for the Clip.
Clips must be Warped to play in sync with Ableton song tempo.
Clips must be Warped to loop the Clip.
Add yellow warp markers to down beat of song.
Warping is difficult! Practice often….
Utilize different Loop Points and Start Points to start and loop Clips in different places in the waveform.
There are different types of Warp modes. Use Complex mode for highest resolution.
Use different loop points in different clips to use Ableton to DJ live.

07:15

We now explore the enigmatic world of "warping" in Ableton. This is the process of pinning audio to a timeline so loops and tracks play in sync.

By the end of this section you should have a clear definition of the following-

How to warp tracks and then how to create loops of these warped tracks.

You should also now be able to play several "warped" tracks together in sync, mixing and matching them in the Session View.

And also you should have a general idea about how to create multiple instances of the same track, warp it and add other beats to create a quick remix.

Notes on Warping-

Click on Clip to open Clip Editor. This gives more editing features for the Clip.
Clips must be Warped to play in sync with Ableton song tempo.
Clips must be Warped to loop the Clip.
Add yellow warp markers to down beat of song.
Warping is difficult! Practice often….
Utilize different Loop Points and Start Points to start and loop Clips in different places in the waveform.
There are different types of Warp modes. Use Complex mode for highest resolution.
Use different loop points in different clips to use Ableton to DJ live.

Section 5: Recording Arrangements and Automation in Ableton Live
13:59

In this Section we cover how to build an arrangement from your ideas in the Session View. We work on arranging our Scenes into solid ideas and then record them into the Arrangement View.

By the end of this section you should be able to-
Organize your clips into Scenes
Record your Scene Launches into the Arrangement View
Use Automation to create Dynamics in your new Arrangement


Notes on Scenes and Arrangements

Utilize Scenes (in the Right column of the Session View) to launch several clips together and play them in sync.

Organize different clips into horizontal rows or Scenes to build different sections of the Song

Rename Scenes to mark different sections of the song (Intro, Break, Drop etc)

To capture all Clips currently playing into a new Scene, use the Capture and Insert Scene function (Shift Command I)

Use the Session Record function to Record all Scene launches into the Arrangement View.

Record Automation in real time by selecting Session Record Enable at the top of the screen and all fader movements and control changes will be recorded in the Arrangement View.

Automated tracks have red arrows and automation lanes to indicate that Automation has been recorded on the track.

Section 6: An Introduction to MIDI in Ableton Live
04:39

Notes on MIDI

MIDI= Musical Instrument Digital Interface

Different than audio

MIDI is a command language that enables control of different devices and perimeters in hardware and software musical applications

Drag Ableton device from Library into empty MIDI track to play that instrument.

Draw MIDI notes into an empty MIDI clip with pencil tool or mouse click

Use velocity to “humanize” MIDI notes

To play MIDI notes on a controller keyboard, make sure the track is “armed”.

Once you have recorded a few MIDI clips, copy those clips onto other related instruments/ tracks to begin building an arrangement.

14:08

In this Section, we explore how to create basic beats in MIDI clips with the Impulse Drum Machine. We work on loading in sounds into the cells of the Impulse and create a few different rhythmic examples in MIDI clips. We also work with creating theme and variation and add dynamics to the beats by utilizing the velocity feature in the MIDI clips.


Notes on MIDI

MIDI= Musical Instrument Digital Interface

Different than audio

MIDI is a command language that enables control of different devices and perimeters in hardware and software musical applications

Drag Ableton device from Library into empty MIDI track to play that instrument.

Draw MIDI notes into an empty MIDI clip with pencil tool or mouse click

Use velocity to “humanize” MIDI notes

To play MIDI notes on a controller keyboard, make sure the track is “armed”.

Once you have recorded a few MIDI clips, copy those clips onto other related instruments/ tracks to begin building an arrangement.

11:08

In this Section, we will begin to start working with melodic ideas in MIDI clips using the Ableton Simpler instrument. We explore how to manually enter MIDI notes into a clip and how to add dynamics with velocity. We then move onto creating theme and variation with harmonies and changes in MIDI notes. We also begin to explore recording MIDI in real time.

Notes on MIDI

MIDI= Musical Instrument Digital Interface

Different than audio

MIDI is a command language that enables control of different devices and perimeters in hardware and software musical applications

Drag Ableton device from Library into empty MIDI track to play that instrument.

Draw MIDI notes into an empty MIDI clip with pencil tool or mouse click

Use velocity to “humanize” MIDI notes

To play MIDI notes on a controller keyboard, make sure the track is “armed”.

Once you have recorded a few MIDI clips, copy those clips onto other related instruments/ tracks to begin building an arrangement.

10:21

In this Section, we continue working with melodic ideas in MIDI clips using the Ableton Simpler instrument. We continue to explore recording MIDI performances in real time using the Record Quantization feature to help with the performance. After recording the performances, we also begin to work with synthesizers and Instrument Racks to further build our arrangements and ideas using the MIDI clips previously recorded. We also begin to work with MIDI effects to create new and interesting sections.

Notes on MIDI

MIDI= Musical Instrument Digital Interface

Different than audio

MIDI is a command language that enables control of different devices and perimeters in hardware and software musical applications

Drag Ableton device from Library into empty MIDI track to play that instrument.

Draw MIDI notes into an empty MIDI clip with pencil tool or mouse click

Use velocity to “humanize” MIDI notes

To play MIDI notes on a controller keyboard, make sure the track is “armed”.

Once you have recorded a few MIDI clips, copy those clips onto other related instruments/ tracks to begin building an arrangement.

Section 7: Ableton MIDI Devices and Instruments in Depth
14:27

In this Section, we take a deeper look at the Impulse Drum Machine Device. We will learn to load preset patches into Impulse,as well as learn how to load drum sounds into the Impulse and learn to build interesting custom kits. We then begin to explore how to write engaging new beats and rhythms.

Notes on Instruments/ Impulse Drum Machine

Use Impulse to create your own beats to get away from using other producers loops.

Load Impulse Drum machine from the Library into an empty MIDI track

Load preset kits from Library.

Use “hot swapping” to audition different kits.

Each cell in the Impulse holds a different sample or drum hit.

Load in sounds in each cell separately from the Library to create a custom kit.

All of the controls in the Impulse are used for each sound separately.

Use Transposing to change pitch

Use Filter to filter frequencies in each sound

Input MIDI notes from your computer keyboard or MIDI controller into an empty MIDI clip in the Session

Quantize MIDI notes to snap the notes to the grid (Command U)

Utilize Velocity to “humanize” the volume of the MIDI notes in the drum pattern

Copy and Paste clips onto other new drum kits to make variation in your rhythm section.

09:33

In this Section, we continue our deeper look at the Impulse Drum Machine Device. We will learn to load preset patches into Impulse,as well as learn how to load drum sounds into the Impulse and learn to build interesting custom kits. We create new empty MIDI clips and then begin to explore how to write engaging new beats and rhythms.

Notes on Instruments/ Impulse Drum Machine

Use Impulse to create your own beats to get away from using other producers loops.

Load Impulse Drum machine from the Library into an empty MIDI track

Load preset kits from Library.

Use “hot swapping” to audition different kits.

Each cell in the Impulse holds a different sample or drum hit.

Load in sounds in each cell separately from the Library to create a custom kit.

All of the controls in the Impulse are used for each sound separately.

Use Transposing to change pitch

Use Filter to filter frequencies in each sound

Input MIDI notes from your computer keyboard or MIDI controller into an empty MIDI clip in the Session

Quantize MIDI notes to snap the notes to the grid (Command U)

Utilize Velocity to “humanize” the volume of the MIDI notes in the drum pattern

Copy and Paste clips onto other new drum kits to make variation in your rhythm section.

10:14

In this Section, we will take a deeper look at the Simpler device used for playing melodic content using small samples. We explore basic tenets of sound design including filtering and ADSR functions in the Simpler device. We explore creating seamless loops within the Simpler device.

Notes on Simpler

Simpler is similar to the Impulse in that it is a sample playback device but it allows for the sample to be played across the entire range of the keyboard.

Samplers got their start in the late 70's and early 80's and created a whole new "sample based" style of music, most notably HipHop.

It is possible to make changes or contour the sound by utilizing filters and sound design tools ADSR to change the way a sample is played back.

ADSR is an acronym for Attack Sustain Decay and Release

  • Attack time is the time taken for initial run-up of level from nil to peak, beginning when the key is first pressed.
  • Decay time is the time taken for the subsequent run down from the attack level to the designated sustain level.
  • Sustain level is the level during the main sequence of the sound's duration, until the key is released.
  • Release time is the time taken for the level to decay from the sustain level to zero after the key is released.
11:36

In this Section, we will take a deeper look at the Simpler device used for playing melodic content using small samples. We then begin to record MIDI notes in real time performances into empty MIDI clips. We add dynamics with adjusting velocity perimeters. We clean up our performances by utilizing quantization. We also explore quick ways to add harmonies. And finally how to share MIDI clips with different Simpler devices playing different types of sounds (piano, synth and bass). We ultimately start building a arrangement using scenes in the Session view.

Notes on Simpler

Simpler is similar to the Impulse in that it is a sample playback device but it allows for the sample to be played across the entire range of the keyboard.

Samplers got their start in the late 70's and early 80's and created a whole new "sample based" style of music, most notably HipHop.

It is possible to make changes or contour the sound by utilizing filters and sound design tools ADSR to change the way a sample is played back.

ADSR is an acronym for Attack Sustain Decay and Release

  • Attack time is the time taken for initial run-up of level from nil to peak, beginning when the key is first pressed.
  • Decay time is the time taken for the subsequent run down from the attack level to the designated sustain level.
  • Sustain level is the level during the main sequence of the sound's duration, until the key is released.
  • Release time is the time taken for the level to decay from the sustain level to zero after the key is released.
10:19

In this Section, we introduce the Analog Synthesizer MIDI Instrument. We discuss basic synthesis and the main points therein. This includes oscillators, waveforms, filtering and amplitude. We also explore the difference between monophonic and polyphonic synth patches. Throughout the process, we create new synth patches in real time.

Different waveforms used in synthesis include sine, saw, triangle and square.

As with the Simpler, the Analog synthuses various envelopes to make changes or contour the sound by utilizing filters and sound design tools ADSR to change the way a waveform is played back.

ADSR is an acronym for Attack Sustain Decay and Release

  • Attack time is the time taken for initial run-up of level from nil to peak, beginning when the key is first pressed.
  • Decay time is the time taken for the subsequent run down from the attack level to the designated sustain level.
  • Sustain level is the level during the main sequence of the sound's duration, until the key is released.
  • Release time is the time taken for the level to decay from the sustain level to zero after the key is released.
07:26

In this Section, we continue to explore the Analog Synthesizer MIDI Instrument.

We continue to discuss basic synthesis and the main points therein. This includes oscillators, waveforms, filtering and amplitude. We also explore the difference between monophonic and polyphonic synth patches. Throughout the process, we explore different synth presets in the Ableton library.

Also the concept of Instrument Racks are introduced.

Different waveforms used in synthesis include sine, saw, triangle and square.

As with the Simpler, the Analog synthuses various envelopes to make changes or contour the sound by utilizing filters and sound design tools ADSR to change the way a waveform is played back.

ADSR is an acronym for Attack Sustain Decay and Release

  • Attack time is the time taken for initial run-up of level from nil to peak, beginning when the key is first pressed.
  • Decay time is the time taken for the subsequent run down from the attack level to the designated sustain level.
  • Sustain level is the level during the main sequence of the sound's duration, until the key is released.
  • Release time is the time taken for the level to decay from the sustain level to zero after the key is released.
Section 8: Nuts and Bolts - Library Navigation/ Preferences/ Saving and Exporting Sessions
07:41

In this Section, we go over the main features of Ableton's Library. This includes the navigation of all of the Instrument Presets and Sample Libraries. We discuss the audition function of the Library navigation and the Hot Swap feature that allows us to audition different samples and presets.

We also go over the list of instruments available in Ableton as well as a brief overview of Ableton's effects.


Notes on Library Navigation

Ableton's Library is located in the upper left of your screen

Ableton's Library is organized in two main sections

Categories – Holds all Instruments, effects and presets, categories of different sounds and all samples included in Ableton.

The sounds and presets in the Categories section can be auditioned within the Library

Places – Are locations on your computer or hard drives where you keep other sounds and presets. These include custom locations and previous Ableton Libraries

11:14

In this Section, we go over the main features of Ableton's Library. This includes the navigation of all of the Instrument Presets and Sample Libraries. We discuss the audition function of the Library navigation and the Hot Swap feature that allows us to audition different samples and presets.

We also go over the list of instruments available in Ableton as well as a brief overview of Ableton's effects and MIDI effects.


Notes on Library Navigation

Ableton's Library is located in the upper left of your screen

Ableton's Library is organized in two main sections

Categories – Holds all Instruments, effects and presets, categories of different sounds and all samples included in Ableton.

The sounds and presets in the Categories section can be auditioned within the Library

Places – Are locations on your computer or hard drives where you keep other sounds and presets. These include custom locations and previous Ableton Libraries

The main categories of Effects most often used are amps/overdriving, reverb/delay, EQ and compression

12:00

In this section, we go under the hood and look at Ableton's preferences menus. The preferences control how Ableton behaves and it is important to understand these customizable preferences.

Notes on Ableton Preferences

  • Open Preferences under Ableton menu or use Command>comma
  • Preferences will help you control the User Interface of the program to your liking. Also a good place to start exploring if you need to trouble shoot a problem.
  • Look and Feel- Change colors and viewing resolution of elements on screen with Zoom display
  • Audio- This is where you will select the audio routing In and Out of Ableton. You will use either your computers built in In/Out or the input and output of your audio interface.
  • Sample Rate can be adjusted for higher resolution audio. Most people use 44.1 as a default.
  • Adjusting your buffer size with help manage latency. Smaller buffer size will give lower latency for recording and playback but it will also compromise your computers processing power.
  • MIDI- This is where you will route your MIDI controllers input and output. Check this section if you are having trouble inputting MIDI into your session.
07:06

In this Section, we discuss the different ways to save and export your sessions. When working with any type of digital media, It is important to stay organized and Ableton helps with this quite a bit. There are several different ways to save a session and they are discussed in this session.

We also discuss how to render or "mix down" your sessions to play on other devices, in other studios or use in DJ sets.

Notes on Saving and Exporting

Save = Command S

Save Set As = Shift>Command S

Save a Copy = Creates a New Folder of Current Session

Collect All and Save = Collects all assets of current session into the root folder for that session. Very helpful if working on multiple computers or in multiple studios. There is nothing worse than getting to a new studio or on stage and not having all of your files in your session. Bad news…

Rendering files = exporting all tracks or individual tracks as audio for mixing on other programs or playing full mix of song and creating song files for releasing to the public.

Section 9: Mixing, Mastering and Effects in Ableton
14:48

In this lecture, we begin our Section on Mixing. The tactics and strategies discussed here are based on Ableton but represent best practices for mixing any type of music. This section is possibly the most important section in the course.

We waited until the mixing section to discuss effect in depth as use of effects is how a mix engineer will take control of a session and carve out a hopefully great mix. We initially discuss inserting effects (primarily EQ at this point) and how EQ is used to remove unwanted frequencies from tracks to "clean them up". This is a common practice and is recommended as opposed to adding lots of amplitude to frequencies to try to get tracks to stand out.

It is also discussed how important it is to maintain headroom in the mix. The means to continually turn tracks down instead of up in the session. This allows for more room for the effects to do their job. And of course this results in mixes with more dynamic range, which is generally more desirable.

Notes on Mixing and Effects

Building Locators help organize different sections of the song on the timeline

Solo tracks to hear one track by itself

Loop solo tracks to work on one track while it is looping.

Loop all tracks to work on one section of the song at a time.

Highlight and select tracks to make a temporary group to adjust several tracks together

Find Effects in Library and drag or “Insert” the effect onto the track directly.

Use EQ8's spectrum analyzer to see the amplitude to different frequencies in a sound.

EQ (equalization) uses filters to raise or lower the amplitude (volume) of certain frequencies.

Copy and paste effect onto different tracks

Use “hot swap” feature to audition different effects, presets and instruments

09:55

In this lecture, we continue our Section on Mixing. The tactics and strategies discussed here are based on Ableton but represent best practices for mixing any type of music in any format. This section is possibly the most important section in the course.

We discuss here the technique of creating Groups and the benefits of working with Groups of instruments. With Groups, we can Insert effects into the Groups channel to color or contour all tracks in that Group.

We discussed the function of reverb and its ability to emulate acoustic spaces.

The difference between Inserting an effect and using the Send/Return channels is also discussed here.

It is also discussed how important it is to maintain headroom in the mix. The means to continually turn tracks down instead of up in the session. This allows for more room for the effects to do their job. And of course this results in mixes with more dynamic range, which is generally more desirable.

Notes on Mixing and Effects

Highlight and select tracks to make a temporary group to adjust several tracks together

Create Groups of tracks to fold those tracks into one channel.

(Command> G)

All effects inserted into a Group will effects all tracks in that Group

Dry/ Wet perimeters control the amount of effect in the device.

Use Send and Return tracks to share one effect across many different tracks.

Use Automation to control perimeters (volume, effects etc) of tracks over time in the song.

13:13

In this lecture, we continue our Section on Mixing and begin to discuss Mastering. The tactics and strategies discussed here are based on Ableton but represent best practices for mixing any type of music in any format. This section is possibly the most important section in the course.

We discuss here the technique of creating Groups and the benefits of working with Groups of instruments. With Groups, we can Insert effects into the Groups channel to color or contour all tracks in that Group.

The difference between Inserting an effect and using the Send/Return channels is also discussed here.

The utilization of Automation and its function in making tracks more interesting is also discussed here.

We also began discussion using effects on the Master fader, particularly compression and EQ.

And a brief overview of Mastering and what type of effects and gain staging strategies one would employ in that context.

Notes on Mixing and Effects

All effects inserted into a Group will effects all tracks in that Group

Use Send and Return tracks to share one effect across many different tracks

Use Automation to control perimeters (volume, effects etc) of tracks over time in the song.

Be careful using effects on the Master Channel. It will effect everything in the entire song. Most common effects used on Master channel are EQ, compression and limiting.

The Mastering process occurs after mixing to add a final pass of compression and EQ to sweeten the mix and get sound as professional as possible.

Section 10: End of class greeting from Jef Stott
End of class greeting from Jef Stott
00:40

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Instructor Biography

Jef Stott, Music Producer and Educator

Composer, producer and performer JEF STOTT has been deftly navigating the realms of world fusion music for over a decade, where he has consistently been at the forefront of the International Global Bass movement. He released his 10th full-length studio production ARCANA in April 2012 on Six Degrees records.

As an educator, Jef has taught at several prestigious institutions including Pyramind Studios where he was lead Ableton Instructor and designed and delivered their first online class. He currently manages the Digital Lab at SFJAZZ and teaches 3 audio classes a week to teens and adults.

As a producer and composer, he has released over 10 full length albums of his own work as well as producing, performing and writing for Stellamara, Lumin, MC RAI and Qadim as well as many remixes including Azam Ali, Natasha Atlas, David Starfire, Gaudi, Adham Shaikh, Akara, Cemali, Atash, among others. His work has been released on several major labels including Universal, EMI, Six Degrees, Hearts of Space, Triloka and City of Tribes. He writes regularly for network and cable television, stage, video game and feature film.

An in demand performer, Jef Stott has embarked on several successful world tours that have taken him to festivals and club appearances in Asia, North America and Europe often sharing festival stages with the likes of contemporaries Thievery Corporation, Nickodemus, Gaudi, Makyo, Cheb I Sabbah, Beats Antique, David Starfire, Bobby Friction, FreQ Nasty, Janaka Selecta, Dub Gabriel, Kush Arora among others.

He has recently completed a Masters Degree in Interactive Media. His thesis project The Subtle Body is a multimedia interactive installation and research project that uses the electromagnetic energy from the human brain and body to control audio and visual media. Jef also teaches audio production on a regular basis from his studio and at several educational facilities throughout the Bay Area.

Jef lives and works in San Francisco, California.

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